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Benefits of Triticale And Its Side Effects Health Feed

Food Allergies - How To Deal With Them?

Dr. Arif Yunus 88% (203 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Tropical Medicine Health, MRCP(UK)
Allergist/Immunologist, Hyderabad
Food Allergies - How To Deal With Them?

Food allergies can be defined as a sign of danger given by the human body when it considers some particular food items as harmful. This is basically an allergic reaction to some food proteins. As per the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about 4 to 6 percent of kids and 4 percent of adults worldwide are affected by different types of food allergies. The most interesting fact about the food allergies is that you can develop an allergy to a particular food at any age. Also, one can develop an allergy to a particular food even when you have been eating that food with ease all these years.

Food allergies can be categorized into main types:

  • Immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated allergies: These allergies occur mostly in infants and children and can be seen for milk, peanuts, eggs, soy, and wheat. Moreover, the affected body areas include mouth, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and gut.
  • Non-IgE mediated food allergies: These allergies normally affect the digestive tract and symptoms of these food allergies take a long time to develop.
  • Let us have a detailed look at different methods that can assist you in dealing with different food allergies.

Remove food items that can trigger allergy
It is obvious that food allergy is pertaining to a particular food and thus it is advisable to remove the triggering food items from your diet. It is also advised to remove the byproducts of such food items. This will minimize the danger of food allergy. There are some common food items which can trigger the food allergies which are:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Wheat
  • Fish
  • Peanut as well as tree nuts such as walnuts
  • Shellfish
  • Soy

Try to stock your pantry with alternatives to the allergic food items. There is no need to make your taste buds suffer by removing food items which can activate allergies. You can try alternatives to such food items and have a healthy life. Read the label on food while shopping for groceries as most of the triggering ingredients are common in many of the food items. Thus, it is advisable to read the ingredients on the food labels before you buy them. You can also look for these common names for allergens:

  • Glucosamine for Shellfish
  • Flour, triticale, durum, vital wheat gluten for wheat
  • Natto, tempeh, shoyu, miso, Edamame, for soy
  • Roe, surimi, nuoc mam, fish gelatin for fish
  • Rennet casein, tagatose, whey, rennet casein, casein in milk
  • Lysozyme, vitelline, surimi, albumin, livetin, globulin, and lysozyme for egg

Write down your meal plans
Preparing your own meal can minimize the risk of food allergies. Thus, try to make your own food and keep a memo of what you would like to eat in a meal. This way you can eliminate the dishes which include triggering ingredients. These above-mentioned methods can surely help you in preventing food allergies effectually. However, if the symptoms of food allergies are severe, do not hesitate to take medical help.

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Food To Eat And Avoid In Celiac Disease!

Dt. Neha Suryawanshi 91% (14205 ratings)
M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai

Allowed foods in celiac disease are: 

Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free:

  • Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form
  • Fresh eggs
  • Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated)
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Most dairy products

It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet, such as:


Always avoid these foods with celiac

Avoid all food and drinks containing:

  • Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley)
  • Rye
  • Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
  • Wheat

Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. 

Here are other wheat products to avoid:

  • Durum flour
  • Farina
  • Graham flour
  • Kamut
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Avoid unless labeled'gluten-free'

In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain:

  • Beer
  • Breads
  • Cakes and pies
  • Candies
  • Cereals
  • Communion wafers
  • Cookies and crackers
  • Croutons
  • French fries
  • Gravies
  • Imitation meat or seafood
  • Matzo
  • Pastas
  • Processed luncheon meats
  • Salad dressings
  • Sauces, including soy sauce
  • Seasoned rice mixes
  • Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips
  • Self-basting poultry
  • Soups and soup bases
  • Vegetables in sauce

Certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free.

You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include:

Food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others
Medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent.

3 people found this helpful

What r the whole grain food. Is brown rice whole grain. Is this good for consume in break fast for weight loss?

