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Bleeding Gums Tips

When A Tooth Brush Can Be Changed?

Dr. A. K. Verma 90% (97 ratings)
Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Allahabad
When A Tooth Brush Can Be Changed?
  • A tooth brush can be safely used until it's fibers become hard and brush fibers spreading. When brush fibers becomes hard and start spreading we should change our tooth brush. Continuous use of a harden and spreading tooth brush cause more abrasion of tooth and puncture of gums and bleeding of gums. At long time use of this can cause gingival recision and thermal sensation of teeth.
  •  A brush can be safely used approx 20 to 30 days.
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How do I know if I have gum disease?

BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
How do I know if I have gum disease?

How do I know if I have gum disease?
Gum disease is generally painless, even though it damages the bone supporting the teeth. Gum disease (gingivitis) will usually show itself as red, swollen gums that bleed when you brush or clean between your teeth. Many people are worried when they notice their gums are bleeding and then brush more gently, or stop altogether. In fact, it is important that you continue to clean regularly and thoroughly if you are to fight the gum disease. If the bleeding does not go away within a few days see your dental team to ask for their advice.

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Bleeding Gums - 7 Ways They Can be Managed!

BDS
Dentist, Delhi
Bleeding Gums - 7 Ways They Can be Managed!

If you see blood while brushing your teeth, do not ignore it; it could be a sign of gum disease. A build-up of plaque along the gum line is the main trigger for bleeding gums. If left untreated, it could lead to gingivitis or periodontitis which could further lead to the loss of teeth. Bleeding gums are also caused by:

  1. Vigorous brushing
  2. Bleeding disorders or use of blood thinners
  3. Hormonal changes during pregnancy
  4. Improper flossing
  5. Deficiency of vitamin K
  6. Tooth or gum related infection
  7. Ill-fitting dentures and braces
  8. Leukemia
  9. Scurvy

In most cases, bleeding gums can be treated at home. Here are a few tips.

  1. Use a soft bristle toothbrush. Ideally, you should brush your teeth gently after every meal, but if that is not possible, begin and end each day by brushing your teeth.
  2. Avoid mouthwashes that contain alcohol as this can worsen the condition. Instead, rinse your mouth with a warm saline solution or a hydrogen peroxide solution.
  3. Floss your teeth twice a day to prevent plaque build up. However be careful not to cut your gums.
  4. Avoid snacking between meals and cut back on your carbohydrate intake. Avoid added sugars as far as possible.
  5. Massage your gums with an oral irrigation device on a low setting. You could also put pressure on your gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water to relieve the bleeding.
  6. Consult your dentist to check that your braces, dentures etc. are well fitted and are not rubbing against your gums or causing sores.
  7. Avoid aspirin and other blood thinners.

In some cases, these home remedies may not be enough. If you experience severe or long-term bleeding or any other symptoms along with the bleeding, you must consult a dentist immediately. Your dentist will be able to clean your teeth and remove all plaque and tartar on the tooth enamel and under the gum line that may be causing the bleeding. The doctor will also be able to examine the positioning of your teeth to ensure that there is no alignment problem that is reducing the effectiveness of brushing or flossing. Your dentist may also give you a few suggestions on how to overcome this problem. Regular cleaning and dental examinations are crucial to reversing bleeding gums and the diseases associated with it.

Why Dental Health Check Ups Are So Important?

Dr. Srinivas Nalla 88% (53 ratings)
MDS - Orthodontics, BDS
Dentist, Hyderabad
Why Dental Health Check Ups Are So Important?

One of the major issues facing dentists, patients and patients wallets is that the majority of us don't visit the dentist on a regular basis.  More than a quarter of adults only visit the dentist when they have a problem.

The infrequency and irregularity of dental check-ups is causing a huge number of problems for us. The facts say a lot here with 31% of adults having tooth decay, 66% of us having visible plaque and 29% of the population suffering from regular pain in the mouth or teeth.

How Often Should You Visit the Dentist

      Both adults and children should visit the dentist regularly, as often as they recommend. For those with certain medical conditions, your dental team may want to see you more often.

    It is also important to remember that certain types of medication may impact our oral health too, for instance, patients who have ‘dry mouth' caused by medication may be more likely to get tooth decay and will need to visit their dental team more often.

