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Delusion Health Feed

What Is Depression?

Dr. Ramakrishna Chanduri 91% (1212 ratings)
BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
What Is Depression?

What is Depression?

While we all feel sad, moody or low from time to time, some people experience these feelings intensely, for long periods of time (weeks, months or even years) and sometimes without any apparent reason. Depression is more than just a low mood – it's a serious condition that affects your physical and mental health.

Types:

-Unipolar and bipolar depression:
If the predominant feature is a depressed mood, it is called unipolar depression. However, if it is characterized by both manic and depressive episodes separated by periods of normal mood, it is referred to as bipolar disorder (previously called manic depression).

Unipolar depression can involve anxiety and other symptoms - but no manic episodes. However, research shows that for around 40 percent of the time, individuals with bipolar disorder are depressed, making the two conditions difficult to distinguish.

-Major depressive disorder with psychotic features:
This condition is characterized by depression accompanied by psychosis. Psychosis can involve delusions - false beliefs and detachment from reality, or hallucinations - sensing things that do not exist.

-Postpartum depression:
Women often experience "baby blues" with a newborn, but postpartum depression - also known as postnatal depression - is more severe.

-Major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern:
Previously called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), this condition is related to the reduced daylight of winter - the depression occurs during this season but lifts for the rest of the year and in response to light therapy.

Causes:

The causes of depression are not fully understood and may not be down to a single source. Depression is likely to be due to a complex combination of factors that include:

-depressed woman
-Depression has a wide range of causes and potential treatments.
-genetics
-biological - changes in neurotransmitter levels
-environmental
-psychological and social (psychosocial)

Some people are at higher risk of depression than others; risk factors include:

-Life events: These include bereavement, divorce, work issues, relationships with friends and family, financial problems, medical concerns, or acute stress.
-Personality: Those with less successful coping strategies or previous life trauma are more susceptible.
-Genetic factors: Having a first-degree relative with depression increases the risk.
-Childhood trauma.
-Some prescription drugs: These include corticosteroids, some beta-blockers, interferon, and other prescription drugs.
-Abuse of recreational drugs: Abuse of alcohol, amphetamines, and other drugs are strongly linked to depression.
-A past head injury.
-Having had one episode of major depression: This increases the risk of a subsequent one.
-Chronic pain syndromes: These and other chronic conditions, such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease make depression more likely.

Symptoms:

-Depressed mood
-reduced interest or pleasure in activities previously enjoyed, loss of sexual desire
-unintentional weight loss (without dieting) or low appetite
-insomnia (difficulty sleeping) or hypersomnia (excessive sleeping)
-psychomotor agitation, for example, restlessness, pacing up and down
-delayed psychomotor skills, for example, slowed movement and speech
-fatigue or loss of energy
-feelings of worthlessness or guilt
-impaired ability to think, concentrate, or make decisions
-recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, or attempt at suicide

Diagnosis:

We've become accustomed to doctors using specialized blood tests or other extensive laboratory tests to help them make a conclusive diagnosis. However, most laboratory tests are not very helpful when it comes to diagnosing depression. In fact, talking with the patient may be the most important diagnostic tool the doctor has. The recommendation is that doctors routinely screen all individuals for depression. This screening might occur during a visit for a chronic illness, at an annual wellness visit, or during pregnancy or postpartum visit.

Role of Homeopathy in Depression:

Homeopathy is a natural and non-toxic remedy for several diseases. The major advantage of homeopathy over other medication is that it does not cause any adverse side effect. It is safe and can be used at all ages without worrying about any detrimental consequence. Homeopathy is known to be very effective in treating depression. Homeopathy medicines are prescribed after a thorough study of the symptoms. Homeopathy first treats the symptoms and then provides relief; for example, the constant mental exhaustion or some unexplained physical pain. It then works on the cause of the disease. In this case, the medicines will affect and treat hormonal disorders or neurological disorders. Following this, homeopathy medicines will try to prevent the onset of depression in future. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a homeopath.

Diet and nondiet food:

1. Dark Leafy Greens: A Nutrient-Dense Inflammation Fighter
If you were to choose the healthiest food of all, the most nutrient-dense item available to us to eat, it would be dark, leafy greens, no contest. Spinach. Kale. Swiss chard. Greens are the first of the G-BOMBS (greens, beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, seeds) that Joel Fuhrman, MD, describes in his book The End of Dieting — the foods with the most powerful immune-boosting and anticancer effects.

2. Walnuts: Rich in Mood-Boosting Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Walnuts are one of the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and numerous studies have demonstrated how omega-3 fatty acids support brain function and reduce depression symptoms. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry is especially interesting. The lead authors ask the question, Why is the vast part biological research — from genetics to psychopharmacology — concentrated on neurotransmitters, when the mammalian brain is approximately 80 percent fat (lipids), and there is a growing body of research demonstrating the critical role of lipids in brain functioning? What’s more, the shift in the Western diet away from these necessary omega-3 fatty acids over the last century parallels the large rise in psychiatric disorders in that time.

