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Chronic Pancreatitis Tips

Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts - Diagnosis And Management You Must Know!

Dr. Sachin Wani 89% (36 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB - Gastroenterology
Gastroenterologist, Thane
Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts - Diagnosis And Management You Must Know!

The diagnosis as well as management of pancreatic cystic lesions is a general problem. Nearly 1% of the patients in the chief medical centers have been observed to have pancreatic cystic lesions on cross sectional imaging. It has also been observed that a quarter of all pancreas scanned in an autopsy series contain pancreatic cysts. Earlier, these cystic lesions were regarded benign but with increasing evidence made available from the cystic lesions, they are regarded as origin of pancreatic malignancies.

Information on Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts
The most vital medical tools that are used in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cystic lesions include the endoscopic ultrasound and cross sectional imaging. These are used to distinguish non-mucinous cysts from mucinous cysts. The identification of pancreatic cysts creates a lot of anxiety for the clinicians as well as the patients related to the probable presence of a fatal tumor. The findings of a macro cystic lesion that enclose viscous fluid loaded in CEA are helpful in the analysis of a mucinous lesion. 

The most common pancreatic cysts are the non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudo cysts, and they can be detected easily by imaging. The identification of pancreatic irregularity with probable association with malignant cells is a vital source of referral for the specialist. The set of guidelines that have been proposed for the management and diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts are based specifically on the analysis of the quality of the data. It is also designed to address the most important and frequent clinical scenarios. The diagnostic suggestions are provided based on the clinical problem as well as the risk of malignancy.

Imperative Guidelines to Follow
To achieve accurate diagnosis of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts is indeed a great challenge. It is all the more important to find the reproducible methods that can be used to stratify threat of cancer for the patients. The main guidelines include a two year screening interval of cysts that can be of any size as well as stopping observation after 5 years, in case there is no change.  The new guidelines, for the most part, recommend surgery if more than one concerning feature is confirmed on the MRI by use of endoscopic ultrasound. The new guidelines even suggest discontinuation of inspection after the surgery if no dysplasia or invasive cancer is identified. The guidelines have mainly been developed by use of Grading of Recomendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation.

1 person found this helpful

5 Symptoms Of Pancreatitis!

Dr. C.S. Ramachandran 86% (587 ratings)
FICS, FCCP (USA), DNB (General Surgery), MS - General Surgery, MBBS
General Surgeon, Delhi
5 Symptoms Of Pancreatitis!

An inflammation of the pancreas is known as pancreatitis. The pancreas is an organ that produces digestive enzymes. Pancreatitis might start any day and continue for long period and it requires immediate medical attention. It is of two types- acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Although the treatment usually requires hospitalization, pancreatitis can be easily stabilized and the underlying cause can be treated thereafter.

Causes:
Pancreatitis may be caused due to various reasons:

  1. Gall bladder stone: The pancreatic duct lies next to the bile duct. The gallstones enter the small intestine after passing through the common bile duct. Often the stones that remain in the common bile duct have a negative effect on the pancreas, which causes a hindrance to the normal flow of the pancreatic fluids, causing pancreatitis. Also a back flow of the bile into the pancreas can cause pancreatitis. 
  2. Alcohol: Long time alcohol use also causes pancreatitis. Alcohol can damage the pancreas tremendously causing it to get inflamed.
  3. Other causes: Hereditary disorders in the pancreas, cystic fibrosis, high level of triglycerides, and a few medicines may also cause pancreatitis.

Symptoms: 

  1. The first symptom of pancreatitis is abdominal pain: The pain may be sudden or gradually increasing, but is usually aggravated after eating. It is severe and constant, and may continue for a few days. If you are suffering from pancreatitis, you will feel very sick after a sudden attack and you might require medical assistance immediately.
  2. Swollen abdomen: Pancreatitis may cause your abdominal area to swell up and become tender.
  3. Nausea: If your abdomen suddenly starts paining due to the onset of pancreatitis, you tend to feel extremely nauseous. You might end up vomiting and may also have violent heaves.
  4. Fever: The inflammation will cause you to run a temperature, along with a searing pain in your stomach, which will make you feel extremely uncomfortable.
  5. Rapid pulse: Pancreatitis affects the rate, at which the heart beats, causing a rapid increase in the pulse rate.
3 people found this helpful

Pancreatitis - Signs You Need To Be Aware Of!

