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Benefits of Soybean And Its Side Effects Tips

Dealing With Common Problems Faced In Winter!

BHMS
Homeopath, Delhi

COMMON PROBLEM IN WINTERS (COUGH

BRONCHITIS [BRONCHITIS]


Inflammation of the large air passages which carry air from the windpipe to lungs is known as bronchitis.

CAUSES:

Smoking is the main cause.
Allergy like – such as air pollutant.
Infection – viral or bacterial.
• Occupation – coal miners, grain handlers, metal molders and people working with dust.
• Pre-existing disease as pneumonia, emphysema etc.

SIGN AND SYMPTOMS:

• Cold with nasal discharge.
• Cough with yellow-greenish sputum.
• Breathlessness.
• Chest pains.
Fever with headaches and loss of appetite.
• These entire symptoms can increase in severe condition.

DIETARY MANAGEMENT:

• Avoid dairy products like milk, butter, cheese because these will increase mucus secretion in the respiratory system.
• Avoid hot spicy and highly seasoned food.
• Avoid cold food, cold drinks, ice, ice-creams and aerated drinks.
• Drink lukewarm water.
• Boil a mixture of Bishops weed (Ajwain), tea leaves and water and inhale the steam, this acts as decongestant. Do this at least 2-3 times a day.
• Gargle with warm water, a pinch of salt and turmeric to soothe your throat.
• Have only fruits for 4-5 days later can have raw salads, vegetables and sweet fruits for next 5-6 days.
• Have hot vegetable soups.
• Have bland and boiled food.
• Include turmeric, garlic, ginger and onions in your diet but avoid if you are on homeopathic medication.
• Consume lots of vitamin C: foods of animal origin are poor in vitamin C.
– Fresh citrus fruits, green vegetables.
• Increase consumption of vitamin B:
– Milk and milk products, eggs, shrimps, crabs and lobsters.
– Lean meat especially pork, fish, dairy products, poultry, egg yolk, Liver, kidney, pancreas, yeast (Brewer's yeast).
– Carrots, bananas, avocado, raspberries, artichoke, cauliflower, soy flour, barley, cereals pasta, whole grains, barn-like unpolished rice and wheat germ, dried beans, peas and soybeans.
– Green leafy vegetables, legumes, nuts, whole grain.
• Consume lots of vitamin A; it maintains the integrity of the respiratory mucosa: Liver oils of fish like cod, shark, and halibut are richest source of vitamin A.
– Animal sources: egg, milk and milk products, meat, fish, kidney and liver.
– Yellow orange-colored fruits and vegetables, dark green leafy vegetables.
• Have ginger powder or fresh ginger juice in honey before retiring to bed.
• Every morning, drink boiled mixture of – ½ cup water, little ginger, 2-3 leaves of sweet basil (tulsi) and mint leaves, or you can eat the raw leaves, this will boost up your immunity.

NOTE:

• Avoid smoking.
• Take rest at home and keep your self warm.
• Change occupation if possible in case of miners, etc. or take precautions to prevent the particles being inhaled.
• Practice yoga will help by breathing exercise.
• Treat the cause.

 

 

1 person found this helpful

What Is OCD?

Dr. Ramakrishna Chanduri 88% (2518 ratings)
BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad

What is OCD?

  • OCD is a mental health condition that centers around a debilitating obsession or compulsion, distressing actions, and repetitive thoughts.

  • A 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) mental health report estimated that OCD was among the top 20 causes of illness-related disability worldwide for people aged 15 to 44 years.

  • The report also suggested that OCD was the fourth most common mental illness after phobias, substance abuse, and major depression.

  • OCD is associated with a wide range of functional impairments and has a significant impact on social and working life.

Types:

There are several types of OCD that present in different ways.

1. Checking: This is a need to repeatedly check something for harm, leaks, damage, or fire. Checking can include repeatedly monitoring taps, alarms, car doors, house lights, or other appliances.

  • It can also apply to "checking people." Some people with OCD diagnose illnesses they feel that they and the people close to them might have. This checking can occur hundreds of times and often for hours, regardless of any commitments the individual may have.

  • Checking can also involve repeatedly confirming the authenticity of memories. A person with OCD might repeatedly validate letters and e-mails for fear of having made mistakes. There may be a fear of having unintentionally offended the recipient.

  • Contamination or mental contamination: This occurs when a person with OCD feels a constant and overbearing need to wash and obsesses that objects they touch are contaminated. The fear is that the individual or the object may become contaminated or ill unless repeated cleaning takes place.

  • It can lead excessive toothbrushing, overcleaning certain rooms in the house, such as the bathroom or kitchen, and avoiding large crowds for fear of contracting germs.

  • Mental contamination is the feeling of being 'dirty' after being mistreated or put down. In this type of contamination, it is always another person that is responsible. A person with OCD will try to

  • 'scrub away' this feeling by showering and washing excessively.

2. Hoarding: This is the inability to throw away used or useless possessions.

3. Rumination: Ruminating involves an extended and unfocused obsessive train of thought that focuses on wide-ranging, broad, and often philosophical topics, such as what happens after death or the beginning of the universe.

The person may seem detached and deep in thought. However, the ruminating never reaches a satisfactory conclusion.

4. Intrusive thoughts: These are often violent, horrific, obsessional thoughts that often involve hurting a loved one violently or sexually.

They are not produced out of choice and can cause the person with OCD severe distress. Because of this distress, they are unlikely to follow through on these thoughts.