3. Avocado: Its Oleic Acid Gives You Brainpower
I eat a whole one every day in my salad for lunch. Avocados are power foods because, again, they contain healthy fat that your brain needs in order to run smoothly. Three-fourths of the calories of an avocado is from fat, mostly monounsaturated fat, in the form of oleic acid. An average avocado also contains 4 grams of protein, higher than other fruits, and is filled with vitamin K, different kinds of vitamin B (B9, B6, and B5), vitamin C, and vitamin E12. Finally, they are low in sugar and high in dietary fiber, containing about 11 grams each.

4. Berries: Full of Cell-Repairing Antioxidants
Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries are some of the highest antioxidant foods available to us. I try to have a variety for breakfast in the morning. In a study published in the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, patients were treated for two years with antioxidants or placebos. After two years those who were treated with antioxidants had a significantly lower depression score. Antioxidants are like DNA repairmen. They go around fixing your cells and preventing them from getting cancer and other illnesses.

5. Mushrooms: Helpful Tools to Lower Blood Sugar
Here are two good reasons why mushrooms are good for your mental health. First, their chemical properties oppose insulin, which helps lower blood sugar levels, evening out your mood. They also are like a probiotic in that they promote healthy gut bacteria. And since the nerve cells in our gut manufacture 80 to 90 percent of our body’s serotonin — the critical neurotransmitter that keeps us sane — we can’t afford to not pay attention to our intestinal health.

6. Onions: Layered With Cancer-Fighting Allium
You won’t find this item on most lists of mood foods. However, it’s included in Dr. Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS because onions and all allium vegetables (garlic, leeks, chives, shallots, and spring onions) have been associated with a decreased risk of several cancers.

“Eating onions and garlic frequently are associated with a reduced risk of cancers of the digestive tract,” explains Fuhrman. “These vegetables also contain high concentrations of anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that contribute to their anticancer properties.” Again, if you consider the relationship between your digestive tract and your brain, it is understandable why food that can prevent cancers of the gut would also benefit your mood.

7. Tomatoes: Packed With Depression Fighters
I try to eat at least six baby tomatoes in my salad each day for lunch because tomatoes contain lots of folic acids and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are good for fighting depression. According to research published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, many studies show an elevated incidence of folate deficiency in patients with depression. In most of the studies, about one-third of depression patients were deficient in folate.

Folic acid can prevent an excess of homocysteine — which restricts the production of important neurotransmitters like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine — from forming in the body. Alpha-lipoic acid keeps coming up as I read more about nutrition and the brain, so I have begun to take it as a supplement, as well. It helps the body convert glucose into energy and therefore stabilizes mood.

8. Beans: Satisfyingly High in Mood-Stabilizing Fiber
“Beans, beans, good for the heart. The more you eat, the more you ... smile.” They make the G-BOMB list because they can act as anti-diabetes and weight-loss foods. They are good for my mood because my body (and every body) digests them slowly, which stabilizes blood sugar levels. Any food that assists me in evening out my blood sugar levels is my friend. They are the one starch that I allow myself, so on top of a salad, they help mitigate my craving for bread and other processed grains.

9. Seeds: Small but Mighty Sources of Omega-3s
When I’m close to reaching for potato chips or any kind of comfort food, I allow myself a few handfuls of sunflower seeds or any other kind of seed I can find in our kitchen. Seeds are the last food on Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS list.

Flaxseeds, hemp seeds, and chia seeds are especially good for your mood because they are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Fuhrman writes, “Not only do seeds add their own spectrum of unique disease-fighting substances to the dietary landscape, but the fat in seeds increases the absorption of protective nutrients in vegetables eaten at the same meal.”

10. Apples: Ripe With Antioxidants and Fiber
An apple a day could — if eaten with the rest of these foods — keep the psychiatrist away, at least for stretches of time. Like berries, apples are high in antioxidants, which can help to prevent and repair oxidation damage and inflammation on the cellular level. They are also full of soluble fiber, which balances blood sugar swings. A snack I have grown to love is almond butter on apple slices. I get my omega-3 fatty acid along with some fiber.

1 person found this helpful

What Is Depression?

Dr. Prashant K Vaidya 91% (15773 ratings)
Diploma In Gastroenterology, Diploma In Dermatology, BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
What Is Depression?

What is Depression?

While we all feel sad, moody or low from time to time, some people experience these feelings intensely, for long periods of time (weeks, months or even years) and sometimes without any apparent reason. Depression is more than just a low mood – it's a serious condition that affects your physical and mental health.

Types:

-Unipolar and bipolar depression:
If the predominant feature is a depressed mood, it is called unipolar depression. However, if it is characterized by both manic and depressive episodes separated by periods of normal mood, it is referred to as bipolar disorder (previously called manic depression).

Unipolar depression can involve anxiety and other symptoms - but no manic episodes. However, research shows that for around 40 percent of the time, individuals with bipolar disorder are depressed, making the two conditions difficult to distinguish.

-Major depressive disorder with psychotic features:
This condition is characterized by depression accompanied by psychosis. Psychosis can involve delusions - false beliefs and detachment from reality, or hallucinations - sensing things that do not exist.

