Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Dr. Vandana Gokle

Gynaecologist, Thane

Dr. Vandana Gokle Gynaecologist, Thane
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. Vandana Gokle
Dr. Vandana Gokle is one of the best Gynaecologists in Kaushalya Medical Foundation Trust Hospital, Thane. She is currently associated with Nest Hospital in Kaushalya Medical Foundation Trust Hospital, Thane. Book an appointment online with Dr. Vandana Gokle on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Gynaecologists in India. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 43 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Gynaecologists online in Thane. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment

Nest Hospital

e Road, Thane H.O. Landmark: Behind Ice Factory, ThaneThane Get Directions
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments
7 days validity
Consult Now

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Vandana Gokle

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Hi I am 29 female. I am a working women. I get tired very soon these days. What should I do?

MD
General Physician, Delhi
Hi , drink at least 8 glass of water, keep yourself well hydrated. Hot atmosphere can make one tired. You can take energy drinks multivitamins.
1 person found this helpful

Hello, I have low hemoglobin and rbc cell is also low, I am worried that I am getting weak day by day. Even I don't have my periods last month. Is there any natural way to get rid of it. Although I am taking levipil 500 mg twice a day and venlite OD 100 mg once at dinner. How long I have to take this medicine? please help.

DGO, MD, MRCOG, CCST, Accredation in Colposcopy
Gynaecologist, Kolkata
These medicines have nothing to do with your low Hb levels. Therefore continue with them as advised by your Physician. I would advice you to take iron supplements to increase your iron levels. Also take food like fish, chicken and green leafy vegetables, bananas that are rich sources of iron.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Pune
There are several studies that show the medical benefits of pranayama. One study showed improvement in pulmonary function tests in patients with asthma and emphysema after practicing yoga and pranayama for 45 min a day over the course of two months.

Hi doctor , Currently i am working in Mumbai. I have a question. I am 26 years old. My parents is seeking a women for me, the thing is I am worried about my body because my body is like little loose, with bigger chest and not fit like a normal man. Did this affect the marriage life and sex.

Diploma in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
General Physician, Delhi
I can see woman written above but you sound like a normal man , get back to tell us if it was a writing mistake , otherwise get examined by your local doctor.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 23 years old and I have taken an I pill tablet within 72 hours . I got my periods on time. Is there any chances of pregnancy further?

Diploma in Naturopathy, M.D. Alternative Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
See having periods is itself an indication of absence of pregnancy, just don't worry you are not pregnant.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

We have 2 months baby at home. We would like to go for copper t for protection. Is that helpful. Any harm to my wife, any side effect as like weight loss / gain, effect to my kids feeding. And what about the packages of Copper t.Needs to check periodically.

BHMS
Homeopath,
Copper t hv soo mny complications like pain in lower abdomen..infection etc...also she need to observe the thread regularly..if it's misses then u need surgical procedure to remove it.soo my suggestion will be not to wear copper-t...
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Pregnancy Diet Tips

DNB, DGO, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Ghaziabad
Pregnancy Diet Tips

5 dietary precautions to take during pregnancy

1. Avoid food cooked outside home.
2. Focus on foods rich in proteins, minerals and vitamins
3. Eat everything in moderation
4. You do not have to eat for two people. 300 calorie extra and above your diet is required by most from 4th month onwards.
5. Learn about your body, thin women need more calories while obese will have to restrict their diet.

We are being married for 2 years and my wife is not yet conceived we have done all check up and everything is normal we wanna know what would be the reason. Also give us some tips to have a baby soon.

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FMAS, DMAS
Gynaecologist, Noida
Hello, if all reports are normal then you should follow her fertile period and track ovulation with an ovulation kit and then practice intercourse during the ovulation period. This shall increase her chances of pregnancy.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Medical Conditions And Pregnancy!

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Medical Conditions And Pregnancy!

Diabetes and Pregnancy

Diabetes is a condition in which the body does not make enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin that is made. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells of the body to make fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood and the body’s cells starve to death. If not managed properly, diabetes can have serious consequences for you and your growing baby.

Pre-Gestational Diabetes

If you already have diabetes and become pregnant, your condition is known as pre-gestational diabetes. The severity of your symptoms and complications often depends on the progression of your diabetes, especially if you have vascular (blood vessel) complications and poor blood glucose control.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which the glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy. Unlike other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes is not caused by a lack of insulin but by other hormones that block the insulin that is made. This condition is known as insulin resistance. If you have gestational diabetes, you may or may not be dependent on insulin.

In most cases, all diabetic symptoms disappear following delivery. However, if you experience gestational diabetes, you will have an increased risk of developing diabetes later in life. This is especially true if you were overweight before pregnancy.