These thoughts can include obsessions about relationships, killing others or suicide, a fear of being a pedophile, or being obsessed with superstitions.

5. Symmetry and orderliness: A person with OCD may also obsess about objects being lined up to avoid discomfort or harm. They may adjust the books on their shelf repeatedly so that they are all straight and perfectly lined up, for example.

While these are not the only types of OCD, obsessions and compulsions will generally fall into these categories.

Symptoms:

  • OCD is separated from other mental health conditions by the presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both. The obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, and interfere with a person's normal function.

  • Indications of OCD can occur in children and teenagers, with the disease usually beginning gradually and worsening with age. Symptoms of OCD can be mild or severe. Some people experience obsessive thoughts only, without engaging in compulsive behavior.

  • Some people who experience OCD successfully hide their symptoms for fear of embarrassment or stigma. Friends and family may, however, notice some of the more physical signs.

Causes:

  • Person washing hands

  • Constant hand-washing and washing and cleaning in a specific way are common OCD compulsions.

  • Despite a wealth of research, the exact causes of OCD have not been identified.

  • OCD is thought to have a neurobiological basis, with neuroimaging studies showing that the brain functions differently in people with the disorder. An abnormality, or an imbalance in neurotransmitters, is thought to be involved in OCD.

The disorder is equally common among adult men and women.

*OCD in children:

OCD that begins in childhood is more common in boys than girls, with the usual time of onset of OCD later for females than males.

The condition might be triggered by a combination of genetic, neurological, behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors.

*Genetic causes:

OCD runs in families and can be considered a "familial disorder." The disease may span generations with close relatives of people with OCD significantly more likely to develop OCD themselves.

Twin studies of adults suggest that obsessive-compulsive symptoms are moderately able to be inherited, with genetic factors contributing 27 to 47 percent variance in scores that measure obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, no single gene has been identified as the "cause" of OCD.

*Autoimmune causes:

Some rapid-onset cases of OCD in children might be consequences of Group A streptococcal infections, which cause inflammation and dysfunction in the basal ganglia.

These cases are grouped and referred to as pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

In recent years, however, other pathogens, such as the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease and the H1N1 flu virus, have also been associated with the rapid onset of OCD in children. As such, clinicians have altered the acronym to PANS, which stands for Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome.

Behavioral causes:

The behavioral theory suggests that people with OCD associate certain objects or situations with fear. They learn to avoid those things or learn to perform "rituals" to help reduce the fear. This fear and avoidance or ritual cycle may begin during a period of intense stress, such as when starting a new job or just after an important relationship comes to an end.

Once the connection between an object and the feeling of fear becomes established, people with OCD begin to avoid that object and the fear it generates, rather than confronting or tolerating the fear.

*Cognitive causes:

  • The behavioral theory outlined above focuses on how people with OCD make an association between an object and fear. The cognitive theory, however, focuses on how people with OCD misinterpret their thoughts.

  • Most people have unwelcome or intrusive thoughts at certain times, but for individuals with OCD, the importance of those thoughts are exaggerated.

  • For example, a person who is caring for an infant and who is under intense pressure may have an intrusive thought of harming the infant either deliberately or accidentally.

  • Most people can shrug off and disregard the thought, but a person with OCD may exaggerate the importance of the thought and respond as though it signifies a threat. As long as the individual with OCD interprets these intrusive thoughts as cataclysmic and true, they will continue the avoidance and ritual behaviors.

*Neurological causes:

  • Brain scan

  • Brain scans have shown abnormal activity in people with OCD.

  • Brain imaging techniques have allowed researchers to study the activity of specific areas of the brain, leading to the discovery that some parts of the brain are different in people with OCD when compared to those without.

  • Despite this finding, it is not known exactly how these differences relate to the development of OCD.

  • Imbalances in the brain chemicals serotonin and glutamate may play a part in OCD.

*Environmental causes:

  • Environmental stressors may be a trigger for OCD in people with a tendency toward developing the condition.

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents and children has also been associated with an increased risk of onset of obsessive-compulsions. One study found that 30 percent of children aged 6 to 18 years who experienced a TBI developed symptoms of OCD within 12 months of the injury.

  • Overall, studies indicate that people with OCD frequently report stressful and traumatic life events before the illness begins.

Diagnosis:

According to the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the diagnostic criteria for OCD include:

  • the presence of obsessions, compulsions or both

  • the obsessions and compulsions are time-consuming or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning

  • the obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not due to the physiological effects of a substance, for example, drug abuse or medication for another condition.

  • the disturbance is not better explained by another mental disorder

  • If the above criteria are met, a diagnosis of OCD might be given.

A number of other psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression and anxiety, have similar features to OCD and can occur alongside the condition.

Role of Homeopathy in ODC :

Homeopathy is very proficient in managing the symptoms of OCD because homeopathic treatment for OCD takes into consideration the entire life situation, physical and emotional make-up of the person.
Each remedy in homeopathic treatment for OCD is chosen carefully and used judiciously, ensuring elimination of any side effects and maximization of the benefits.
Moreover, relapse and recurrence of the condition also be prevented with Homeopathy.
Homeopathic treatment for OCD is a patient-oriented science and medicines are prescribed on the characteristics of the individual rather than just the symptoms of the disease.

Diet And Nutrition:

  1. Have a Calcium-rich diet: Cheese, milk, curd, soybeans, sardines, cottage cheese, dark green veggies ( spinach, Chinese cabbage, watercress etc.), etc. are loaded with calcium. Include more of them in your diet.