-Postpartum depression:
Women often experience "baby blues" with a newborn, but postpartum depression - also known as postnatal depression - is more severe.

-Major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern:
Previously called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), this condition is related to the reduced daylight of winter - the depression occurs during this season but lifts for the rest of the year and in response to light therapy.

Causes:

The causes of depression are not fully understood and may not be down to a single source. Depression is likely to be due to a complex combination of factors that include:

-depressed woman
-Depression has a wide range of causes and potential treatments.
-genetics
-biological - changes in neurotransmitter levels
-environmental
-psychological and social (psychosocial)

Some people are at higher risk of depression than others; risk factors include:

-Life events: These include bereavement, divorce, work issues, relationships with friends and family, financial problems, medical concerns, or acute stress.
-Personality: Those with less successful coping strategies or previous life trauma are more susceptible.
-Genetic factors: Having a first-degree relative with depression increases the risk.
-Childhood trauma.
-Some prescription drugs: These include corticosteroids, some beta-blockers, interferon, and other prescription drugs.
-Abuse of recreational drugs: Abuse of alcohol, amphetamines, and other drugs are strongly linked to depression.
-A past head injury.
-Having had one episode of major depression: This increases the risk of a subsequent one.
-Chronic pain syndromes: These and other chronic conditions, such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease make depression more likely.

Symptoms:

-Depressed mood
-reduced interest or pleasure in activities previously enjoyed, loss of sexual desire
-unintentional weight loss (without dieting) or low appetite
-insomnia (difficulty sleeping) or hypersomnia (excessive sleeping)
-psychomotor agitation, for example, restlessness, pacing up and down
-delayed psychomotor skills, for example, slowed movement and speech
-fatigue or loss of energy
-feelings of worthlessness or guilt
-impaired ability to think, concentrate, or make decisions
-recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, or attempt at suicide

Diagnosis:

We've become accustomed to doctors using specialized blood tests or other extensive laboratory tests to help them make a conclusive diagnosis. However, most laboratory tests are not very helpful when it comes to diagnosing depression. In fact, talking with the patient may be the most important diagnostic tool the doctor has. The recommendation is that doctors routinely screen all individuals for depression. This screening might occur during a visit for a chronic illness, at an annual wellness visit, or during pregnancy or postpartum visit.

Role of Homeopathy in Depression:

Homeopathy is a natural and non-toxic remedy for several diseases. The major advantage of homeopathy over other medication is that it does not cause any adverse side effect. It is safe and can be used at all ages without worrying about any detrimental consequence. Homeopathy is known to be very effective in treating depression. Homeopathy medicines are prescribed after a thorough study of the symptoms. Homeopathy first treats the symptoms and then provides relief; for example, the constant mental exhaustion or some unexplained physical pain. It then works on the cause of the disease. In this case, the medicines will affect and treat hormonal disorders or neurological disorders. Following this, homeopathy medicines will try to prevent the onset of depression in future. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a homeopath.

Diet and nondiet food:

1. Dark Leafy Greens: A Nutrient-Dense Inflammation Fighter
If you were to choose the healthiest food of all, the most nutrient-dense item available to us to eat, it would be dark, leafy greens, no contest. Spinach. Kale. Swiss chard. Greens are the first of the G-BOMBS (greens, beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, seeds) that Joel Fuhrman, MD, describes in his book The End of Dieting — the foods with the most powerful immune-boosting and anticancer effects.

2. Walnuts: Rich in Mood-Boosting Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Walnuts are one of the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and numerous studies have demonstrated how omega-3 fatty acids support brain function and reduce depression symptoms. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry is especially interesting. The lead authors ask the question, Why is the vast part biological research — from genetics to psychopharmacology — concentrated on neurotransmitters, when the mammalian brain is approximately 80 percent fat (lipids), and there is a growing body of research demonstrating the critical role of lipids in brain functioning? What’s more, the shift in the Western diet away from these necessary omega-3 fatty acids over the last century parallels the large rise in psychiatric disorders in that time.

3. Avocado: Its Oleic Acid Gives You Brainpower
I eat a whole one every day in my salad for lunch. Avocados are power foods because, again, they contain healthy fat that your brain needs in order to run smoothly. Three-fourths of the calories of an avocado is from fat, mostly monounsaturated fat, in the form of oleic acid. An average avocado also contains 4 grams of protein, higher than other fruits, and is filled with vitamin K, different kinds of vitamin B (B9, B6, and B5), vitamin C, and vitamin E12. Finally, they are low in sugar and high in dietary fiber, containing about 11 grams each.

4. Berries: Full of Cell-Repairing Antioxidants
Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries are some of the highest antioxidant foods available to us. I try to have a variety for breakfast in the morning. In a study published in the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, patients were treated for two years with antioxidants or placebos. After two years those who were treated with antioxidants had a significantly lower depression score. Antioxidants are like DNA repairmen. They go around fixing your cells and preventing them from getting cancer and other illnesses.