Causes of Gestational Diabetes

Although the specific cause of gestational diabetes is unknown, there are several theories about the origin of this condition. For example, the placenta supplies the growing fetus with nutrients and water. It also makes a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. Some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol and human placental lactogen) can have a blocking effect on the mother’s insulin, which usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into pregnancy.

As the placenta grows, it produces more of these hormones, increasing the level of insulin resistance in the mother. Normally, the mother’s pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance. However, if the mother’s production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results.

Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes

The following factors increase your risk of developing gestational diabetes:

  • Age (over 25 years old)

  • A family history of diabetes

  • Previous delivery of a very large infant, a stillborn or a child with certain birth defects

  • Obesity

Although increased glucose in the urine is often included in the list of risk factors, it is not believed to be a reliable indicator for gestational diabetes.

Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

A glucose screening test is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. To complete this test, you will be asked to drink a special glucose beverage. Then, your doctor will measure your blood sugar level one hour later.

If the test shows an increased blood sugar level, a three-hour glucose tolerance test may be done. If the results of the second test are in the abnormal range, you will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes.

Treatment Options for Gestational Diabetes

Your health care provider or midwife will determine your specific treatment plan for gestational diabetes based on:

  • Age, overall health and medical history

  • Condition and the severity of the disease

  • Long-term expectations for the course of the disease

  • Personal preference

  • Tolerance for specific medicines, procedures or therapies

Treatment for gestational diabetes focuses on keeping blood glucose levels in the normal range. Your specific treatment plan may include:

  • A special diet

  • Daily blood glucose monitoring

  • Exercise

  • Insulin injections or oral medications

Possible Fetal Complications from Gestational Diabetes

Unlike other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes generally does not cause birth defects. Birth defects usually originate sometime during the first trimester of pregnancy. They are more likely if you have pre-gestational diabetes, as you may have changes in blood glucose during that time. If you have gestational diabetes, you most likely had normal blood sugar levels during your critical first trimester.

The complications of gestational diabetes are usually manageable and preventable. The key to prevention is careful control of blood sugar levels as soon as the diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made.

Infants of mothers with gestational diabetes are vulnerable to several imbalances, such as low-serum calcium and low-serum magnesium levels. In addition, gestational diabetes may cause the following:

  • Fetal macrosomia. This condition describes a baby that is considerably larger than normal. All of the nutrients your baby receives come directly from your blood. If your blood has too much glucose, your baby’s pancreas senses the high glucose levels and makes more insulin in an attempt to use this glucose. The extra glucose is then converted to fat. Even when you have gestational diabetes, your fetus is able to make all the insulin it needs. The combination of your high blood glucose levels and your baby’s high insulin levels may result in large deposits of fat that cause your baby to grow excessively large.

  • Birth injury. If your baby is large in size, it may be difficult to deliver and become injured in the process.

  • Hypoglycemia . This refers to low blood sugar in your baby right after delivery. This problem happens if your blood sugar levels have been consistently high, causing the fetus to have a high level of insulin in its circulation. After delivery, your baby continues to have a high insulin level, but it no longer has the high level of sugar from you. This results in the newborn’s blood sugar level becoming very low. Following delivery, your baby’s blood sugar level will be tested. If the level is too low, it may be necessary to administer glucose intravenously until your baby’s blood sugar stabilizes.

  • Respiratory distress (difficulty breathing). Too much insulin or too much glucose in a baby’s system may delay lung maturation and cause respiratory problems. This is more likely if it is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy.

High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy

High blood pressure during pregnancy can lead to placental complications and slowed fetal growth. If left untreated, severe hypertension may cause dangerous seizuresstroke and even death in the mother and fetus.

If you have high blood pressure, your doctor will perform kidney function tests, ultrasounds for growth and testing of your baby more frequently to monitor your health and fetal development.

Chronic Hypertension

If you have high blood pressure before pregnancy, you will likely need to continue taking your antihypertensive medicine. Your health care provider may switch you to a safer antihypertensive medicine during pregnancy to help manage your condition.

Gestational Hypertension

Gestational hypertension occurs most often during a young woman’s first pregnancy. You are more likely to develop gestational hypertension during a twin pregnancy or if you had blood pressure problems during a previous pregnancy.

Pre-eclampsia (formerly called toxemia) is characterized by pregnancy-induced high blood pressure. This condition is usually accompanied by protein in the urine and may cause swelling due to fluid retention. If you have pre-eclampsia, you may need bed rest. Eclampsia, the most severe form of this condition, is diagnosed when you have a seizure caused by pre-eclampsia. Your doctor may recommend hospitalization, medications and often delivery to treat pre-eclampsia or eclampsia.