  2. Ensure Vitamins: Sunflower seeds and oil, pistachio, meat, fish, chicken, banana, avocadoes, spinach, asparagus, tomatoes, etc. that are rich in different vitamins should be consumed.

  3. Take food rich in Folic Acid: Broccoli, bananas, potatoes and soy products are good sources of folic acid. Folic acid is a nerve-strengthening vitamin

What Is OCD?

Diploma In Gastroenterology, Diploma In Dermatology, BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad

What is OCD?

  • OCD is a mental health condition that centers around a debilitating obsession or compulsion, distressing actions, and repetitive thoughts.

  • A 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) mental health report estimated that OCD was among the top 20 causes of illness-related disability worldwide for people aged 15 to 44 years.

  • The report also suggested that OCD was the fourth most common mental illness after phobias, substance abuse, and major depression.

  • OCD is associated with a wide range of functional impairments and has a significant impact on social and working life.

Types:

There are several types of OCD that present in different ways.

1. Checking: This is a need to repeatedly check something for harm, leaks, damage, or fire. Checking can include repeatedly monitoring taps, alarms, car doors, house lights, or other appliances.

  • It can also apply to "checking people." Some people with OCD diagnose illnesses they feel that they and the people close to them might have. This checking can occur hundreds of times and often for hours, regardless of any commitments the individual may have.

  • Checking can also involve repeatedly confirming the authenticity of memories. A person with OCD might repeatedly validate letters and e-mails for fear of having made mistakes. There may be a fear of having unintentionally offended the recipient.

  • Contamination or mental contamination: This occurs when a person with OCD feels a constant and overbearing need to wash and obsesses that objects they touch are contaminated. The fear is that the individual or the object may become contaminated or ill unless repeated cleaning takes place.

  • It can lead excessive toothbrushing, overcleaning certain rooms in the house, such as the bathroom or kitchen, and avoiding large crowds for fear of contracting germs.

  • Mental contamination is the feeling of being 'dirty' after being mistreated or put down. In this type of contamination, it is always another person that is responsible. A person with OCD will try to

  • 'scrub away' this feeling by showering and washing excessively.

2. Hoarding: This is the inability to throw away used or useless possessions.

3. Rumination: Ruminating involves an extended and unfocused obsessive train of thought that focuses on wide-ranging, broad, and often philosophical topics, such as what happens after death or the beginning of the universe.

The person may seem detached and deep in thought. However, the ruminating never reaches a satisfactory conclusion.

4. Intrusive thoughts: These are often violent, horrific, obsessional thoughts that often involve hurting a loved one violently or sexually.

They are not produced out of choice and can cause the person with OCD severe distress. Because of this distress, they are unlikely to follow through on these thoughts.

These thoughts can include obsessions about relationships, killing others or suicide, a fear of being a pedophile, or being obsessed with superstitions.

5. Symmetry and orderliness: A person with OCD may also obsess about objects being lined up to avoid discomfort or harm. They may adjust the books on their shelf repeatedly so that they are all straight and perfectly lined up, for example.

While these are not the only types of OCD, obsessions and compulsions will generally fall into these categories.

Symptoms:

  • OCD is separated from other mental health conditions by the presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both. The obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, and interfere with a person's normal function.

  • Indications of OCD can occur in children and teenagers, with the disease usually beginning gradually and worsening with age. Symptoms of OCD can be mild or severe. Some people experience obsessive thoughts only, without engaging in compulsive behavior.

  • Some people who experience OCD successfully hide their symptoms for fear of embarrassment or stigma. Friends and family may, however, notice some of the more physical signs.

Causes:

  • Person washing hands

  • Constant hand-washing and washing and cleaning in a specific way are common OCD compulsions.

  • Despite a wealth of research, the exact causes of OCD have not been identified.

  • OCD is thought to have a neurobiological basis, with neuroimaging studies showing that the brain functions differently in people with the disorder. An abnormality, or an imbalance in neurotransmitters, is thought to be involved in OCD.

The disorder is equally common among adult men and women.

*OCD in children:

OCD that begins in childhood is more common in boys than girls, with the usual time of onset of OCD later for females than males.

The condition might be triggered by a combination of genetic, neurological, behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors.

*Genetic causes:

OCD runs in families and can be considered a "familial disorder." The disease may span generations with close relatives of people with OCD significantly more likely to develop OCD themselves.

Twin studies of adults suggest that obsessive-compulsive symptoms are moderately able to be inherited, with genetic factors contributing 27 to 47 percent variance in scores that measure obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, no single gene has been identified as the "cause" of OCD.

*Autoimmune causes:

Some rapid-onset cases of OCD in children might be consequences of Group A streptococcal infections, which cause inflammation and dysfunction in the basal ganglia.

These cases are grouped and referred to as pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

In recent years, however, other pathogens, such as the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease and the H1N1 flu virus, have also been associated with the rapid onset of OCD in children. As such, clinicians have altered the acronym to PANS, which stands for Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome.

Behavioral causes:

The behavioral theory suggests that people with OCD associate certain objects or situations with fear. They learn to avoid those things or learn to perform "rituals" to help reduce the fear. This fear and avoidance or ritual cycle may begin during a period of intense stress, such as when starting a new job or just after an important relationship comes to an end.

Once the connection between an object and the feeling of fear becomes established, people with OCD begin to avoid that object and the fear it generates, rather than confronting or tolerating the fear.