Dr. Purnendu Bhowmik 86% (18 ratings)
MS - General Surgery, FACS, Fellowship in Minimal Access Surgery(FMAS), FIAGES-Advanced Laparoscopy, FALS(Fellow Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery), FAIS
General Surgeon, Kolkata
Pancreatitis - Signs You Need To Be Aware Of!

An inflammation of the pancreas is known as pancreatitis. The pancreas is an organ that produces digestive enzymes. Pancreatitis might start any day and continue for long period and it requires immediate medical attention. It is of two types- acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Although the treatment usually requires hospitalization, pancreatitis can be easily stabilized and the underlying cause can be treated thereafter.

Pain in pancreatitis typically radiates towards back as well apart from producing pain in abdomen. Acute pancreatitis may be of two types-

  1. Mild acute pancreatitis- It usually resolves with conservative management after hospitalisation. 
  2. Severe acute pancreatitis- This type of pancreatitis is associated with organ failure. This type is life threatening and needs treatment at critical care unit.

Pancreatitis may be caused due to various reasons:

  1. Gall bladder stone: The pancreatic duct lies next to the bile duct. The gallstones enter the small intestine after passing through the common bile duct. Often the stones that remain in the common bile duct have a negative effect on the pancreas, which causes a hindrance to the normal flow of the pancreatic fluids, causing pancreatitis. Also a back flow of the bile into the pancreas can cause pancreatitis. 
  2. Alcohol: Long time alcohol use also causes pancreatitis. Alcohol can damage the pancreas tremendously causing it to get inflamed.
  3. Other causes: Hereditary disorders in the pancreas, cystic fibrosis, high level of triglycerides, and a few medicines may also cause pancreatitis.

Symptoms: 

  1. The first symptom of pancreatitis is abdominal pain: The pain may be sudden or gradually increasing, but is usually aggravated after eating. It is severe and constant, and may continue for a few days. If you are suffering from pancreatitis, you will feel very sick after a sudden attack and you might require medical assistance immediately.
  2. Swollen abdomen: Pancreatitis my cause your abdominal area to swell up and become tender.
  3. Nausea: If your abdomen suddenly starts paining due to the onset of pancreatitis, you tend to feel extremely nauseous. You might end up vomiting and may also have violent heaves.
  4. Fever: The inflammation will cause you to run a temperature, along with a searing pain in your stomach, which will make you feel extremely uncomfortable.
  5. Rapid pulse: Pancreatitis affects the rate at which the heart beats, causing a rapid increase in the pulse rate.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1905 people found this helpful

Pancreatitis - Know The Possible Signs!

Dr. Yogendra Kumar 88% (56 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery
General Surgeon, Ghaziabad
Pancreatitis - Know The Possible Signs!

An inflammation of the pancreas is known as pancreatitis. The pancreas is an organ that produces digestive enzymes. Pancreatitis might start any day and continue for long period and it requires immediate medical attention. It is of two types- acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Although the treatment usually requires hospitalization, pancreatitis can be easily stabilized and the underlying cause can be treated thereafter.

Causes:
Pancreatitis may be caused due to various reasons:

  1. Gall bladder stone: The pancreatic duct lies next to the bile duct. The gallstones enter the small intestine after passing through the common bile duct. Often the stones that remain in the common bile duct have a negative effect on the pancreas, which causes a hindrance to the normal flow of the pancreatic fluids, causing pancreatitis. Also a back flow of the bile into the pancreas can cause pancreatitis. 
  2. Alcohol: Long time alcohol use also causes pancreatitis. Alcohol can damage the pancreas tremendously causing it to get inflamed.
  3. Other causes: Hereditary disorders in the pancreas, cystic fibrosis, high level of triglycerides, and a few medicines may also cause pancreatitis.