Diet Clinic 92% (2512 ratings)
B.Sc.(Hons), P.G.Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Gurgaon
What r the whole grain food. Is brown rice whole grain. Is this good for consume in break fast for weight loss?
Rice growing in fields and paddies has three edible parts – the bran, the germ, and the endosperm – just like all other whole grains. Most of us think of “brown rice” as being synonymous with whole grain rice, but in fact whole grain rice can be many different colors, depending on the variety of rice. Avoid eating rice at breakfast. If you want to loose weight then start having fibre in you breakfast, eat fruits, drink plenty of water. Rest for a proper balanced diet chart, you can contact us or provide your details too.
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Gluten Free Diet

Dt. Neha Suryawanshi 91% (14205 ratings)
M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Gluten Free Diet

Allowed foods - Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free like beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form fresh eggs, fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated), Fruits and vegetables, most dairy products. It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet such as: amaranth arrowroot buckwheat corn and cornmeal flax, gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean), hominy (corn). Millet quinoa rice, sorghum Soy, tapioca Ttff needs to be avoided.  Avoid all food and drinks containing: barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley), rye Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye), wheat. Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are other wheat products to avoid: durum flour, farina graham flour, kamut semolina spelt avoid unless labeled'gluten-free'. In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain. Beer, breads, cakes and pies, candies and cereals, communion wafers, cookies and crackers, croutons French fries, gravies imitation meat or seafood Matzo, pastas, processed luncheon meats, salad dressing sauces, including soy sauce, seasoned rice mixes, seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips, self-basting poultry Soups and soup bases Vegetables in sauce, certain grains, such as oats, can be contaminated with wheat during growing and processing stages of production. For this reason, doctors and dietitians generally recommend avoiding oats unless they are specifically labeled gluten-free. You should also be alert for other products that you eat or that could come in contact with your mouth that may contain gluten. These include: food additives, such as malt flavoring, modified food starch and others medications and vitamins that use gluten as a binding agent.

15 people found this helpful

I have got multiple sclerosis. Could you help me by telling me about the diet requirements for an Ms. patient.

Dr. Jyoti Goel 91% (6398 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma in Nutrition and Health Education (DNHE), Diploma in Clinical Cosmetology
General Physician, Noida
I have got multiple sclerosis. Could you help me by telling me about the diet requirements for an Ms. patient.
The development of MS has been associated with: a. an increased presence of antigliadin antibodies typical of gluten intolerance. b. low blood levels of vitamin D. c. low blood levels of antioxidants. d. high intakes of saturated fat so better to avoid high in animal fat or saturated fat Take gluten-free diet, which eliminates all wheat, rye, barley, and triticale foods, take diet rich in antioxidants consult for further guidance
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Tell me any Natural substitute products like egg, milk, horlicks etc instead of kabipro vanilla powder.