*Cognitive causes:

  • The behavioral theory outlined above focuses on how people with OCD make an association between an object and fear. The cognitive theory, however, focuses on how people with OCD misinterpret their thoughts.

  • Most people have unwelcome or intrusive thoughts at certain times, but for individuals with OCD, the importance of those thoughts are exaggerated.

  • For example, a person who is caring for an infant and who is under intense pressure may have an intrusive thought of harming the infant either deliberately or accidentally.

  • Most people can shrug off and disregard the thought, but a person with OCD may exaggerate the importance of the thought and respond as though it signifies a threat. As long as the individual with OCD interprets these intrusive thoughts as cataclysmic and true, they will continue the avoidance and ritual behaviors.

*Neurological causes:

  • Brain scan

  • Brain scans have shown abnormal activity in people with OCD.

  • Brain imaging techniques have allowed researchers to study the activity of specific areas of the brain, leading to the discovery that some parts of the brain are different in people with OCD when compared to those without.

  • Despite this finding, it is not known exactly how these differences relate to the development of OCD.

  • Imbalances in the brain chemicals serotonin and glutamate may play a part in OCD.

*Environmental causes:

  • Environmental stressors may be a trigger for OCD in people with a tendency toward developing the condition.

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents and children has also been associated with an increased risk of onset of obsessive-compulsions. One study found that 30 percent of children aged 6 to 18 years who experienced a TBI developed symptoms of OCD within 12 months of the injury.

  • Overall, studies indicate that people with OCD frequently report stressful and traumatic life events before the illness begins.

Diagnosis:

According to the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the diagnostic criteria for OCD include:

  • the presence of obsessions, compulsions or both

  • the obsessions and compulsions are time-consuming or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning

  • the obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not due to the physiological effects of a substance, for example, drug abuse or medication for another condition.

  • the disturbance is not better explained by another mental disorder

  • If the above criteria are met, a diagnosis of OCD might be given.

A number of other psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression and anxiety, have similar features to OCD and can occur alongside the condition.

Role of Homeopathy in ODC :

Homeopathy is very proficient in managing the symptoms of OCD because homeopathic treatment for OCD takes into consideration the entire life situation, physical and emotional make-up of the person.
Each remedy in homeopathic treatment for OCD is chosen carefully and used judiciously, ensuring elimination of any side effects and maximization of the benefits.
Moreover, relapse and recurrence of the condition also be prevented with Homeopathy.
Homeopathic treatment for OCD is a patient-oriented science and medicines are prescribed on the characteristics of the individual rather than just the symptoms of the disease.

Diet And Nutrition:

  1. Have a Calcium-rich diet: Cheese, milk, curd, soybeans, sardines, cottage cheese, dark green veggies ( spinach, Chinese cabbage, watercress etc.), etc. are loaded with calcium. Include more of them in your diet.

  2. Ensure Vitamins: Sunflower seeds and oil, pistachio, meat, fish, chicken, banana, avocadoes, spinach, asparagus, tomatoes, etc. that are rich in different vitamins should be consumed.

  3. Take food rich in Folic Acid: Broccoli, bananas, potatoes and soy products are good sources of folic acid. Folic acid is a nerve-strengthening vitamin

1 person found this helpful

What Is OCD?

BHMS, Diploma in Dermatology
Sexologist, Hyderabad

What is OCD?

  • OCD is a mental health condition that centers around a debilitating obsession or compulsion, distressing actions, and repetitive thoughts.

  • A 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) mental health report estimated that OCD was among the top 20 causes of illness-related disability worldwide for people aged 15 to 44 years.

  • The report also suggested that OCD was the fourth most common mental illness after phobias, substance abuse, and major depression.

  • OCD is associated with a wide range of functional impairments and has a significant impact on social and working life.

Types:

There are several types of OCD that present in different ways.

1. Checking: This is a need to repeatedly check something for harm, leaks, damage, or fire. Checking can include repeatedly monitoring taps, alarms, car doors, house lights, or other appliances.

  • It can also apply to "checking people." Some people with OCD diagnose illnesses they feel that they and the people close to them might have. This checking can occur hundreds of times and often for hours, regardless of any commitments the individual may have.

  • Checking can also involve repeatedly confirming the authenticity of memories. A person with OCD might repeatedly validate letters and e-mails for fear of having made mistakes. There may be a fear of having unintentionally offended the recipient.

  • Contamination or mental contamination: This occurs when a person with OCD feels a constant and overbearing need to wash and obsesses that objects they touch are contaminated. The fear is that the individual or the object may become contaminated or ill unless repeated cleaning takes place.

  • It can lead excessive toothbrushing, overcleaning certain rooms in the house, such as the bathroom or kitchen, and avoiding large crowds for fear of contracting germs.

  • Mental contamination is the feeling of being 'dirty' after being mistreated or put down. In this type of contamination, it is always another person that is responsible. A person with OCD will try to

  • 'scrub away' this feeling by showering and washing excessively.

2. Hoarding: This is the inability to throw away used or useless possessions.

3. Rumination: Ruminating involves an extended and unfocused obsessive train of thought that focuses on wide-ranging, broad, and often philosophical topics, such as what happens after death or the beginning of the universe.

The person may seem detached and deep in thought. However, the ruminating never reaches a satisfactory conclusion.

4. Intrusive thoughts: These are often violent, horrific, obsessional thoughts that often involve hurting a loved one violently or sexually.