5. Mushrooms: Helpful Tools to Lower Blood Sugar
Here are two good reasons why mushrooms are good for your mental health. First, their chemical properties oppose insulin, which helps lower blood sugar levels, evening out your mood. They also are like a probiotic in that they promote healthy gut bacteria. And since the nerve cells in our gut manufacture 80 to 90 percent of our body’s serotonin — the critical neurotransmitter that keeps us sane — we can’t afford to not pay attention to our intestinal health.

6. Onions: Layered With Cancer-Fighting Allium
You won’t find this item on most lists of mood foods. However, it’s included in Dr. Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS because onions and all allium vegetables (garlic, leeks, chives, shallots, and spring onions) have been associated with a decreased risk of several cancers.

“Eating onions and garlic frequently are associated with a reduced risk of cancers of the digestive tract,” explains Fuhrman. “These vegetables also contain high concentrations of anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that contribute to their anticancer properties.” Again, if you consider the relationship between your digestive tract and your brain, it is understandable why food that can prevent cancers of the gut would also benefit your mood.

7. Tomatoes: Packed With Depression Fighters
I try to eat at least six baby tomatoes in my salad each day for lunch because tomatoes contain lots of folic acids and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are good for fighting depression. According to research published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, many studies show an elevated incidence of folate deficiency in patients with depression. In most of the studies, about one-third of depression patients were deficient in folate.

Folic acid can prevent an excess of homocysteine — which restricts the production of important neurotransmitters like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine — from forming in the body. Alpha-lipoic acid keeps coming up as I read more about nutrition and the brain, so I have begun to take it as a supplement, as well. It helps the body convert glucose into energy and therefore stabilizes mood.

8. Beans: Satisfyingly High in Mood-Stabilizing Fiber
“Beans, beans, good for the heart. The more you eat, the more you ... smile.” They make the G-BOMB list because they can act as anti-diabetes and weight-loss foods. They are good for my mood because my body (and every body) digests them slowly, which stabilizes blood sugar levels. Any food that assists me in evening out my blood sugar levels is my friend. They are the one starch that I allow myself, so on top of a salad, they help mitigate my craving for bread and other processed grains.

9. Seeds: Small but Mighty Sources of Omega-3s
When I’m close to reaching for potato chips or any kind of comfort food, I allow myself a few handfuls of sunflower seeds or any other kind of seed I can find in our kitchen. Seeds are the last food on Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS list.

Flaxseeds, hemp seeds, and chia seeds are especially good for your mood because they are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Fuhrman writes, “Not only do seeds add their own spectrum of unique disease-fighting substances to the dietary landscape, but the fat in seeds increases the absorption of protective nutrients in vegetables eaten at the same meal.”

10. Apples: Ripe With Antioxidants and Fiber
An apple a day could — if eaten with the rest of these foods — keep the psychiatrist away, at least for stretches of time. Like berries, apples are high in antioxidants, which can help to prevent and repair oxidation damage and inflammation on the cellular level. They are also full of soluble fiber, which balances blood sugar swings. A snack I have grown to love is almond butter on apple slices. I get my omega-3 fatty acid along with some fiber.

1 person found this helpful

What Is Depression?

Dr. Sathish Erra 89% (15297 ratings)
BHMS, Diploma in Dermatology
Sexologist, Hyderabad
What Is Depression?

What is Depression?

While we all feel sad, moody or low from time to time, some people experience these feelings intensely, for long periods of time (weeks, months or even years) and sometimes without any apparent reason. Depression is more than just a low mood – it's a serious condition that affects your physical and mental health.

Types:

-Unipolar and bipolar depression:
If the predominant feature is a depressed mood, it is called unipolar depression. However, if it is characterized by both manic and depressive episodes separated by periods of normal mood, it is referred to as bipolar disorder (previously called manic depression).

Unipolar depression can involve anxiety and other symptoms - but no manic episodes. However, research shows that for around 40 percent of the time, individuals with bipolar disorder are depressed, making the two conditions difficult to distinguish.

-Major depressive disorder with psychotic features:
This condition is characterized by depression accompanied by psychosis. Psychosis can involve delusions - false beliefs and detachment from reality, or hallucinations - sensing things that do not exist.

-Postpartum depression:
Women often experience "baby blues" with a newborn, but postpartum depression - also known as postnatal depression - is more severe.

-Major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern:
Previously called seasonal affective disorder (SAD), this condition is related to the reduced daylight of winter - the depression occurs during this season but lifts for the rest of the year and in response to light therapy.

Causes:

The causes of depression are not fully understood and may not be down to a single source. Depression is likely to be due to a complex combination of factors that include:

-depressed woman
-Depression has a wide range of causes and potential treatments.
-genetics
-biological - changes in neurotransmitter levels
-environmental
-psychological and social (psychosocial)

Some people are at higher risk of depression than others; risk factors include:

-Life events: These include bereavement, divorce, work issues, relationships with friends and family, financial problems, medical concerns, or acute stress.
-Personality: Those with less successful coping strategies, or previous life trauma are more suceptible.
-Genetic factors: Having a first-degree relativeswith depression increases the risk.
-Childhood trauma.
-Some prescription drugs: These include corticosteroids, some beta-blockers, interferon, and other prescription drugs.
-Abuse of recreational drugs: Abuse of alcohol, amphetamines, and other drugs are strongly linked to depression.
-A past head injury.
-Having had one episode of major depression: This increases the risk of a subsequent one.
-Chronic pain syndromes: These and other chronic conditions, such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease make depression more likely.