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist,
Tell me any Natural substitute products like egg, milk, horlicks etc instead of kabipro vanilla powder.
Milks • Soymilk: Of all the dairy-free milk alternatives, soymilk is likely the most recognizable to your clients and also the most widely available in grocery stores today. “Like rice milk, soymilk isn’t technically a milk; it’s a liquid extract of soybeans,” Levy explains. “Since it doesn’t contain any lactose, soymilk often is used as a substitute for people with lactose intolerance. And, because it’s derived from a plant source, it’s also a popular cow’s milk substitute.” Soymilk also gets good marks for healthfulness, especially for its protein content. “Soymilk contains the most protein of all the nondairy alternatives, with [6 to] 10 g per cup,” Batayneh says. “It also contains omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. And most are fortified with calcium, riboflavin, and vitamins A, D, and B12.” “Notably, soyfoods are the only plant-based complete protein source and are therefore the preferred dairy substitute,” and they’re vegan friendly, adds Levy, noting that soymilk is also a good source of manganese and magnesium. Various soymilk brands are available at grocery chains and health food stores nationwide, with Silk and Earth Balance being two popular choices. For clients looking to save a buck, have them keep an eye out for grocery store chain brands, such as those from Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods Market. Soymilk, like most other dairy-free milks, comes in unsweetened and sweetened varieties, but Batayneh suggests choosing “the unsweetened version for a smaller sugar hit.” • Rice milk: Rice milk, made from boiled rice, brown rice syrup, and brown rice starch, is another popular alternative for clients suffering from lactose intolerance, Levy says. “Rice milk generally tastes sweeter than cow’s milk, owing to the addition of sweeteners and vanilla in order to make it taste more like cow’s milk,” he says. Compared with dairy milk, the rice variety has considerably less protein (only 1 g) and a very small amount of natural calcium, though most brands are calcium fortified and enriched with vitamins A, D, and B12. “It’s also much higher in carbohydrates, with 24 g,” Batayneh says. “On the plus side, it’s probably the most hypoallergenic of all dairy alternatives.” Rice milk comes in plain, vanilla, and chocolate varieties and can be found at most major grocery stores and health food stores, especially organic grocery stores, though Levy warns of its higher price tag. Have clients test out brands until they find one with a taste and texture they prefer, though Dority says Rice Dream is generally a well-liked and commercially available brand. • Potato milk: Potato milk is one of the newer dairy-free milk alternatives and therefore more difficult to find commercially than rice or soymilks, Dority says. “It appears to be most commonly sold in powdered form,” she says. Like rice milk, potato milk is high in carbohydrates but low in protein, though it’s usually fortified with calcium and vitamins. It’s also gluten and casein free. “Made from just potatoes and water, it’s suitable for those on a gluten-free diet,” Batayneh says. Since it’s a new kid on the dairy-free block, Batayneh suggests clients look for it on the Internet (it’s mostly available via websites), though she notes it tends to be expensive. • Almond milk: Almond milk, another alternative, is made from ground almonds, water, and a small amount of sweetener. And while it can be formulated to have a taste and texture similar to cow’s milk, Levy says it’s lacking in many of the nutritive qualities. “Almond milk is much less calorically dense, typically containing only about a third of the calories of 2% cow’s milk,” he says. “Moreover, it contains very little protein, and almond milk is devoid of most B vitamins, lacks many essential trace elements, including zinc and copper, and contains little, if any, of the essential fatty acids.” Because of this, Levy says it should be used accordingly, noting it may not be appropriate for parents shopping for a milk substitute for infant formulas. However, Batayneh says many of her clients find the taste of almond milk more enjoyable than other substitutes, and it can be found in most grocery stores and health food stores in the refrigerated and nonrefrigerated sections. “A unique aspect of the nutritional profile of almond milk is that 1 cup of almond milk may contain roughly 50% of the DV [Daily Value] for vitamin E,” says Dority, noting that Almond Breeze is one popular and commercially available brand. • Oat, hemp, and coconut milks: Oat milk, which is made from oat groats, water, and potentially other grains and beans, such as triticale, barley, brown rice, and soybeans, has a mild flavor and is slightly sweet, which makes it a good substitute for low-fat or skim milk, according to Dority. Low in overall calories, cholesterol, and saturated fat, it’s high in fiber and iron and contains both vitamin E and folic acid, says Batayneh, who cautions against its use by clients with a gluten sensitivity. Hemp milk, typically made from hulled hemp seeds, water, and a sweetener, contains higher amounts of protein and omega-3 fatty acids but lacks calcium. “It’s a good alternative for those with gluten, nut, and soy allergies,” Batayneh says, though it’s not widely available. “Coconut milk is higher in calories and fat than most milk or milk alternatives, and it contains fiber and iron, two notable differences in the nutritional profile compared to cow’s milk,” says Dority, who cautions that its strong flavor may limit its use for some clients. “Coconut milk contains 5 g of saturated fat per serving, but research has shown that the specific saturated fats in coconut oil may actually be beneficial,” Batayneh says. For dairy-free clients who are cooking aficionados, Batayneh says almond and coconut milks are generally best for baking “because their nutty flavors blend well with the sweetness in baking.” She recommends soymilk for savory dishes, “especially Asian ones, because it can leave a slightly ‘beany’ taste.” She cautions against using rice milk in recipes due to its watery texture. Cheeses • Cream cheese: There are numerous soy cream cheeses on the market, which tend to be the most popular dairy-free versions, including those made by Tofutti, Galaxy Nutritional Foods, and Trader Joe’s. According to Batayneh, these soy-based varieties have similar tastes and