Symptoms: 

  1. The first symptom of pancreatitis is abdominal pain: The pain may be sudden or gradually increasing, but is usually aggravated after eating. It is severe and constant, and may continue for a few days. If you are suffering from pancreatitis, you will feel very sick after a sudden attack and you might require medical assistance immediately.
  2. Swollen abdomen: Pancreatitis may cause your abdominal area to swell up and become tender.
  3. Nausea: If your abdomen suddenly starts paining due to the onset of pancreatitis, you tend to feel extremely nauseous. You might end up vomiting and may also have violent heaves.
  4. Fever: The inflammation will cause you to run a temperature, along with a searing pain in your stomach, which will make you feel extremely uncomfortable.
  5. Rapid pulse: Pancreatitis affects the rate, at which the heart beats, causing a rapid increase in the pulse rate

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1918 people found this helpful

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency: What You Need To Know

Dr. Manish Joshi 92% (13 ratings)
Fellowship In Colorectal Surgery, DNB - Surgical Gastroenterology, Fellowship In Minimal Access Surgery, Fellowship In HPB Surgery, Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS), MS - General Surgery, MBBS
Gastroenterologist, Bangalore
Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency: What You Need To Know

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI), also called pancreatic deficiency, is a disorder where the pancreas is unable to produce the sufficient amount of enzymes that are required to digest food. The pancreatic enzymes help to break down and absorb nutrients from the food in the small intestine. So, this disease causes nutritional deficiencies.

Causes of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
This condition is generally caused as a complication of other diseases because EPI develops only as a result of severe damage to the pancreas. The following reasons can cause EPI:

  1. Inflammation of the pancreas: After surgery in the pancreas, stomach or the intestines, there may be inflammation in the pancreas as a post-surgical complication. A high content of triglyceride fat in the blood can also cause pancreatic inflammation and hinder the secretion of the enzymes.
  2. Chronic Pancreatitis: In this disease, the pancreatic ducts are swollen and blocked and so the digestive enzymes cannot be passed into the small intestine. This condition is often caused by a heavy consumption of alcohol.
  3. Cystic FibrosisThe digestive fluids and enzymes become thick and sticky and block the passageways of the pancreas and other organs like the lungs and the kidneys. This can obstruct secretion and passage of enzymes afterwards.
  4. Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome: This is an autosomal recessive genetic condition where enzyme-producing pancreatic cells are not formed properly. This rare disorder causes a number of associated disorders like bone marrow diseases, skeletal defects and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

Symptoms of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
The symptoms appear in the middle stages of the disease when the process of absorption of nutrients has already been affected. The common warning signs are:

  1. Digestive problems like gas, diarrhea and indigestion because the food remains mostly undigested.
  2. Severe and frequent stomach pain in the lower abdominal region
  3. Greasy stools due to the excretion of undigested fat
  4. Rapid loss of weight and body mass due to mal-absorption of nutrients
  5. Constantly feeling bloated and full even if you have not eaten anything
  6. A general sense of fatigue and exhaustion
  7. Excessive bleeding from small wounds because protein deficiencies hamper blood clotting
  8. Pain in the muscles and bones
  9. Increased susceptibility to infections of the body systems
  10. Anemia
  11. Joint pains
  12. Abnormal swelling of the limbs or edema

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

 

3367 people found this helpful

Causes and Symptoms of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI)

Dr. Vijay Rai 88% (53 ratings)
MBBS,MD, DM
Gastroenterologist, Kolkata
Causes and Symptoms of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI)

Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency or EPI is also known as pancreatic deficiency, a disorder where the pancreas is unable to produce sufficient amount of enzymes that are required to digest food. The pancreatic enzymes help to break down and absorb nutrients from the food in the small intestine. So, this disease causes nutritional deficiencies.