Symptoms:

-Depressed mood
-reduced interest or pleasure in activities previously enjoyed, loss of sexual desire
-unintentional weight loss (without dieting) or low appetite
-insomnia (difficulty sleeping) or hypersomnia (excessive sleeping)
-psychomotor agitation, for example, restlessness, pacing up and down
-delayed psychomotor skills, for example, slowed movement and speech
-fatigue or loss of energy
-feelings of worthlessness or guilt
-impaired ability to think, concentrate, or make decisions
-recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, or attempt at suicide

Diagnosis:

We've become accustomed to doctors using specialized blood tests or other extensive laboratory tests to help them make a conclusive diagnosis. However, most laboratory tests are not very helpful when it comes to diagnosing depression. In fact, talking with the patient may be the most important diagnostic tool the doctor has. The recommendation is that doctors routinely screen all individuals for depression. This screening might occur during a visit for a chronic illness, at an annual wellness visit, or during a pregnancy or postpartum visit.

Role of Homeopathy in Depression:

Homeopathy is a natural and non-toxic remedy for several diseases. The major advantage of homeopathy over other medication is that it does not cause any adverse side effect. It is safe and can be used at all ages without worrying about any detrimental consequence. Homeopathy is known to be very effective in treating depression. Homeopathy medicines are prescribed after a thorough study of the symptoms. Homeopathy first treats the symptoms and then provides relief; for example, the constant mental exhaustion or some unexplained physical pain. It then works on the cause of the disease. In this case, the medicines will affect and treat the hormonal disorders or neurological disorders. Following this, homeopathy medicines will try to prevent the onset of depression in future. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a homeopath.

Diet and non diet food:

1. Dark Leafy Greens: A Nutrient-Dense Inflammation Fighter
If you were to choose the healthiest food of all, the most nutrient-dense item available to us to eat, it would be dark, leafy greens, no contest. Spinach. Kale. Swiss chard. Greens are the first of the G-BOMBS (greens, beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, seeds) that Joel Fuhrman, MD, describes in his book The End of Dieting — the foods with the most powerful immune-boosting and anticancer effects.

2. Walnuts: Rich in Mood-Boosting Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Walnuts are one of the richest plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and numerous studies have demonstrated how omega-3 fatty acids support brain function and reduce depression symptoms. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry is especially interesting. The lead authors ask the question, Why is the vast part biological research — from genetics to psychopharmacology — concentrated on neurotransmitters, when the mammalian brain is approximately 80 percent fat (lipids), and there is a growing body of research demonstrating the critical role of lipids in brain functioning? What’s more, the shift in the Western diet away from these necessary omega-3 fatty acids over the last century parallels the large rise in psychiatric disorders in that time.

3. Avocado: Its Oleic Acid Gives You Brainpower
I eat a whole one every day in my salad for lunch. Avocados are power foods because, again, they contain healthy fat that your brain needs in order to run smoothly. Three-fourths of the calories of an avocado are from fat, mostly monounsaturated fat, in the form of oleic acid. An average avocado also contains 4 grams of protein, higher than other fruits, and is filled with vitamin K, different kinds of vitamin B (B9, B6, and B5), vitamin C, and vitamin E12. Finally, they are low in sugar and high in dietary fiber, containing about 11 grams each.

4. Berries: Full of Cell-Repairing Antioxidants
Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries are some of the highest antioxidant foods available to us. I try to have a variety for breakfast in the morning. In a study published in the Journal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, patients were treated for two years with antioxidants or placebos. After two years those who were treated with antioxidants had a significantly lower depression score. Antioxidants are like DNA repairmen. They go around fixing your cells and preventing them from getting cancer and other illnesses.

5. Mushrooms: Helpful Tools to Lower Blood Sugar
Here are two good reasons why mushrooms are good for your mental health. First, their chemical properties oppose insulin, which helps lower blood sugar levels, evening out your mood. They also are like a probiotic in that they promote healthy gut bacteria. And since the nerve cells in our gut manufacture 80 to 90 percent of our body’s serotonin — the critical neurotransmitter that keeps us sane — we can’t afford to not pay attention to our intestinal health.

6. Onions: Layered With Cancer-Fighting Allium
You won’t find this item on most lists of mood foods. However, it’s included in Dr. Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS because onions and all allium vegetables (garlic, leeks, chives, shallots, and spring onions) have been associated with a decreased risk of several cancers.

“Eating onions and garlic frequently is associated with a reduced risk of cancers of the digestive tract,” explains Fuhrman. “These vegetables also contain high concentrations of anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that contribute to their anticancer properties.” Again, if you consider the relationship between your digestive tract and your brain, it is understandable why a food that can prevent cancers of the gut would also benefit your mood.

7. Tomatoes: Packed With Depression Fighters
I try to eat at least six baby tomatoes in my salad each day for lunch because tomatoes contain lots of folic acid and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are good for fighting depression. According to research published in the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, many studies show an elevated incidence of folate deficiency in patients with depression. In most of the studies, about one-third of depression patients were deficient in folate.