Why Dental Check Ups Are So Important

   The problem we have is that many of us ignore the health of our mouth, especially when we compare it to our overall body health. We allow problems to develop before we actually visit the dentist.

There are a wide number of issues this creates but we have listed the two most common issues left unchecked;

      Allowing Gums to Bleed

        Allowing your gums to bleed helps create cavities and inflamed gums - pockets develop under the gum-line filled with bacteria that eat away the teeth and eventually the bone causing tooth loss. Visiting the dentist regularly can ensure your gum health is properly maintained and early treatment prevents serious problems developing.

    Tooth Pain

        Tooth pain is most often caused from cavities forming. Once a cavity reaches the stage where it is causing pain then root canal treatment (or possibly tooth loss) is more likely, or an extensive filling. Regular check-ups ensure that the beginnings of a filling can be identified, treated and additional brushing routines created. 

  Overall dental check-ups will dramatically decrease the potential for all oral health problems becoming serious. They are also cost effective compared to paying for expensive major dental works such as tooth replacements, crowns and gum repair.

Check Up Costs Are Low

      This includes a check of your teeth and gums and also covers basic treatments including scaling, polishing and the application of fluoride varnishes and fissure sealants. You will also receive advice on preventing issues developing and your brushing technique and habits.

Private dental check-ups are not significantly more expensive in most parts of the country.

Visiting the dentist should be a regular part of your schedule, just like a proper oral health routine. The benefits of check-ups far outweigh any minor inconveniences booking an appointment might cause!It's time to prioritise our oral health.

Snacks Between Meals!

Dr. Piyusha S Patil 89% (563 ratings)
MDS, BDS
Dentist, Bangalore
Snacks Between Meals!
  • Increased frequency of munching on snacks especially sugary and starchy foods will lead to plaque buildup on teeth which is the root cause of decay of teeth, gum bleeding and bad breath.
  • Limits snacks in between meals to help reduce plaque, maintain a fresh breath and good oral health.
  • After every feed swish or rinse your mouth with water to clean your teeth of the foods which are stuck.

Diabetes and Oral Health- Tips For Diabetics

Dr. Shelly 90% (93 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Delhi
Diabetes and Oral Health- Tips For Diabetics

We know that diabetes can harm your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in your body. But did you know it can also cause dental and gum problems in your mouth?

The link between diabetes and oral problems is real, though lesser known. Diabetics are at a higher risk for periodontal or gum disease which is an infection of the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place.

Untreated periodontal disease can lead to pain on chewing and even tooth loss, if it’s left untreated. Gum disease can also more severe and take longer to heal if you are a diabetic.

Research also shows that alternatively, periodontal disease may also make it hard for you to control your blood glucose.

If your diabetes is not under control, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth like-

  1. Dry mouth, a condition that happens when you do not have enough saliva—the fluid that keeps your mouth wet. It is a common symptom of undetected diabetes and can also cause mouth soreness, ulcers, infections, and tooth decay.
  2. Another problem diabetes can cause is a fungal infection called thrush or candidiasis because diabetes usually causes the glucose levels in your saliva to increase. And this encourages the fungus causing thrush to grow in your mouth, leading to painful white patches.
  3. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva also help harmful bacteria grow in your mouth. These bacteria combine with food particles to form a soft, sticky film called plaque which causes tooth decay. Plaque also comes from eating sugary and starchy foods.
  4. And some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities and other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath.
  5. Diabetics have a higher incidence of Gingivitis which causes unhealthy, red, inflamed gums. You need regular flossing as well as cleaning at the dentists to prevent it.

What can you do?

  1. You must keep your blood glucose under control to prevent mouth problems. Diabetics with poor blood glucose control get gum disease more often and more severely than diabetics whose blood sugar is under control.
  2. If you have diabetes, you should brush and floss every day and follow this up with regular dental check-ups.
  3. Call your dentist when you notice a problem in your mouth. Keep observing and checking your mouth regularly for any problems. Don’t ignore minor stuff like gum bleeding during brushing and flossing. And also notice dryness, soreness, white patches, or a bad taste in the mouth. All of these are big enough reasons to visit your dentist.
  4. Tell your dentist if your dentures suddenly don’t fit right or if your gums are sore.