They are not produced out of choice and can cause the person with OCD severe distress. Because of this distress, they are unlikely to follow through on these thoughts.

These thoughts can include obsessions about relationships, killing others or suicide, a fear of being a pedophile, or being obsessed with superstitions.

5. Symmetry and orderliness: A person with OCD may also obsess about objects being lined up to avoid discomfort or harm. They may adjust the books on their shelf repeatedly so that they are all straight and perfectly lined up, for example.

While these are not the only types of OCD, obsessions and compulsions will generally fall into these categories.

Symptoms:

  • OCD is separated from other mental health conditions by the presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both. The obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time-consuming, and interfere with a person's normal function.

  • Indications of OCD can occur in children and teenagers, with the disease usually beginning gradually and worsening with age. Symptoms of OCD can be mild or severe. Some people experience obsessive thoughts only, without engaging in compulsive behavior.

  • Some people who experience OCD successfully hide their symptoms for fear of embarrassment or stigma. Friends and family may, however, notice some of the more physical signs.

Causes:

  • Person washing hands

  • Constant hand-washing and washing and cleaning in a specific way are common OCD compulsions.

  • Despite a wealth of research, the exact causes of OCD have not been identified.

  • OCD is thought to have a neurobiological basis, with neuroimaging studies showing that the brain functions differently in people with the disorder. An abnormality, or an imbalance in neurotransmitters, is thought to be involved in OCD.

The disorder is equally common among adult men and women.

*OCD in children:

OCD that begins in childhood is more common in boys than girls, with the usual time of onset of OCD later for females than males.

The condition might be triggered by a combination of genetic, neurological, behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors.

*Genetic causes:

OCD runs in families and can be considered a "familial disorder." The disease may span generations with close relatives of people with OCD significantly more likely to develop OCD themselves.

Twin studies of adults suggest that obsessive-compulsive symptoms are moderately able to be inherited, with genetic factors contributing 27 to 47 percent variance in scores that measure obsessive-compulsive symptoms. However, no single gene has been identified as the "cause" of OCD.

*Autoimmune causes:

Some rapid-onset cases of OCD in children might be consequences of Group A streptococcal infections, which cause inflammation and dysfunction in the basal ganglia.

These cases are grouped and referred to as pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

In recent years, however, other pathogens, such as the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease and the H1N1 flu virus, have also been associated with the rapid onset of OCD in children. As such, clinicians have altered the acronym to PANS, which stands for Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome.

Behavioral causes:

The behavioral theory suggests that people with OCD associate certain objects or situations with fear. They learn to avoid those things or learn to perform "rituals" to help reduce the fear. This fear and avoidance or ritual cycle may begin during a period of intense stress, such as when starting a new job or just after an important relationship comes to an end.

Once the connection between an object and the feeling of fear becomes established, people with OCD begin to avoid that object and the fear it generates, rather than confronting or tolerating the fear.

*Cognitive causes:

  • The behavioral theory outlined above focuses on how people with OCD make an association between an object and fear. The cognitive theory, however, focuses on how people with OCD misinterpret their thoughts.

  • Most people have unwelcome or intrusive thoughts at certain times, but for individuals with OCD, the importance of those thoughts are exaggerated.

  • For example, a person who is caring for an infant and who is under intense pressure may have an intrusive thought of harming the infant either deliberately or accidentally.

  • Most people can shrug off and disregard the thought, but a person with OCD may exaggerate the importance of the thought and respond as though it signifies a threat. As long as the individual with OCD interprets these intrusive thoughts as cataclysmic and true, they will continue the avoidance and ritual behaviors.

*Neurological causes:

  • Brain scan

  • Brain scans have shown abnormal activity in people with OCD.

  • Brain imaging techniques have allowed researchers to study the activity of specific areas of the brain, leading to the discovery that some parts of the brain are different in people with OCD when compared to those without.

  • Despite this finding, it is not known exactly how these differences relate to the development of OCD.

  • Imbalances in the brain chemicals serotonin and glutamate may play a part in OCD.

*Environmental causes:

  • Environmental stressors may be a trigger for OCD in people with a tendency toward developing the condition.

  • Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents and children has also been associated with an increased risk of onset of obsessive-compulsions. One study found that 30 percent of children aged 6 to 18 years who experienced a TBI developed symptoms of OCD within 12 months of the injury.

  • Overall, studies indicate that people with OCD frequently report stressful and traumatic life events before the illness begins.

Diagnosis:

According to the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the diagnostic criteria for OCD include:

  • the presence of obsessions, compulsions or both

  • the obsessions and compulsions are time-consuming or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning

  • the obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not due to the physiological effects of a substance, for example, drug abuse or medication for another condition.

  • the disturbance is not better explained by another mental disorder

  • If the above criteria are met, a diagnosis of OCD might be given.

A number of other psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression and anxiety, have similar features to OCD and can occur alongside the condition.

Role of Homeopathy in ODC :

Homeopathy is very proficient in managing the symptoms of OCD because homeopathic treatment for OCD takes into consideration the entire life situation, physical and emotional make-up of the person.
Each remedy in homeopathic treatment for OCD is chosen carefully and used judiciously, ensuring elimination of any side effects and maximization of the benefits.
Moreover, relapse and recurrence of the condition also be prevented with Homeopathy.
Homeopathic treatment for OCD is a patient-oriented science and medicines are prescribed on the characteristics of the individual rather than just the symptoms of the disease.