textures to regular cream cheese, which is why consumers like them, but they also can be more processed, as many contain thickeners such as maltodextrin. “There are recipes for homemade versions, like almond cream cheese,” she says, for clients with the time and initiative to try making their own varieties. • Sour cream: Soy-based sour creams are the most widely available dairy-free alternative to sour cream, though clients likely will have to go to a health food store to find them. Batayneh says Tofutti, Galaxy Nutritional Foods, and Moonomor all make soy-based sour creams. Dority likes Tofutti’s version due to its taste and texture. “Other varieties are harder to find, but there are many recipes for homemade dairy-free sour cream, and most are cashew based.” • Regular cheese: “Due to the various sensory characteristics associated with cheese, it appears that dairy-free cheese is the most difficult to substitute,” says Dority, adding that dairy-free cheeses often don’t mimic the mouthfeel, taste, and meltability of dairy cheeses. Soy cheeses tend to be the most common and widely available. “Brands such as Teese, Sheese, and Vegan Gourmet are popular choices and have received good reviews,” Batayneh says. For clients with other food allergies, she recommends Daiya cheeses. “Daiya makes a variety of cheeses, from cheddar and pepperjack to mozzarella and havarti. Daiya cheeses are soy, dairy, gluten, and nut free, making them a great choice for those with allergies.” For another alternative, Dr. Cow makes nut-based cheeses using cashews and macadamia nuts. “These can be found in health food stores and some major grocery stores as well as bought online,” Batayneh says. Desserts • Ice cream: Dority says rice-based ice creams are a popular alternative due to their sweetness, noting that Rice Dream is a popular brand. “Soy-based ice cream also is easy to find in stores,” she says. Batayneh’s pick for a nondairy sweet treat is NadaMoo! “It’s made with coconut milk and agave,” she says. In addition to being dairy free, this brand is also organic, gluten free, vegan, and fair trade. “Compared to other varieties, NadaMoo! has fewer calories and grams of sugar per serving.” So Delicious offers soy, almond, and coconut milk-based ice creams, available in various flavors and chocolate-covered ice cream and fudge bars (with a mini version with fewer calories). Those on a dairy-free diet also can enjoy most sorbets and fruit-based icy treats that are naturally dairy free. • Whipped cream: Batayneh says the market for dairy-free whipped cream is relatively small, so clients will have to go to health food stores to find it. She says Soyatoo! Whip Topping is a popular soy- and rice-based variety, and MimicCreme Healthy Top Whipping Cream is a good nut-based alternative. Rich Whip Non-Dairy Whip Topping is another whipped cream alternative for clients going dairy free. However, just because they’re free of dairy doesn’t mean they’re necessarily the best options for clients. “These options are all relatively processed, and Rich Whip contains high fructose corn syrup and partially hydrogenated oil,” Batayneh says. For a less processed topping for a slice of summer peach pie, suggest clients make their own. “A popular alternative is making homemade whipped cream using coconut milk,” says Dority, who refers clients to the Internet for coconut-, almond-, or cashew-based whipped cream recipes. • Cheesecake and other sweets: Dairy-free cheesecakes can be difficult to find in stores, Batayneh says, so she directs clients to specialty bakeries, which may be more likely to carry them. There are also several online retailers offering dairy-free cheesecakes, including The Raw Vegan and Vegan Essentials. “Earth Café, which is sold at Whole Foods Market and Vitamin Cottage as well as a few other natural health food stores, also makes a line of vegan, gluten-free cheesecakes in addition to other desserts,” Batayneh adds. There are numerous specialty bakeries that make vegan and otherwise dairy-free sweets, and many ship nationwide. Isabella’s Cookie Company is one such bakery that offers vegan cookie options. Snacks • Yogurts: Soy-, coconut-, and nut-based yogurts all can be found in major grocery stores and health food stores, with soy-based versions being the most readily available. Batayneh’s favorite varieties include WholeSoy & Co, which she says comes in 12 flavors and tastes similar to regular yogurt. “It also contains vegan probiotics,” she says. She also likes Nu Lait Dairy Free Yogurt, which is coconut or almond based and soy, gluten, and allergen free. • Smoothies: Major smoothie brands, including Odwalla and Naked, carry dairy-free products, so Batayneh tells clients to look for Odwalla Smoothie Refreshers and Naked Oat Smoothies to quench their thirst sans dairy. These typically can be found at grocery stores and health food stores nationwide. For homemade smoothies, Dority says rice milk has a natural (or added) sweetness that tends to complement the other ingredients in a smoothie. “Depending on the additional ingredients, both coconut and almond milk might provide a unique flavor. Spreads • Butter: For dairy-free butter spreads, various soy-based options are available. Batayneh says Earth Balance is likely the most well known and widely available. “They offer a variety of spreads, including original, olive oil, soy free, soy garden, and whipped. All are vegan, gluten free, trans fat free, non-GMO, and made with expeller-pressed oils.” Clients who like the taste of Earth Balance may like its butter sticks, which are especially useful for baking. “Smart Balance also makes spreadable butters made with a ‘natural oil blend’ of palm fruit, canola, soybean, and olive oils,” Batayneh says. “Smart Balance products contain omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins A and E, and are free of trans fats and gluten.” For clients who want a texture similar to real butter and don’t mind a slightly nutty undertone, coconut and cashew butters, such as those made by Nutiva and Artisana, may be good choices for them. • Margarines: Different kinds of dairy-free margarine options are available, though not all are equal in nutritional value. Mother’s Margarine and Fleischmann’s Light are two options, but Batayneh cautions that some dairy-free margarines can contain trans fats, so make sure clients read food labels before buying them. One variety that has no trans fats is Earth Balance’s Organic Coconut Spread, which Batayneh says tastes similar to margarine and is also soy free.