Also, take care to quit smoking. Smoking makes gum disease worse and causes dry mouth which aggravates oral problems.

Needless to add, good blood glucose control is your best defence against the oral complications of diabetes like gum disease. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a dentist.

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Bleeding Gums After Scaling!

Dr. Anshumali Srivastava 91% (750 ratings)
BDS, MDS
Dentist, Gorakhpur
Bleeding Gums After Scaling!
  • Though bleeding from gums after deep scaling is normal in most of the cases and subsides after 2-3 hours without any conscious efforts, there are some patients whose gums tends to bleed more and often persists for longer than 72 hours depending upon severity of inflammation.
  • Prevention: when you face similar problem kindly inform your dentist. There is absolutely nothing to worry about. Just you have to prevent the clot to get dislodged from bleeding area. You can apply pressure gauze, black tea bag and can also use alums to rinse 3-4 times at home. 
  • Sometimes, those who are on blood thinner medications (aspirin) or anticoagulant therapy can also suffer with this problem. They should inform their dentist prior to undergo scaling.
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How Homeopathy Helps Treat Toothache?

Dr. Princy Khandelwal 90% (16067 ratings)
BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
How Homeopathy Helps Treat Toothache?

 

Tip Image

Odontalgia or severe toothache is characterized by extreme pain or inflammation of the tooth and its surrounding areas. The excruciating pain that you might experience may stem as a result of gum infection, tooth decay, infection of the dental pulp, abscess and due to certain other reasons like extraction or filling of the teeth. Another key reason for extreme toothache is the fact that a number of heart problems, such as myocardial infarction and angina tend to affect your dental health negatively.

While some toothaches might occur sporadically, they might pose a danger against your overall well-being in the long run, if the condition is left untreated. Homeopathy can serve as the perfect antidote to your toothache problems and its effects are noted to be significantly higher when it comes down to the question of long-term consumption. Here is a list of homeopathic medications that might prove to be a pain alleviator for your dental complications:

  1. Hepar Sulph and Silicea: Root abscess responds positively, to both Hepar Sulph and Silicea. For fever accompanied with occasional chills due to severe toothache, Hepar Sulph is considered to be the perfect remedy and tends to significantly decrease the level of swelling and pain. On the other hand, if your face swells and there is an incidence of gum inflammation, Silicea must be used to numb the effects of root abscess.
  2. Plantago: Plantago is noted to be the most commonly prescribed medicine for toothaches and for treating sensitivity. The pain extending to the ears from the teeth receives maximum relief due to the effects of Plantago. It might have to be taken internally or applied externally depending on the severity of the toothache and its accompanying conditions.
  3. Staphysagria: Sensitivity is best taken care of by Staphysagria and resolves the problem of worsening of toothache, when any drink or food is consumed. Bleeding gums and excess salivation is also another aspect that is looked after by Staphysagria.
  4. ArnicaTooth extraction and filling may often lead to the consequence of nerve-wrecking pain in the gums and the affected area. For this, Arnica is prescribed to assuage the nerve pain and must be taken in along with Hypericum, another homeopathy medicine, for best results.
  5. Merc Sol: Problems of halitosis and excessive salivation that tend to occur simultaneously with toothaches can be solved by a dosage of Merc Sol. Bleeding gums, looseness of teeth and sensitivity are all taken care of by the same medication.
  6. Hecla Lava: For jaw swells along with toothache, you must always opt for Hecla Lava. The effect is instantaneous and relieves both swelling and pain.
  7. Chamomilla: Chamomilla serves as the best remedial homeopathic medicine for easing heat sensitivity that is likely to worsen the existing toothache. Drinks and food, either hot or cold, can then be consumed easily because of the numbing effect of this medicine.

How Should Diabetic Patients Take Care Of Their Oral Health?

Dr. Shelly 90% (93 ratings)
BDS
Dentist, Delhi
How Should Diabetic Patients Take Care Of Their Oral Health?

If your diabetes is not under control, you are more likely to develop problems in your mouth. The good news is you can keep your teeth and gums healthy. By controlling your blood glucose, brushing and flossing every day, and visiting a dentist regularly, you can help prevent serious problems in your mouth.