Causes of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency : 

This condition is generally caused as a complication of other diseases because EPI develops only as a result of severe damage to the pancreas. The following reasons can cause EPI:

  1. Inflammation of the pancreas: After surgery in the pancreas, stomach or the intestines, there may be inflammation in the pancreas as a post-surgical complication. A high content of triglyceride fat in the blood can also cause pancreatic inflammation and hinder the secretion of the enzymes.
  2. Chronic Pancreatitis: In this disease, the pancreatic ducts are swollen and blocked and so the digestive enzymes cannot be passed into the small intestine. This condition is often caused by a heavy consumption of alcohol.
  3. Cystic Fibrosis: The digestive fluids and enzymes become thick and sticky and block the passageways of the pancreas and other organs like the lungs and the kidneys. This can obstruct secretion and passage of enzymes afterwards.
  4. Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome or SBDS: SBDS is an autosomal recessive genetic condition where enzyme producing pancreatic cells is not formed properly. This rare disorder causes a number of associated disorders like bone marrow diseases, skeletal defects and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

Symptoms of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency:

Symptoms of EPI often appear in the middle stages of the disease when the process of absorption of nutrients has already been affected. The common warning signs are:

  1. Digestive problems like gas, diarrhea and indigestion because the food remains mostly undigested.
  2. Severe and frequent stomach pain in the lower abdominal region
  3. Greasy stools due to the excretion of undigested fat
  4. Rapid loss of weight and body mass due to malabsorption of nutrients
  5. Constantly feeling bloated and full even if you have not eaten anything
  6. A general sense of fatigue and exhaustion
  7. Excessive bleeding from small wounds because protein deficiencies hamper blood clotting
  8. Pain in the muscles and bones
  9. Increased susceptibility to infections of the body system
  10. Anemia
  11. Joint pains
  12. Abnormal swelling of the limbs or edema

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3684 people found this helpful

Management and Diagnosis of Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts

Dr. Himanshu Yadav 86% (37 ratings)
MBBS, M.S. (Gold Medalist), MCh - Surgical Gastroenterology/G.I. Surgery
Gastroenterologist, Agra
Management and Diagnosis of Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts

The diagnosis as well as management of pancreatic cystic lesions is a general problem. Nearly 1% of the patients in the chief medical centers have been observed to have pancreatic cystic lesions on cross sectional imaging. It has also been observed that a quarter of all pancreas scanned in an autopsy series contain pancreatic cysts. Earlier, these cystic lesions were regarded benign but with increasing evidence made available from the cystic lesions, they are regarded as origin of pancreatic malignancies.

Information on Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts: The most vital medical tools that are used in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cystic lesions include the endoscopic ultrasound and cross sectional imaging. These are used to distinguish non-mucinous cysts from mucinous cysts. The identification of pancreatic cysts creates a lot of anxiety for the clinicians as well as the patients related to the probable presence of a fatal tumor. The findings of a macro cystic lesion that enclose viscous fluid loaded in CEA are helpful in the analysis of a mucinous lesion. 

The most common pancreatic cysts are the non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudo cysts, and they can be detected easily by imaging. The identification of pancreatic irregularity with probable association with malignant cells is a vital source of referral for the specialist. The set of guidelines that have been proposed for the management and diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts are based specifically on the analysis of the quality of the data. It is also designed to address the most important and frequent clinical scenarios. The diagnostic suggestions are provided based on the clinical problem as well as the risk of malignancy.

Imperative Guidelines to Follow: To achieve accurate diagnosis of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts is indeed a great challenge. It is all the more important to find the reproducible methods that can be used to stratify threat of cancer for the patients. The main guidelines include a two year screening interval of cysts that can be of any size as well as stopping observation after 5 years, in case there is no change.  The new guidelines, for the most part, recommend surgery if more than one concerning feature is confirmed on the MRI by use of endoscopic ultrasound. The new guidelines even suggest discontinuation of inspection after the surgery if no dysplasia or invasive cancer is identified. The guidelines have mainly been developed by use of Grading of Recomendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gastroenterologist.

3018 people found this helpful

Pancreatic Cysts: Diagnosis and Management

Dr. Parthasarathy G 91% (30 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery, M.Ch - Surgical Gastroenterology/G.I. Surgery, Fellowship in Hepatobiliary Surgery & Liver Transplantation, International Visiting Scholar
Surgical Gastroenterologist, Hyderabad
Pancreatic Cysts: Diagnosis and Management

The diagnosis as well as management of pancreatic cystic lesions is a general problem. Nearly 1% of the patients in the chief medical centers have been observed to have pancreatic cystic lesions on cross sectional imaging. It has also been observed that a quarter of all pancreas scanned in an autopsy series contain pancreatic cysts. Earlier, these cystic lesions were regarded benign but with increasing evidence made available from the cystic lesions, they are regarded as origin of pancreatic malignancies.