Folic acid can prevent an excess of homocysteine — which restricts the production of important neurotransmitters like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine — from forming in the body. Alpha-lipoic acid keeps coming up as I read more about nutrition and the brain, so I have begun to take it as a supplement, as well. It helps the body convert glucose into energy, and therefore stabilizes mood.

8. Beans: Satisfyingly High in Mood-Stabilizing Fiber
“Beans, beans, good for the heart. The more you eat, the more you ... smile.” They make the G-BOMB list because they can act as anti-diabetes and weight-loss foods. They are good for my mood because my body (and every body) digests them slowly, which stabilizes blood sugar levels. Any food that assists me in evening out my blood sugar levels is my friend. They are the one starch that I allow myself, so on top of a salad, they help mitigate my craving for bread and other processed grains.

9. Seeds: Small but Mighty Sources of Omega-3s
When I’m close to reaching for potato chips or any kind of comfort food, I allow myself a few handfuls of sunflower seeds or any other kind of seed I can find in our kitchen. Seeds are the last food on Fuhrman’s G-BOMBS list.

Flaxseeds, hemp seeds, and chia seeds are especially good for your mood because they are rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Fuhrman writes, “Not only do seeds add their own spectrum of unique disease-fighting substances to the dietary landscape, but the fat in seeds increases the absorption of protective nutrients in vegetables eaten at the same meal.”

10. Apples: Ripe With Antioxidants and Fiber
An apple a day could — if eaten with the rest of these foods — keep the psychiatrist away, at least for stretches of time. Like berries, apples are high in antioxidants, which can help to prevent and repair oxidation damage and inflammation on the cellular level. They are also full of soluble fiber, which balances blood sugar swings. A snack I have grown to love is almond butter on apple slices. I get my omega-3 fatty acid along with some fiber.

Capgras Syndrome Vs Fregoli Syndrome: Symptoms And Treatment

Dr. P.K Gupta 89% (161 ratings)
MBBS, MD, PGD-USG ,PGDS (Sexual Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Capgras Syndrome Vs Fregoli Syndrome: Symptoms And Treatment

Fregoli syndrome and Capgras syndrome are psychological disorders which cause the patients to develop delusions regarding the people around him and his social interaction. They are called delusional misidentification syndromes (DMs). Both conditions are extremely rare and are believed to develop in patients who already have other psychiatric disorders. The two conditions can be compared in the following ways:

  1. Nature of the disease: Patients with Fregoli delusion believe that the many people around him or her are actually the same person in many different disguises. Capgras syndrome, on the other hand, causes the patient to think that someone who he or she interacts with on a daily basis has been replaced by an impostor.
  2. History: Fregoli syndrome was discovered in 1927 in a woman who thought her favorite actresses were disguising themselves as her friends, her employers and even strangers. The doctors named the condition after Italian entertainer Leopoldo Fregoli who did excellent impersonations of contemporary political figures. Less than 50 cases of the disorder have been reported worldwide since then.

Capgras syndrome was discovered in 1922 by French psychiatrist Joseph Capgras. The patient claimed that identical impostors had taken the places of her husband and some of her friends. This disorder is seen more commonly in women than in men and has more reported cases than Fregoli syndrome.



What causes it?
Fregoli delusions can be caused by severe injury to the temporal and parietal areas of the brain or other neural pathways.

Capgras syndrome has more complicated neuroanatomical causes. It is often seen in patients of Alzheimer's disease and dementia and sometimes in patients of bipolar disorder and paranoia.

Symptoms behind them
The symptoms of Fregoli syndrome are delusions, visual and auditory hallucinations, cognitive defects, problems in visual memory and motor functioning.

Capgras syndrome is characterized by delusions, lack of emotional response to a familiar face, constant anxiety and depression.

Treatment
Antipsychotic medication is generally used to treat Fregoli delusions. Anti-seizure drugs and anti-depressants are prescribed to combat other symptoms of the disorder. The family members of the patient are also counselled so that they do not feel insulted by the patient's behavior.

Individualized cognitive therapy is much more beneficial in case of Capgras syndrome than medication. Habilitation therapy is a form of treatment where the patient is not repeatedly contradicted and corrected. Usually the patients' family members are made to talk to them about their mistakes gently without arguing with them.

3407 people found this helpful

Split Personality Disorder - Know Indicators Of It!

Dr. Shrikant Reddy 86% (11 ratings)
MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Indore
Split Personality Disorder - Know Indicators Of It!

