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Bladder Infections Health Feed

Prolapsed Bladder - What Can Cause It?

Prolapsed Bladder - What Can Cause It?

Bladder prolapse is a condition wherein a woman’s vaginal wall ceases to adequately support the urinary bladder. The front wall of the vagina gives support to the bladder under normal circumstances but when this wall weakens, it allows the bladder to droop and become prolapsed. This can lead to a wide range of medical problems such as urinary difficulties, stress incontinence (leakage of urine while coughing or sneezing), pain and discomfort, etc.

Prolapsed bladders are generally associated with menopause. Also known as cystoceles or fallen bladders, they are categorized into four different types depending on the extent to which the bladder has prolapsed.
 

Grade 1: This is the mild stage wherein a small portion of the bladder droops into the vagina.
Grade 2: This is the moderate stage in which the bladder droops far enough to reach the opening of the vagina.
Grade 3: This is when the condition becomes severe and the bladder protrudes from the body through the opening of the vagina.
Grade 4: This occurs when the bladder has completely prolapsed. The entire bladder protrudes outside the vagina and is normally associated with other forms of pelvic organ prolapse such as uterine prolapse (the sagging of the uterus from its normal spot) and rectocele (prolapse of the wall between the vagina and the rectum).

What are the causes of prolapsed bladders?

Following are the factors that lead to the condition of prolapsed bladders:

  1. Menopause: The vaginal walls are known to become weak upon the onset of menopause. This occurs because the body inhibits the production of oestrogen, the hormone that renders strength to the muscles of the vagina. As a result, the bladder is no longer supported by the vagina.
  2. Childbirth: The process of childbirth puts a tremendous amount of stress on the vagina and often leads to deterioration of the muscles of the vaginal wall. This in turn leads to the condition of prolapsed bladder.
  3. Straining: Anything that puts strain on the walls of the vagina can lead to this condition. This includes lifting heavy objects, chronic constipation, obesity, excessive coughing and sneezing or any other factor that damages the pelvic floor.

What are the symptoms of a prolapsed bladder?

Symptoms of a prolapsed bladder vary from case to case, depending on the category and extent of the condition. Some of the most commonly experienced symptoms of the condition are as follows:

Tissue sticking out of the vagina (that may be tender and/or bleeding)

  1. Frequent urge to urinate
  2. Urinary incontinence (unwanted leakage of urine)
  3. Pain during urination
  4. Pain during sex
  5. Frequent urinary tract and bladder infections
  6. Pain in the vagina, pelvis, lower abdomen or lower back
  7. Incomplete urination
3999 people found this helpful

Gall Bladder Surgery - What Are The Risks Of It?

Gall Bladder Surgery - What Are The Risks Of It?

Surgery using a laparoscope is the most common way to remove the gallbladder. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that lets the doctor see inside our belly. It is a minimally invasive surgery in which small incisions and specialized tools are used to remove a diseased or infected gallbladder.

The gall bladder is a small organ that sits right under the liver and is credited with bile storage, which can help the body in breaking down various kinds of fats that enter it. So, what all do you need to know about this operation? Read this list.

Reasons for Gall Bladder Operation: The gall bladder is not a very efficient organ. It can lead to blockages and choking as the bile it stores can become very thick and difficult to handle. Also, this bile can start to harbour deposits that are hardball like substances, usually known as gall bladder stones. The size of these stones can vary from the size of a grain to the size of a golf ball. 

Further, these gall bladder stones can cause infections which can lead to symptoms like nausea, vomiting, bloating and more. Another reason can also be the gall bladder disease known as cholelithiasis, which can cause abdominal pain. Inflammation in the pancreas, also known as pancreatitis, can lead to gall bladder open removal surgery.

Risk: While the gall bladder removal surgery is usually considered a safe one, with little or no complications, there are risks attached to this surgery too. These include sudden and excessive bleeding and the creation of blood clots, allergic reactions to the drugs used as well as anaesthesia, blood vessel damage, accelerated heart rate which leads to an increased risk of contracting a heart attack or heart disease, infections, inflammation or swelling in the pancreas, and injuries caused to the bile duct during surgery.

You might also need this type of surgery if you have the following:

1. Biliary dyskinesia, which occurs when the gallbladder doesn't fill or empty correctly due to a defect
2. Choledocholithiasis, which occurs when gallstones move to the bile duct and potentially cause a blockage that prevents the gallbladder from draining
3. Cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder
4. Pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

Laparoscopic surgery is preferred over open cholecystectomy surgery because the smaller incisions that are made reduce your risk of infection, bleeding, and recovery time.