Information on Asymptomatic Neoplastic Pancreatic Cysts: The most vital medical tools that are used in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cystic lesions include the endoscopic ultrasound and cross sectional imaging. These are used to distinguish non-mucinous cysts from mucinous cysts. The identification of pancreatic cysts creates a lot of anxiety for the clinicians as well as the patients related to the probable presence of a fatal tumor. The findings of a macro cystic lesion that enclose viscous fluid loaded in CEA are helpful in the analysis of a mucinous lesion. 

The most common pancreatic cysts are the non-neoplastic inflammatory pseudo cysts, and they can be detected easily by imaging. The identification of pancreatic irregularity with probable association with malignant cells is a vital source of referral for the specialist. The set of guidelines that have been proposed for the management and diagnosis of patients with asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts are based specifically on the analysis of the quality of the data. It is also designed to address the most important and frequent clinical scenarios. The diagnostic suggestions are provided based on the clinical problem as well as the risk of malignancy.

Imperative Guidelines to Follow: To achieve accurate diagnosis of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts is indeed a great challenge. It is all the more important to find the reproducible methods that can be used to stratify threat of cancer for the patients. The main guidelines include a two year screening interval of cysts that can be of any size as well as stopping observation after 5 years, in case there is no change.  The new guidelines, for the most part, recommend surgery if more than one concerning feature is confirmed on the MRI by use of endoscopic ultrasound. The new guidelines even suggest discontinuation of inspection after the surgery if no dysplasia or invasive cancer is identified. The guidelines have mainly been developed by use of Grading of Recomendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a gastroenterologist.

3103 people found this helpful

Know Everything About Pancreatitis!!

Dr. Vishal Khurana 91% (20 ratings)
MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Gastroenterology, MNAMS
Gastroenterologist, Faridabad
Know Everything About Pancreatitis!!

What is Pancreas? 

The pancreas is an organ placed behind the stomach in abdomen. It produces: digestive juices (produce by exocrine pancreas, it help in digestion of food) as well as digestive hormones i.e. insulin and glucagon (produce by endocrine pancreas) which help in regulation of the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. 

What is pancreatitis? 

Pancreatitis is abnormal swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. Once the gland becomes inflamed, the condition can progress to swelling of the gland and surrounding blood vessels, bleeding, infection, and damage to the gland. Normally, digestive enzymes secreted by the pancreas do not become active until they reach the small intestine. But when the pancreas is inflamed, digestive juices become trapped and start "digesting" the pancreas itself. If this damage persists, the gland may not be able to carry out normal functions. 

What Are the Types of Pancreatitis? 

Pancreatitis may be acute (new, short-term) or chronic (ongoing, long-term). Either type can be very severe, even life-threatening. Either type can have serious complications. 

  1. Acute pancreatitis usually begins soon after the damage to the pancreas begins. Attacks are mostly very mild, but about 20% of them are very severe. The onset of acute pancreatitis is often very sudden. The inflammation usually clears up within several days after treatment begins. An attack lasts for a short time and usually resolves completely as the pancreas returns to its normal state. Some people have only one attack, whereas other people have more than one attack, but the pancreas always returns to its normal state unless necrotizing pancreatitis develops and becomes life-threatening. 
  2. Chronic pancreatitis begins as acute pancreatitis. If the pancreas becomes scarred during the attack of acute pancreatitis, it cannot return to its normal state. The damage to the gland continues, worsening over time. Pancreatitis can come and go quickly, or it can be a chronic problem. Treatment will depend on whether your pancreatitis is acute or chronic. 

What are the causes of pancreatitis? 
Alcohol abuse and gallstones are the two main causes of pancreatitis, accounting for 80% to 90% of all individuals diagnosed with pancreatitis. 