Previously known as multiple personality disorder or simply, split personality disorder, dissociative identity disorder is a very serious and unpleasant form of dissociation. It is based on a lack of connection, or rather a discontinuity in thought, action, feeling, memory or even a misplaced sense of identity. It is usually considered to be a result of severe traumatic experiences in early childhood, varying from extremely physical to repeated emotional or sexual abuse. It is thought to be a self-defense mechanism where the person dissociates himself from any such experience or situation that would deem to be harmful to his or her conscious self. It is, however, not to be confused with schizophrenia

Symptoms

There are innumerable indicators that point towards dissociative identity disorder. Some of them include:

-Severe depression
-Sleeping problems such as insomnia or sleep apnea
-Alcohol or drug abuse
-Anxiety attacks and phobias
-Suicidal tendencies
-Abnormal rituals and compulsions
-Visual or auditory hallucinations
-Self-persecution and self-sabotage tendencies
- Time-loss and amnesia
-Mood swings
-Headaches and migraines
- Inability to remember important personal information
- 'Switching' of identities

Causes

The main causes of split personality disorder are unfortunately still unclear and vague although 99% of persons who suffer from this disorder have a severe traumatic history or background. The causes need not necessarily be physical or sexual abuse. It could also stem from emotional abuse like insistent neglect. Studies have also showed that children may become dissociative if their parents are either too strict or unpredictable.

3609 people found this helpful

Delusional Disorder - Tips To Identify If You're Suffering From It!

Dr. Sudhir Hebbar 87% (10 ratings)
MD - Psychiatry, MBBS, Certificate in CBT (Beck Institute, Pennsylvania, USA), ACT therapy certification UK, DBT certification course, Functional analytic psychotherapy course
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
Delusional Disorder - Tips To Identify If You're Suffering From It!

Delusional disorder refers to the condition in which an individual experiences non-bizarre delusions that are beliefs in things that aren't actually true. The delusions involve situations that take place in real life like being deceived or stalked, conspired against, etc but in actuality, these situations may be highly exaggerated or not true at all as they involve the misinterpretation of experiences or observations. This health problem tends to take place during the middle or later part of your life and is said to affect women more than men.

What are the symptoms associated with this condition?

There are certain signs that you can look out for to easily identify this condition and there are:

  1. Delusional thoughts lasting one month and above
  2. Lack of schizophrenia symptoms except delusions associated with the olfactory and tactile systems
  3. One's behavior and normal functioning doesn't witness any kind of impairment
  4. Duration of mood symptoms is short compared to the length of the delusions
  5. Disorder is not brought on by the use of substances or any medical condition
  6. Commencement of the disorder can vary from teenage years to later part of adulthood

What causes it to happen?
The root cause of the disorder is still not known, but experts are of the opinion that a variety of biological, genetic, environmental and psychological factors can cause it to occur. 

Some of these causes include: 

  • Genetics: It's said that this disorder can be passed on from parents to children. Additionally, it's more common in individuals whose family members suffer from schizophrenia or one of its types.
  • Psychological/ environmental: In addition to drug and alcohol abuse, delusional disorder can also be set off by stress.
  • Biological: Abnormalities in certain parts of the brain can lead to this problem. Areas of brain associated with thinking and perception have been found to be connected to delusional symptoms.
2349 people found this helpful

Hallucinations - 5 Common Types Of It!

Dr. Shashi Bhushan Kumar 81% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Delhi
Hallucinations - 5 Common Types Of It!

Hallucinations, in simple words, can be described as the perceptions or sensations that are experienced by a person when they are awake which seem to be real, but they are not actually real, they are created by the brain. How actually you experience hallucinations cannot be predicted that means, you may see something, you may hear something, you may taste something which isn’t real, you may smell something or feel something which does not exist.

Some common signs of hallucinations are, seeing objects which are not real, hearing voices when there is no one around or when people around do not speak, a sensation of skin crawling, etc.
Hallucination is completely different from dreams. In dreams, you are not awake, but in hallucinations you are awake. Basically, hallucinations are medical conditions or psychiatric conditions of the brain.

Signs and Symptoms of Hallucinations:

  1. Hearing voices i.e. auditory hallucinations: A person with this mental illness will feel that there is some voice coming from inside the brain or from outside and talking to them or asking them to do something specific. Sometimes, they also hear voices of people talking to each other who are not actually present.
  2. Seeing things i.e visual hallucinations: In this condition, a person starts seeing things that aren’t there for real. They could see some objects, some light patterns, some people moving around, etc.
  3. Smelling things i.e olfactory hallucinations: Sometimes, the person with this type of hallucination feels that there is some odd smell in the room and could also feel like that odd and bad smell is coming from their own body. Waking in the night smelling something strange in the room when there is nothing is another sign of olfactory hallucination.
  4. Feeling things i.e. tactile hallucinations: The person starts feeling things that are not real, such as they could feel like some insects are crawling on their body, feel someone is tickling them, or blowing hot air on their face.
  5. Tasting things i.e. gustatory hallucinations: A person with this condition could eat somethingand then feel like the food that they are eating tastes odd when the same food is fine for everyone else it.

There are many reasons for hallucinations and it varies from person to person. Mental illness is one of the main reasons for hallucinations. A recent breakup of a relationship or a loss of someone close can cause hallucinations. Substance abuse is said to be a common cause for hallucinations such as too much alcohol or drug abuse. An overdose of medicine or misuse of medicine or lack of proper sleep can also be a reason. Seek immediate medical help when you experience any of the signs in yourself or in someone close to you. Medical help can make things better.

4706 people found this helpful

Delusional Disorder - Causes And Symptoms!