The Symptoms of Untreated Diabetes

The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. 

If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how:

  1. You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. (Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.)
  2. Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities.
  3. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often (gingivitis).
  4. You may have problems tasting food.
  5. You may experience delayed wound healing.
  6. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth.
  7. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is typical.

Diabetes is a chronic, systemic disease and affects all parts of the body. While its effect on the nerves, eyes, kidneys, and skin is more common, their oral effects are less known. However, diabetes will vouch how they lost tooth and have dry mouth after their sugars went out of control.

  1. Oral Symptoms in Diabetics: There is a strong correlation between oral health and poorly controlled blood sugars. Some of the common oral indications of diabetes are as follows.
  2. Dry Mouth: There is less amount of saliva, which brings with it a whole lot of symptoms including soreness of the mucosa, ulcers, increased chances of infection, gum inflammation and tooth decay.
  3. Thrush: The saliva has higher sugar levels and attracts fungus (Candida in particular) which thrives in this dry, sugary environment. This produces a burning sensation in the mouth.
  4. Periodontal Disease: The gums get severely infected with gingival recession, where the gum line recedes exposing more of the tooth (tooth length seems to have increased). There is “pocket” formation, or space between the tooth and the gum which hosts a variety of bacteria. The periodontal ligament loses its strength to hold the tooth in place, and thereby teeth become mobile. If not worked upon in time, there could be multiple teeth lost.

Why People with Diabetes Are More Prone to Gum Disease

All people have more tiny bacteria living in their mouth now than there are people on this planet. If they make their home in your gums, you can end up with periodontal disease. This chronic, inflammatory disease can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is the most common dental disease affecting those living with diabetes, affecting nearly 22% of those diagnosed. Especially with increasing age, poor blood sugar control increases the risk for gum problems. In fact, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for gum problems because of poor blood sugar control. As with all infections, serious gum disease may cause blood sugar to rise. This makes diabetes harder to control because you are more susceptible to infections and are less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.

As much as it sounds alarming, it is not. There are easy, simple ways to manage these. In fact, good overall management of diabetes will ensure the oral symptoms are also maintained under control. Following are some things to do which will help in managing diabetes in general and the oral symptoms in particular:

As soon as diabetes is diagnosed, visit a dentist to take stock of the oral health condition. Any identified problem should be treated to avoid progression.

  1. Keep a close watch to ensure blood sugar remains as close to normal as possible.
  2. Switch to a toothbrush with soft or extra-soft bristles. This will help reduce the pressure on the gums and thereby prevent gum bleeding
  3. After every meal, remember to brush the teeth.
  4. Flossing at least once a day will help remove food deposits between the teeth. Alternately, use interdental brushes.
  5. Rinse at least twice daily using an antiseptic mouthwash.
  6. Denture-wearers should always clean them daily and never go to sleep with the denture in the mouth.
  7. Smoking with diabetics is a strict no-no, work on quitting at the earliest.
  8. Visit a dentist every 3 months to ensure oral issues are identified at the earliest and treatment done with minimal intervention.
  9. Any dental procedure should be done only when sugar levels are under control.

Managing diabetes is a lifelong commitment, and that includes proper dental care. Your efforts will be rewarded with a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Dentist.

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Pregnancy: The Second Trimester

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Pregnancy: The Second Trimester

The Second Trimester: What You Need to Know

  • During your second trimester prenatal visits, your health care provider will continue to check on your and your baby’s health, including monitoring the fetal heartbeat.

  • The second trimester is the most physically enjoyable for most women. Morning sickness usually lessens by this time, and the extreme tiredness and breast tenderness usually ease up.

  • Your fetus has now developed all its organs and systems and will now begin to grow in length and weight.

  • You may be able to feel the movement of the fetus for the first time at around 20 weeks. This phenomenon is called quickening.

  • A fetus born at the end of 24 weeks may survive in a neonatal intensive care unit.

Prenatal Visits During the Second Trimester

During your second and third trimester prenatal visits, your health care provider may check the following, depending on your current medical condition and the health of the fetus:

  • Any current symptoms or discomforts

  • Your weight

  • Your blood pressure

  • Urine test. This is done to find albumin, a protein that may indicate pre-eclampsia or toxemia, and glucose (which may indicate hyperglycemia).