  1. Gallstones form from a buildup of material within the gallbladder, another organ in the abdomen (please see previous illustration). A gallstone can block the pancreatic duct, trapping digestive juices inside the pancreas. Pancreatitis due to gallstones tends to occur most often in women older than 50 years of age. 
  2. Pancreatitis from alcohol use usually occurs in individuals who have been long-term alcohol drinkers for at least five to seven years. Most cases of chronic pancreatitis are due to alcohol abuse. Pancreatitis is often already chronic by the first time the person seeks medical attention (usually for severe pain).
  3. The remaining 10% to 20% of cases of pancreatitis have various causes, including the following:
    1. medications, 
    2. exposure to certain chemicals, 
    3. injury (trauma), as might happen in a car accident or bad fall leading to abdominal trauma, 
    4. hereditary disease, 
    5. surgery and certain medical procedures, 
    6. infections such as mumps (not common), 
    7. abnormalities of the pancreas or intestine, or 
    8. high fat levels in the blood. 
  4. In about 15% of cases of acute pancreatitis and 40% of cases of chronic pancreatitis, the cause is never known. 

What are the risk factors for pancreatitis? 

The major risk factors for pancreatitis are excessive alcohol intake and gallstones. Although the definition for excessive alcohol intake can vary from person-to-person, most health-care professionals suggest that moderate consumption is no more than two alcoholic drinks a day for men and one a day for women and the elderly. However, people with pancreatitis secondary to alcohol intake are usually advised to avoid all alcohol intake. Other risk factors include: 

  • a family history of pancreatitis, 
  • high levels of fat (triglycerides) in the blood, 
  • cigarette smoking
  • certain inherited disorders such as cystic fibrosis, and 
  • taking certain medicines (for example estrogen therapy, diuretics, and tetracycline). 

What Are the Symptoms of Pancreatitis? 

Most people who have acute or chronic pancreatitis experience upper abdominal pain as their primary symptom. Some of those who have chronic pancreatitis may show inflammation on imaging scans, but otherwise may show no symptoms. Symptoms of pancreatitis may include: 

  • upper abdominal pain: pain that wraps around the upper body and involves the back in a band-like pattern 
    • Pain associated with pancreatitis may last from a few minutes to several hours at a time. 

In severe cases, discomfort from chronic pancreatitis could become constant. Your pain is likely to increase after you eat or when you’re lying down. Try sitting up or leaning forward to make yourself more comfortable. 

Severe acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Severe acute pancreatitis may cause dehydration and low blood pressure. The heart, lungs, or kidneys can fail. If bleeding occurs in the pancreas, shock and even death may follow. People who have chronic pancreatitis may also experience steatorrhea, or fatty stools that give off a foul odor. Steatorrhea can be a sign of malabsorption. This means you’re not getting all of your essential nutrients because your pancreas doesn’t secrete enough digestive enzymes to break down your food. 

How pancreatitis is diagnosed? 

Your doctor will likely use a combination of blood tests and imaging scans to make a diagnosis. If you have acute pancreatitis, blood tests may show a rise in your level of pancreatic enzymes. During acute pancreatitis, the blood contains at least three times the normal amount of amylase and lipase, digestive enzymes formed in the pancreas. Changes may also occur in other body chemicals such as glucose, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate. After the person's condition improves, the levels usually return to normal. Ultrasound, MRI/MRCP, and CT scans can reveal the size of your pancreas and whether you have a blockage of the bile ducts. 

How to treat pancreatitis? 

Treatment for acute or chronic pancreatitis often involves hospitalization. In acute pancreatitis, the choice of treatment is based on the severity of the attack. If no complications are present, care usually focuses on relieving symptoms and supporting body functions so that the pancreas can recover. Treatment for acute pancreatitis includes intravenous (IV) fluids, and medications for pain, nausea and vomiting.

  • The pancreas is key to your digestive process and needs to rest to heal. No food or liquid should be taken by mouth for a few days. This is called bowel rest. By refraining from food or liquid intake, the intestinal tract and pancreas are given a chance to start healing.
  • For this reason, you may receive fluids and nutrition intravenously or through a tube that goes from your nose directly into your jejunum (part of small intestine), which is called a nasojejunal feeding tube. Restarting an oral diet depends on your condition. Some people feel better after a couple of days. Others need a week or two to heal sufficiently. 
  • If needed, medications for pain and nausea are prescribed. 
  • Those people who are having trouble breathing are given oxygen. 
  • Antibiotics are given if the health-care professional suspects an infection may be present. 
  • Some people may need a nasogastric (NG) tube. The thin, flexible plastic tube is inserted through the nose and down into the stomach to suck out the stomach juices. This suction of the stomach juices rests the intestine further, helping the pancreas recover. 
  • If the attack lasts longer than a few days, nutritional supplements are administered through an IV line. 
  • Surgery is sometimes needed to treat complications 
    • If your doctor diagnoses gallstones or other blockages of the bile ducts, you may need surgery to correct these problems later on. 