Dr. Smita Srivastava 90% (23 ratings)
DNB - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Lucknow
Delusional Disorder - Causes And Symptoms!

Delusional disorder refers to the condition in which an individual experiences non-bizarre delusions that are beliefs in things that aren't actually true. The delusions involve situations that take place in real life like being deceived or stalked, conspired against, etc but in actuality, these situations may be highly exaggerated or not true at all as they involve the misinterpretation of experiences or observations. This health problem tends to take place during the middle or later part of your life and is said to affect women more than men.

What are the symptoms associated with this condition?

There are certain signs that you can look out for to easily identify this condition and there are:

  1. Delusional thoughts lasting one month and above
  2. Lack of schizophrenia symptoms except delusions associated with the olfactory and tactile systems
  3. One's behavior and normal functioning doesn't witness any kind of impairment
  4. Duration of mood symptoms is short compared to the length of the delusions
  5. Disorder is not brought on by the use of substances or any medical condition
  6. Commencement of the disorder can vary from teenage years to later part of adulthood

What causes it to happen?
The root cause of the disorder is still not known, but experts are of the opinion that a variety of biological, genetic, environmental and psychological factors can cause it to occur. 

Some of these causes include: 

  • Genetics: It's said that this disorder can be passed on from parents to children. Additionally, it's more common in individuals whose family members suffer from schizophrenia or one of its types.
  • Psychological/ environmental: In addition to drug and alcohol abuse, delusional disorder can also be set off by stress.
  • Biological: Abnormalities in certain parts of the brain can lead to this problem. Areas of brain associated with thinking and perception have been found to be connected to delusional symptoms.

6 Symptoms Of Delusional Disorder!

Dr. Sarthak Dave 89% (503 ratings)
MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Ahmedabad
6 Symptoms Of Delusional Disorder!

Delusional disorder refers to the condition in which an individual experiences non-bizarre delusions that are beliefs in things that aren't actually true. The delusions involve situations that take place in real life like being deceived or stalked, conspired against, etc but in actuality, these situations may be highly exaggerated or not true at all as they involve the misinterpretation of experiences or observations. This health problem tends to take place during the middle or later part of your life and is said to affect women more than men.

What are the symptoms associated with this condition?

There are certain signs that you can look out for to easily identify this condition and there are:
- Delusional thoughts lasting one month and above
- Lack of schizophrenia symptoms except delusions associated with the olfactory and tactile systems
- One's behavior and normal functioning doesn't witness any kind of impairment
- Duration of mood symptoms is short compared to the length of the delusions
- Disorder is not brought on by the use of substances or any medical condition

- Commencement of the disorder can vary from teenage years to later part of adulthood

 

What causes it to happen?
The root cause of the disorder is still not known, but experts are of the opinion that a variety of biological, genetic, environmental and psychological factors can cause it to occur. 

Some of these causes include:

  • Genetics - It's said that this disorder can be passed on from parents to children. Additionally, it's more common in individuals whose family members suffer from schizophrenia or one of its types.
  • Psychological/ environmental - In addition to drug and alcohol abuse, delusional disorder can also be set off by stress.
  • Biological - Abnormalities in certain parts of the brain can lead to this problem. Areas of brain associated with thinking and perception have been found to be connected to delusional symptoms.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2490 people found this helpful

Hallucinations - Signs You Are Suffering From Them!

Dr. Sumit Singh 86% (37 ratings)
DM - Neurology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Gurgaon
Hallucinations - Signs You Are Suffering From Them!

Getting hallucinations is a mental condition where a person sees, feels, hears, and tastes things that actually don't exist beyond one's heightened imagination or delusion. It involves the experience of perceiving something not present.  Hallucinations can be pleasing or frightening. However, there is almost always an identifiable cause behind it. 

They can be triggered by:

  1. Taking hallucinogenic or psychotropic substances
  2. Mental conditions like dementia and schizophrenia
  3. Neurological conditions like Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease
  4. Macular degeneration, leading to loss of vision
  5. Migraines and brain tumor can also lead to such delusions

Some of the signs of hallucinations:

  1. Hearing voices: The medical term for hearing voices is called an 'auditory hallucination'. A person may sense sounds or noises coming from inside or outside of their mind. The noise might be random or disrupting. One might also feel the voices talking to each other or trying to tell them something. Most of the times, these voices come from inside the person's mind; or in some cases, one's heightened perception may make a normal noise delusional.
  2. Seeing things: This is also called visual hallucinations. For instance, one may see unnatural things like a floating chair in thin air. It all depends on a person's perception. Sometimes these hallucinations appear as bright flashy spots or rays of light.
  3. False sense of taste and smell: Technically, these are known as gustatory and olfactory hallucinations respectively. One may feel a kind of odor coming from one's body or surrounding; or a person might feel that something he/she is drinking or eating has an odd taste. This is again too much thinking, causing delusional sensory activities. 
  4. Tactile hallucinations: This is when a person feels things that don't exist. One may feel that he/she is being touched or tickled even when no one else is around or that insects are crawling beneath the skin. One may experience strange sensations, which are not a part of a reality.
2966 people found this helpful
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