Diet And Nutrition:

  1. Have a Calcium-rich diet: Cheese, milk, curd, soybeans, sardines, cottage cheese, dark green veggies ( spinach, Chinese cabbage, watercress etc.), etc. are loaded with calcium. Include more of them in your diet.

  2. Ensure Vitamins: Sunflower seeds and oil, pistachio, meat, fish, chicken, banana, avocadoes, spinach, asparagus, tomatoes, etc. that are rich in different vitamins should be consumed.

  3. Take food rich in Folic Acid: Broccoli, bananas, potatoes and soy products are good sources of folic acid. Folic acid is a nerve-strengthening vitamin

What Are The Harmful Effects Of The Excess Intake Of Protein

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Gurgaon
What Are The Harmful Effects Of The Excess Intake Of Protein

Protein is a major component in daily diet. So it should be taken in appropriate quantity.
Every cell in your body contains protein, so meeting your protein requirement is essential for your health.

-building tissues and muscles. Protein is necessary for building and repairing body tissues. 
-hormone production
-enzymes
-immune function
-energy.

Ideally, a person should consume 1gm of protein per kg of ideal body weight. That means everyone has an ideal body weight according to his/ her height. For example, a man is of 5'4" height so according to this height his ideal weight should be 59kg. So that person should eat 59 gm of protein.
But the requirement of protein increases in some cases like athletes, sportsman or body builders. 
Because their body uses protein primarily to repair and rebuild muscle that is broken down during exercise 
So they should eat 1.2 to 2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight which again will depend on the type of sports.

Now let's talk about the sources of protein for both vegetarians and non vegetarians.
So the veg sources of protein are -tofu, soybeans, lentils, chickpeas and most varieties of beans, green peas, milk and milk products.

And the non-veg sources of protein are- chicken, turkey, beef, pork, fish plus all the vegetarian sources mentioned above.

Now, what happens to our body if we take protein in excess amount? well, it causes a number of problems in our body. Some of them are discussed below:

Weight gain

High-protein diets may promote weight loss, but it may only be short term. Excess protein is usually stored as fat while the surplus of amino acids is excreted. This can lead to weight gain over time, especially if you consume too many calories while trying to increase your protein intake.

Kidney damage

Following a high-protein diet for an extended period can increase your risk of kidney damage. Eating too much protein can also affect people who already have kidney disease. This is because of the excess nitrogen found in the amino acids that make up proteins.

Your kidneys have to work harder to get rid of the extra nitrogen and waste products of protein metabolism.

Heart disease

Eating lots of red meat and full-fat dairy foods as part of a high-protein diet may lead to heart disease. This could be related to higher intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol.

Increased cancer risk

High-protein diets have been linked to an increase in cancer, possibly due to higher levels of meat-based protein consumption. Eating more meat is associated with colon, breast, and prostate cancer.

Constipation

Many people who take high protein diet reported constipation. This is because high-protein diets that restrict carbohydrates are typically low in fiber.

Bad breath

Eating large amounts of protein can lead to bad breath, especially if you restrict your carbohydrate. This could be in part because your body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, which produces chemicals that give off an unpleasant fruity smell.

When to see your doctor?

It's important that you take the risks into consideration before starting a high-protein diet. High-protein diets may be suitable for certain people. Always speak to your doctor before beginning any new diet, especially if you have any health conditions.

Your doctor and dietitian can guide you to weigh the pros and cons of a high-protein diet based on your individual needs.

Overall, it's important that you eat a healthy, balanced diet and engage in an active lifestyle.

6 people found this helpful

Ayurveda And Hair Loss !

B.A.M.S, MD (Ayu) Kayachikitsa
Ayurveda, Shimla
Ayurveda And Hair Loss !

Hair fall has a direct impact on the way you feel about yourself, your self esteem and confidence. It is also true that it is a very common problem and can be controlled and stopped completely through proper treatment. Ayurvedic treatment for hair fall has long term effects and it brings out the best results since the issues get rectified from the inside, preventing them from coming back.
 
Ayurveda and Hair Loss
 
According to Ayurveda, hair fall is associated with body type that varies from person to person and also the stability of mind-body structure. Hair is considered a byproduct of bone formation, as stated by Ayurveda. The tissues which are responsible for the development of bones are also responsible for hair growth. Diet, yoga, meditation and medicated herbal oil massage are the Ayurvedic treatments generally recommended for hair loss.
 
Here are some ways through which Ayurveda addresses the problem of hair fall:
 
1.    Dietary modifications 

It is important to identify the lifestyle habits that cause hair fall problems. Consumption of alcohol, meat, coffee, tea and smoking are some of these habits. Hair fall can also be aggravated due to intake of too much greasy, spicy, oily, sour, fried and acidic foods.
 
Here are some ways suggested by Ayurveda to beat hair fall:
 
1.    Hair growth can be stimulated by drinking fresh juices of Pomegranate, carrot, spinach and Kokam.

2.     Sesame seeds promote hair growth as they are rich in magnesium and calcium.

3.     Cow's Ghee is a trusted remedy to resolve all scalp-related problems.

4.     Green vegetables and fruits are rich in fiber and hence help in preventing hair fall.

5.     To make the roots of hair strong, foods rich in vitamin C, vitamin B-complex, sulphur and zinc must be consumed, which are found in whole grains, soybeans, buttermilk, nuts and milk.

6.     Yoga and meditation: Inverted asanas help in stimulating the blood flow to the head. Additionally, practicing deep breathing exercises to control anxiety, stress and keep the mind balanced is also advisable.