What are the complications of pancreatitis? 

Some patients may develop complications. These complications are rare, but they’re more common in people with chronic pancreatitis: 

Can pancreatitis be prevented? 

The following recommendations may help to prevent further attacks or to keep them mild: 

  • Completely eliminate alcohol because it is the only way to reduce the chance of further attacks in cases of pancreatitis caused by alcohol use, to prevent the pancreatitis from worsening, and to prevent the development of complications that can be very serious or even fatal. 
  • Eat small frequent meals. If in the process of having an attack, avoid solid foods for several days to give the pancreas a chance to recover. 
  • Eat a balanced diet high in carbohydrates and low in fats because may help individuals decrease the risk for pancreatitis since it is likely these actions will decrease the risk of gallstones, a major risk factor for pancreatitis. 
  • If pancreatitis is due to chemical exposure or medications, the source of the exposure will need to be found and stopped, and the medication will need to be discontinued. 
  • Don't smoke 
  • Maintain a healthy weight 
  • Exercise regularly. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gastroenterologist.
2963 people found this helpful

Diabetes and Your Pancreas: What You Should Know?

Dr. Shradha Doshi 90% (176 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma in Diabetology, DDM, CCACCD
Diabetologist, Mumbai
Diabetes and Your Pancreas: What You Should Know?

You pass by that cake shop and happen to glance at a sumptuous chocolate cake, and then realization dawns on you that you are not allowed to eat simple sugar. Why? The answer to it is diabetes, for which you only have your pancreas to blame. Situated behind the stomach in your body, the pancreas is an organ whose role is to produce hormones and enzymes that aid in the digestive process. One of the hormones that the pancreas produces is insulin which is required by the body to metabolize sugar that is present in various foods.

So, if your pancreas does not produce the required amount of insulin or fails to utilize insulin effectively, it leads to accumulation of glucose in your blood. The improper functioning of the pancreas leads to diabetes. There are four types of diabetes and they are classified with respect to the manner in which the pancreas mal-functions:

  1. Type 1 Diabetes In this type, the immune system of the body wrongly attacks the insulin producing beta cells of the pancreas. This impairs the ability of the pancreas to secrete insulin, thus leading to Type 1 diabetes. However, even after extensive research in this field, the exact triggers haven’t been found yet.
  2. Type 2 Diabetes: Type 2 Diabetes develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can either mean that the pancreas is producing less than normal insulin or the body is not being able to utilize the produced insulin effectively. Factors such as a poor diet and lack of exercise increase the risks of Type 2 Diabetes.
  3. Pre-diabetes: Pre-diabetes is a condition wherein the blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered as ‘diabetes’. It can again occur due to a reduced secretion of insulin or the inability of the body to utilize the insulin effectively.
  4. Gestational Diabetes This type of diabetes can develop only during pregnancy. This occurs primarily as the placenta, that connects the fetus with the body’s blood supply, produces hormones that impair the functioning of insulin. This type of diabetes can affect both the mother and the child.

Another common link
Pancreatitis is a condition that is marked by an inflammation of the pancreatic cells. This inflammation can damage the beta cells that produce insulin, thus resulting in diabetes. Factors that contribute to it are a poor diet, lack of exercise, presence of excessive calcium in the blood or excessive alcohol consumption.

How can you avoid the same?
It is best that you incorporate lifestyle changes if you have any of these disorders, and talk to your doctor about a treatment plan. Making a few simple lifestyle changes such as eating healthy, avoiding smoking and exercising on a regular basis can reduce the chances of you suffering from both diabetes and any other pancreatic problems. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor.

4988 people found this helpful
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