Preparation: To prepare for your gall bladder removal surgery, the doctor may ask you to have a prescription fluid so that your bowels are flushed clean. You may also be asked to fast for at least six hours before the surgery so that there is no hindrance to the same. Also, the use of antibacterial soap to bathe is usually prescribed so that the risk of contracting infections decreases.

While this surgery can be a simple one, you will have to take due care after the surgery to ensure that the recovery is fast and virtually pain-free.

2850 people found this helpful

I have an overactive bladder problem and I am diabetes this problem is not curable according to internet information. I am in fear please help I am talking some medicine but improvement is very less.

I have an overactive bladder problem and I am diabetes this problem is not curable according to internet information....
Is it overactive bladder or just frequent urination due to diabetes. Two are different. Both are fully treatable. You may visit us or consult online for safe effective homeopathic treatment.
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Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery - All You Should Be Knowing!

Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery - All You Should Be Knowing!

What is Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)?

Gallbladder removal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Gallbladder removal surgery is usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy or Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal.

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Removal of the gallbladder is not associated with any impairment of digestion in most people.

What Causes Gallbladder Problems?

Gallbladder problems are usually caused by the presence of gallstones which are usually small and hard, consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct.

It is uncertain why some people form gallstones but risk factors include being female, prior pregnancy, age over 40 years and being overweight. Gallstones are also more common as you get older and some people may have a family history of gallstones. There is no known means to prevent gallstones.

These stones may block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal painvomitingindigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (a yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Diagnosing 

  1. Ultrasound is most commonly used to find gallstones.
  2. In a few more complex cases, other X-ray test such as a CT scan or a gallbladder nuclear medicine scan may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed. Treatments to break up or dissolve gallstones are largely unsuccessful.

Surgical removal of the gallbladder is the time-honored and safest treatment of gallbladder disease.

What are the Advantages of Performing Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal?

  1. Rather than a five to seven inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.
  2. Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.
  3. Patients usually experience faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.
  4. Most patients go home the same day of the surgery and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

Are you a Candidate?

Although there are many advantages to laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy), the procedure may not be appropriate for some patients who have severe complicated gallbladder disease or previous upper abdominal surgery. A thorough medical evaluation by your personal physician, in consultation with a surgeon trained in laparoscopy, can determine if laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy) is an appropriate procedure for you.

2844 people found this helpful

Gall Bladder Surgery - Why Is It Required?

Gall Bladder Surgery - Why Is It Required?

Surgery using a laparoscope is the most common way to remove the gallbladder. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that lets the doctor see inside our belly. It is a minimally invasive surgery in which small incisions and specialized tools are used to remove a diseased or infected gallbladder.

The gall bladder is a small organ that sits right under the liver and is credited with bile storage, which can help the body in breaking down various kinds of fats that enter it. So, what all do you need to know about this operation? Read this list.

Reasons for Gall Bladder Operation: The gall bladder is not a very efficient organ. It can lead to blockages and choking as the bile it stores can become very thick and difficult to handle. Also, this bile can start to harbour deposits that are hardball like substances, usually known as gall bladder stones. The size of these stones can vary from the size of a grain to the size of a golf ball. 

Further, these gall bladder stones can cause infections which can lead to symptoms like nausea, vomiting, bloating and more. Another reason can also be the gall bladder disease known as cholelithiasis, which can cause abdominal pain. Inflammation in the pancreas, also known as pancreatitis, can lead to gall bladder open removal surgery.

Risk: While the gall bladder removal surgery is usually considered a safe one, with little or no complications, there are risks attached to this surgery too. These include sudden and excessive bleeding and the creation of blood clots, allergic reactions to the drugs used as well as anaesthesia, blood vessel damage, accelerated heart rate which leads to an increased risk of contracting a heart attack or heart disease, infections, inflammation or swelling in the pancreas, and injuries caused to the bile duct during surgery.

You might also need this type of surgery if you have the following:

1. biliary dyskinesia, which occurs when the gallbladder doesn't fill or empty correctly due to a defect
2. choledocholithiasis, which occurs when gallstones move to the bile duct and potentially cause a blockage that prevents the gallbladder from draining
3. cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder
4. pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

Laparoscopic surgery is preferred over open cholecystectomy surgery because the smaller incisions that are made reduce your risk of infection, bleeding, and recovery time.

Preparation: To prepare for your gall bladder removal surgery, the doctor may ask you to have a prescription fluid so that your bowels are flushed clean. You may also be asked to fast for at least six hours before the surgery so that there is no hindrance to the same. Also, the use of antibacterial soap to bathe is usually prescribed so that the risk of contracting infections decreases.