7.     Ayurvedic herbs and medicated oil: Bhringaraaja, Brahmi, Amla, Neem, Ritha and Ashwagandha are some ayurvedic herbs rich in essential nutrients that help in reducing stress and promoting hair growth. Different types of oils including coconut oil, brahmi oil, amla oil or mustard oil are useful to control hair fall.

Natural Ways To Cure Hair Loss!

Dr. Mamta Kumari 89% (78 ratings)
Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MD- Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Greater Noida
Natural Ways To Cure Hair Loss!

Hair fall has a direct impact on the way you feel about yourself, your self esteem and confidence. It is also true that it is a very common problem and can be controlled and stopped completely through proper treatment. Ayurvedic treatment for hair fall has long term effects and it brings out the best results since the issues get rectified from the inside, preventing them from coming back.
 
Ayurveda and Hair Loss
 
According to Ayurveda, hair fall is associated with body type that varies from person to person and also the stability of mind-body structure. Hair is considered a byproduct of bone formation, as stated by Ayurveda. The tissues which are responsible for the development of bones are also responsible for hair growth. Diet, yoga, meditation and medicated herbal oil massage are the Ayurvedic treatments generally recommended for hair loss.
 
Here are some ways through which Ayurveda addresses the problem of hair fall:
 
1. Dietary modifications-

It is important to identify the lifestyle habits that cause hair fall problems. Consumption of alcohol, meat, coffee, tea and smoking are some of these habits. Hair fall can also be aggravated due to intake of too much greasy, spicy, oily, sour, fried and acidic foods.
 
Here are some ways suggested by Ayurveda to beat hair fall:
 
1. Hair growth can be stimulated by drinking fresh juices of Pomegranate, carrot, spinach and Kokam.

2. Sesame seeds promote hair growth as they are rich in magnesium and calcium.

3. Cow's Ghee is a trusted remedy to resolve all scalp-related problems.

4. Green vegetables and fruits are rich in fiber and hence help in preventing hair fall.

5. To make the roots of hair strong, foods rich in vitamin C, vitamin B-complex, sulphur and zinc must be consumed, which are found in whole grains, soybeans, buttermilk, nuts and milk.

6. Yoga and meditation: Inverted asanas help in stimulating the blood flow to the head. Additionally, practicing deep breathing exercises to control anxiety, stress and keep the mind balanced is also advisable.

7. Ayurvedic herbs and medicated oil: Bhringaraaja, Brahmi, Amla, Neem, Ritha and Ashwagandha are some ayurvedic herbs rich in essential nutrients that help in reducing stress and promoting hair growth. Different types of oils including coconut oil, brahmi oil, amla oil or mustard oil are useful to control hair fall.

Iron - Why Is It An Important Factor For Good Health?

Dr. Anil Savani 89% (148 ratings)
MD - Medicine, Diploma in Diabetes Management
Diabetologist, Surat
Iron - Why Is It An Important Factor For Good Health?

Iron is definitely one of the most important ingredients and nutrients that we require. Most of the health problems in the world are caused due to iron deficiency, including low immunity and anaemia, among many others. The lack of iron can lead to a variety of developmental delays and can also affect the haemoglobin levels in the blood which gives rise to symptoms like dizzy spells and fatigue.

So what are the underrated facts about iron that we need to know? Read on -

  1. Transport of Oxygen: Iron is credited with the transport of oxygen within the human body. It is a well-known fact that all the cells, atoms and tissues in our body need oxygen, in order to grow and maintain a livelihood. The red blood cells in our body are a good source of this oxygen as they contain an iron-rich protein called haemoglobin. This element is what makes the oxygen which is later released in a more targeted manner. While two grams of oxygen can exist in the cells at any given point, this supply can diminish if the dietary iron intake reduces which can lead to a condition called anaemia.
  2. Production of Energy: Iron is also an element that helps in the metabolism, which has great implications for the various organs and muscles of the human body. The cells of our body are known to burn these calories in the diet so as to create energy which activates these organs. If the iron resources become low in these cells, then the process does not take place in a proper manner, which can lead to symptoms like fatigue before the organ functionality gets compromised.
  3. Iron Rich Food: The kind of foods and materials contain iron include legumes, lentils, fish, tofu, seafood, pork, soybeans, liver, green vegetables like spinach and ladies fingers, raisins, strawberries, and other fortified food like cereals. It is a well-known fact that plant foods tend to contain lower levels of iron as compared to animal foods like red meat. Also, there are many spices that are rich in iron including cumin and cardamom, which can be used on a daily basis to pepper your salads and stir fry preparations.
  4. Cooking and Storage: Iron usually gets sucked out of food when the food is cooked for long or processed and packaged under highly intense condition or with excessive salt additives. Also, when you cook plant sources too much, then the iron can escape by way of the water that it leaves, which evaporates.

Find out a good way to bring iron into your diet, but remember that too much of iron can also lead to toxicity.

4381 people found this helpful

Menopause And Homeopathy

MD Homeopath, DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Gurgaon
Menopause And Homeopathy

The disruption of the normal female cycles of menstruation and ovulation after the age of 45 and the loss of her ability to conceive naturally is known as menopause. The associated symptoms of menopause are heat flushes, insomnia, weight gain, depression, nausea and fatigue. While hormone replacement therapy is the most common procedure to provide relief from menopausal symptoms, natural homeopathic remedies can also be used for the same. These remedies are completely safe as opposed to hormone replacement therapy which has a number of side effects.