  • Growth, size and development of the fetus

  • Size of the uterus. After approximately 12 weeks of gestation, the uterus can be felt through the abdominal wall.

  • Height of the fundus (top of the uterus), starting at 20 weeks of gestation

  • Fetal heartbeat

The Second Trimester: What to Expect

The second trimester marks a turning point for the mother and fetus. You will usually begin to feel better and start showing the pregnancy more. Your fetus has now developed all its organs and systems and will now begin growing in length and weight.

During the second trimester, the umbilical cord continues to thicken as it carries nourishment to the fetus. However, harmful substances also pass through the umbilical cord to the fetus, so care should be taken to avoid alcohol, tobacco and other known hazards.

During the second trimester, both your body and the fetus continue to grow.

 

The Second Trimester: Changes to Your Body

The second trimester is the most physically enjoyable for most women. Morning sickness usually lessens by this time, and the extreme tiredness and breast tenderness usually ease up. These changes can be attributed to a decrease in levels of human chorionic gonadotropin hormone and an adjustment to the levels of estrogen and progesterone hormones.

The following is a list of changes and symptoms that may happen during the second trimester:

  • Appetite may increase.

  • You may be able to feel the movement of the fetus for the first time around 20 weeks. This phenomenon is called quickening.

  • The uterus grows to the height of the bellybutton around 20 weeks, making the pregnancy visible.

  • The skin on the belly may itch as it grows, and there may be pain down the sides of the body as the uterus stretches. The lower stomach may ache as ligaments stretch to support the uterus.

  • The need to urinate often may decrease as the uterus grows out of the pelvic cavity, relieving pressure on the bladder.

  • Your nose may become congested, and you may experience nosebleeds. This is due to the increase in hormones (estrogen and progesterone) and blood flow that affect the mucous membranes and blood vessels in the nose.

  • Your gums become spongier and may bleed easily. This is due to the increase in hormones (estrogen and progesterone) that affect the mucous membranes in the mouth.

  • Varicose veins and hemorrhoids may appear.

  • You may have a white-colored vaginal discharge called leukorrhea. (A colored or bloody discharge may signal possible complications and should be examined immediately.)

  • The increasing weight gain may cause backaches.

  • Skin pigmentation may change on the face or abdomen due to the pregnancy hormones.

  • Heart burn, indigestion and constipation may continue.

The Second Trimester: Fetal Development

 

Fetal growth from weeks eight through 40 is depicted visually in this chart.

Click Image to Enlarge

 

Now that all the major organs and systems have formed in the fetus, the following six months will be spent growing. The weight of your fetus will multiply more than seven times over the next few months, as the fetus becomes a baby that can survive outside of the uterus.

By the end of the second trimester, your fetus will be about 13 to 16 inches long and weigh about 2 to 3 pounds. Fetal development during the second trimester includes the following:

  • The fetus kicks, moves and can turn from side to side.

  • The eyes have been gradually moving to the front of the face, and the ears have moved from the neck to the sides of the head. The fetus can hear your voice.

  • A creamy white substance (called vernix caseosa, or simply vernix) begins to appear on the fetus and helps to protect the thin fetal skin. Vernix is gradually absorbed by the skin, but some may be seen on babies even after birth.

  • The fetus is developing reflexes, like swallowing and sucking.

  • The fetus can respond to certain stimuli.

  • The placenta is fully developed.

  • The brain will undergo its most important period of growth from the fifth month on.

  • Fingernails have grown on the tips of the fingers and toes, and the fingers and toes are fully separated.

  • The fetus goes through cycles of sleep and wakefulness.

  • Skin is wrinkly and red, covered with soft, downy hair (called lanugo).

  • Hair is growing on the head of the fetus.

  • Fat begins to accumulate in the fetus.

  • Eyelids are beginning to open, and the eyebrows and eyelashes are visible.

  • Fingerprints and toeprints have formed.

  • Rapid growth is continuing in fetal size and weight.

  • The 20th week marks the halfway point of the pregnancy.

A fetus born at the end of 24 weeks may survive in a neonatal intensive care unit.

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