I am allergic to gluten what all are the diet restrictions I need to follow in detail please answer also a detailed diet chart would do.

Dt. Neetha Dilip 89% (3545 ratings)
M. Sc. Foods, Nutrition & Dietetics, B.Sc-Home Science
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Visakhapatnam
I am allergic to gluten what all are the diet restrictions I need to follow in detail please answer also a detailed d...
A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, and a cross between wheat and rye called triticale. A gluten-free diet is primarily used to treat celiac disease. Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications. Allowed foods Many healthy and delicious foods are naturally gluten-free: Beans, seeds and nuts in their natural, unprocessed form Fresh eggs Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-coated or marinated) Fruits and vegetables Most dairy products It's important to make sure that they are not processed or mixed with gluten-containing grains, additives or preservatives. Many grains and starches can be part of a gluten-free diet, such as: Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Corn and cornmeal Flax Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato, bean) Hominy (corn) Millet Quinoa Rice Sorghum Soy Tapioca Teff Always avoid Avoid all food and drinks containing: Barley (malt, malt flavoring and malt vinegar are usually made from barley) Rye Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye) Wheat Avoiding wheat can be challenging because wheat products go by numerous names. Consider the many types of wheat flour on supermarket shelves — bromated, enriched, phosphated, plain and self-rising. Here are other wheat products to avoid: Durum flour Farina Graham flour Kamut Semolina Spelt Avoid unless labeled'gluten-free' In general, avoid the following foods unless they're labeled as gluten-free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain: Beer Breads Cakes and pies Candies Cereals Communion wafers Cookies and crackers Croutons French fries Gravies Imitation meat or seafood Matzo Pastas Processed luncheon meats Salad dressings Sauces, including soy sauce Seasoned rice mixes Seasoned snack foods, such as potato and tortilla chips Self-basting poultry Soups and soup bases Vegetables in sauce.
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Dr. Sajeev Kumar 94% (26629 ratings)
C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Besan or gram flour has health benefits

If you are in doubt that your food may be the cause of your illness, try substituting one food each day. To begin with, its best to use besan (gram flour) in place of wheat flour .
People suffering from celiac disease cannot digest a protein called gluten, which is found in barley and wheat flour. Gluten triggers immune system in patients to damage small intestine villi. As a result, patients cannot absorb nutrients from food and remain malnourished, which could lead to anemia, weight loss and fatigue. Celiac disease patients suffer from fat malabsorption.

A gluten-free diet is also recommended for patients with wheat allergy, dermatitis herpetiformis; multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders, autism spectrum disorders, ADHD, and some behavioral problems. Gluten-containing cereals are wheat, barley, rye, oats and triticale. Gluten is also present as a food additive in the form of a flavoring, stabilizing or thickening agent.

In these conditions one should switch over to gluten-free foods. The best alternative is to shift from wheat flour to gram flour (besan).