The following homeopathic medicines and remedies can be used to treat menopause :

1. A balanced diet which provides you with optimal nutrition can be helpful in treating menopausal symptoms. When you get enough vitamins and minerals, the physical discomfort caused by the symptoms can be reduced greatly.
2. Phosphorus can help with migraines, extreme sweating, numb hands, fast pulse, memory problems and dry and itchy skin. Foods high in phosphorus content are meat, fish, cheese, nuts and seeds of pumpkins, sunflowers etc.
3. Excessive deposition of fat can interfere with the hormonal cycles and cause imbalances in the level of estrogen and progesterone. So, regular yoga and exercise can be helpful.
4. Amylenum nitrosum can provide relief from profuse sweating, shortness of breath and palpitations.
5. Phytoestrogen or dietary estrogen is a compound found in foods such as soybeans, oats, barley, carrots, fenugreek, rice etc. Phytoestrogen can provide natural relief from menopausal symptoms.
6. Aurum metallicum is used to get the tissues and organs to function normally again and control feelings of anxiety and claustrophobia.
7. Aconitum napellus (wolf's bane) is a flowering plant and its extracts can reduce panic attacks, heat flushes, over excitability and depressive symptoms.
8. Argentum nitricum is a nitrate compound of silver which is used to control excessive bleeding in the pre-menstrual stages.
9. Belladonna (deadly nightshade) is beneficial for a large number of symptoms such as headaches, fatigue, insomnia, frequent urination, osteoporosis, abnormal weight gain and other nervous disorders.
10. Bryonia alba, a flowering plant, is used as a remedy for vaginal infections, rashes and vaginal dryness that are common during menopause.
11. Natrum muriaticum, in small amounts, helps to reduce stress. Stress can cause problems in thyroid function, cognitive functioning, digestive system functioning and it can elevate blood pressure levels rapidly.
12. Nux vomica (strychnine) is a common homeopathic medicine for nausea, vomiting and indigestion. These problems are seen frequently in menopausal women, especially after meals at night.


 

 

3942 people found this helpful

How To Eat A Healthy Heart Diet?

Sexologist Clinic
Sexologist, Faridabad
How To Eat A Healthy Heart Diet?

Heart Disease is a condition in which a waxy substance called plaque builds up in the artery walls causing a narrowing of those walls. Once this occurs, there is reduced blood flow to the heart, which eventually can cause blockages and possibly a heart attack. There are many risk factors involved in the development of heart disease, some of which you cannot control. The diet, however, is a risk factor that you can control. Controlling your diet also helps you to control cholesterol levels, weight, and blood pressure, which are also risk factors. Key factors in following a heart healthy diet include: Choosing low-fat or lean proteins, low-fat or fat-free dairy products, plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains and high fiber foods, weight control, limiting sodium and being cautious when going out to eat.

Limit fat and cholesterol. Some examples of foods high in fat and cholesterol include butter, lard, hydrogenated margarine, cream sauces, coconut, palm and cottonseed oils, cocoa butter and bacon fat. Excess fat in the diet can contribute to weight gain and elevated cholesterol levels. These are both risk factors for heart disease.

  • Keep saturated fat in your diet less than 7 percent of your daily calories since saturated fats contribute to plaque formation in artery walls
  • Restrict trans fats in your diet since they act similar to saturated fats in your body
  • Dietary cholesterol should be less than 300 milligrams daily
  • If you have elevated LDL or “bad” cholesterol, decrease cholesterol to less than 200 milligrams daily
  • Limit total fat intake to less than 30% of your calories per day
  • Use unsaturated oils to cook with (e.g., olive, peanut, soy, sunflower, canola)
  • Choose oil based salad dressings instead of creamy ones
  • Grill, boil, broil, bake or steam foods instead of frying to decrease total fat intake

 

Choose low-fat proteins.

  • Most saturated fats come from animal sources so it’s important to eat lean cuts of meat, skinless poultry, fish, low fat dairy and egg whites
  • Non-meat low-fat proteins include: dried beans, legumes, soy based products and tofu

 

Choose low-fat or fat-free dairy products.

  • Skim or 1% cow’s milk is recommended
  • Soy or almond milk are both low-fat and nutrient dense
  • Eat low-fat or fat-free cheeses
  • Nonfat or low-fat yogurt is a healthy option
  • Soy-based cheeses


Eat more omega-3 fats. They have been shown to be beneficial for heart health by raising HDL (good) cholesterol.

  • Animal sources include: salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines
  • Aim for fish twice per week
  • Other sources include: walnuts, canola and soybean oil
  • Fish oil supplements are another source, although they do not contain other nutrients found in the food sources

Eat nuts and seeds 3 days per week. They have been shown to improve blood pressure.

  • 5 to 6 nuts is a serving size for mixed nuts, almonds, cashews and pecan halves
  • Read food labels to determine serving size for other nuts and seeds


Eat more fruits and vegetables daily. They have been shown to improve blood pressure.

  • 5 servings of fruits and vegetables are recommended daily
  • Choose fresh or frozen without added fat or salt; unlike canned produce, frozen fruits and vegetables retain vitamin and mineral content
  • Have 2 tbsp. of dried fruit as a snack instead of candy
  • Cut up fresh pieces of fruits and vegetables to have them ready for regular snacks
  • Try ones you’ve never had before to diversify your diet as well as to ensure that you obtain as many vitamins, minerals and antioxidants as you can
  • Make them the main part of your meal at least once daily

 

4 people found this helpful