While this surgery can be a simple one, you will have to take due care after the surgery to ensure that the recovery is fast and virtually pain-free.

2829 people found this helpful

Can a urologist determine the overactive level of the bladder from the biopsy report of inner wall tissue of the bladder?

Can a urologist determine the overactive level of the bladder from the biopsy report of inner wall tissue of the blad...
The overactive level of the bladder is diagnosed from history and examination and biopsy is not essential.
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I have bladder pain. Due to urine controlled. Could not urine sensitive. I should take anti spasmodic medicine but which brand medicine?

I have bladder pain. Due to urine controlled. Could not urine sensitive. I should take anti spasmodic medicine but wh...
Hello. Before taking any anti spasmodic or other medicines, you must be confirm with the diagnosis of the problem. If the pain persists, better take consultation from a doctor. For further treatment you can ask me through private questions.
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Interstitial Cystitis (IC) - Know Symptoms Of It!

Interstitial Cystitis (IC) - Know Symptoms Of It!

Interstitial cystitis (IC), also known as painful bladder syndrome, is a difficult condition. It is difficult to diagnose and though there are treatments that can make life easier, there is no long-term cure. Interstitial cystitis is a lifelong bladder problem, that causes pressure and pain below the belly button. Symptoms can be constant, or they may fluctuate. It causes painful and urgent trips to the bathroom. In severe cases, you may need to urinate about 40 to 60 times in a day.

What causes interstitial cystitis (IC)?

The bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that holds the urine your body needs to dispose. The reason why IC occurs isn’t that clear, but there a few ideas:
1. An issue with bladder tissue allows chemicals in your urine to irritate the bladder.
2. Chemicals that are released when there is an inflammation in your body can cause the symptoms.
3. The bladder can be attacked by your immune system
4. Substances in your urine can damage your bladder
5. Nerve problems can wreak havoc on your bladder

Signs and Symptoms

People suffering from IC don’t display the same symptoms. The symptoms keep changing, be it every day, every week or every month. Sometimes, the symptoms may entirely disappear without treatment.
 

Some common IC symptoms include:

1. Bladder pressure and pain that worsens after the bladder gets filled with urine

2. Pain in your urethra (the tube that drains the urine from your bladder), pelvis, lower back and lower tummy

3. Women experience vaginal pain (or the area behind it) or in the vulva

4. In men, a sensation of pain in the penis, testicles, scrotum or the region behind the scrotum

5. The urge to urinate, even if you had urinated a few moments ago

6. Women experience pain during intercourse

7. Men experience pain after sex or during orgasm

One common symptom shared by all people suffering from IC is a swollen bladder. There are certain things that can worsen your condition. These include:
1. Certain drinks or foods

2. Physical or mental stress

3. Menstrual cycles

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Gall Bladder Attack - How To Track It?

Gall Bladder Attack - How To Track It?

The gall bladder, which sits just below the rib cage to the right of the stomach, is very tender to touch. It is a little sac or storage compartment for bile, which is produced by the liver. The gallbladder emits bile into the small intestines via a duct referred to as the cystic duct. The entire process is meant to break down foods (namely fatty foods). 

Gallbladder attack symptoms may include one or more of the following:

-Pain in the back right shoulder blade:

Sometimes, pain radiates through to the back shoulder blade on the right side or in the middle between the shoulder blades. This is pain from the gallbladder affecting the back of the shoulder. This back shoulder blade chest pain is one of the most common yet unknown symptoms of a gallbladder disorder. This can come and go or be constant. It may be sharp, excruciating or dull. It may also occur especially at night. A gallbladder attack will typically last for one to four hours.

-Pain in the stomach

The most common symptom of a gallbladder problem is pain. This pain usually occurs in the mid to upper-right section of your abdomen. It can be mild and intermittent, or it can be quite severe and frequent. In some cases, the pain will begin to radiate to other areas of the body, including the back and chest.

-Nausea or Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms among all types of gallbladder problems. But only a chronic gallbladder disease may cause digestive problems, such as acid reflux, gas, nausea, and vomiting.

-Diarrhea:

Having more than four bowel movements a day for at least three months may be a sign of chronic gallbladder disease.

-Fever or Chills:

An unexplained fever may signal that you have a bile duct infection. If you have an infection, you need treatment before it worsens and becomes dangerous. The infection can become life-threatening if it's allowed to spread to other parts of the body.

-Unusual Stools or Urine

Lighter-colored stools and dark urine are possible signs of a common bile duct block.
 

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