 

High-Risk Pregnancy: What You Need to Know

Pregnant woman

Many conditions affecting a mother or her baby before, during or after pregnancy can designate a pregnancy as high risk. Learn what causes a high-risk pregnancy and how maternal-fetal medicine specialists can help.

Infectious Diseases and Pregnancy

Infections during pregnancy can pose a threat to your baby. Even a simple urinary tract infection, which is common during pregnancy, should be treated right away. An infection that goes untreated can lead to preterm labor and a rupturing of the membranes surrounding the fetus.

Toxoplasmosis

Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a single-celled parasite called Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Although many people may have toxoplasma infection, very few exhibit symptoms because the immune system usually keeps the parasite from causing illness. Babies who became infected with toxoplasmosis before birth can be born with serious mental or physical problems.

Toxoplasmosis often causes flulike symptoms, including swollen lymph glands or muscle aches and pains, which last for a few days to several weeks. You can be tested to see if you have developed an antibody to the illness. Fetal testing may include ultrasound and/or testing of the amniotic fluid or cord blood. Treatment may include antibiotics.

The following measures can help prevent toxoplasmosis infection:

  • Have someone who is healthy and not pregnant change your cat’s litter box, since cat feces can carry T. gondii. If this is not possible, wear gloves and clean the litter box daily. (The parasite found in cat feces can only infect you a few days after being passed.) Wash your hands well with soap and warm water afterward.

  • Wear gloves when you garden or do anything outdoors that involves handling soil. Since cats may use gardens and sandboxes as litter boxes, be cautious when handling soil/sand that could contain the parasite. Thoroughly wash your hands with soap and warm water after outdoor activities, especially before you eat or prepare any food.

  • Have someone who is healthy and not pregnant handle raw meat for you. If this is not possible, wear clean latex gloves when you touch raw meat. Wash any surfaces and utensils that may have touched the raw meat. After handling the meat, wash your hands with soap and warm water.

  • Cook all meat thoroughly. It should be cooked until it is no longer pink in the center or until the juices run clear. Do not sample meat before it is fully cooked.

Food Poisoning

If you are pregnant, you should avoid eating undercooked or raw foods because of the risk of food poisoning. Food poisoning can dehydrate a mother and deprive the fetus of nourishment. In addition, food poisoning can cause meningitis and pneumonia in a fetus, resulting in possible death.

Follow these tips to prevent food poisoning:

  • Thoroughly cook raw food from animal sources, such as beef, pork or poultry.

  • Wash raw vegetables before eating them.

  • Store uncooked meats in an area of the refrigerator that’s separate from vegetables, cooked foods and ready-to-eat foods.

  • Avoid raw (unpasteurized) milk or foods made from raw milk.

  • Wash hands, knives and cutting boards after handling uncooked foods.

Sexually Transmitted Disease

Chlamydia

Chlamydia may be associated with premature labor and rupture of the membranes.

Hepatitis

Patients with hepatitis experience inflammation of the liver, resulting in liver cell damage and destruction. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common type that occurs during pregnancy in the United States.

HBV spreads mainly through contaminated blood and blood products, sexual contact, and contaminated intravenous needles. The later in pregnancy you get the virus, the greater the risk of infecting your baby.

HBV Symptoms and Related Conditions

Signs and symptoms of HBV include jaundice (yellowing of skin, eyes and mucous membranes), fatigue, stomach pain, loss of appetite, intermittent nausea and vomiting.

Although HBV resolves in most people, about 10 percent will develop chronic HBV. HBV can lead to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosisliver cancer, liver failure and death. Infected pregnant women can pass the virus to their fetus during pregnancy and at delivery.

HBV Screening and Vaccination

A blood test for HBV is part of routine prenatal testing. If a risk of HBV is present, the following should occur:

  • Infants of HBV-positive mothers should receive hepatitis B immune globulin and the hepatitis B vaccine during the first 12 hours of birth.

  • Babies of mothers with unknown HBV status should receive the hepatitis B vaccine in the first 12 hours of birth.

  • Babies of mothers with negative HBV status should be vaccinated before leaving the hospital.

  • Premature infants weighing less than 4.5 pounds who are born to mothers with negative HBV status should have their first vaccine dose delayed until one month after birth or leaving the hospital.

All babies should complete the hepatitis B vaccine series to be fully protected from HBV infection.

HIV/AIDS

If you have HIV, you have a one in four chance of infecting your fetus with the virus if you are not on medication. AIDS is caused by HIV. This virus kills or impairs cells of the immune system and progressively destroys the body’s ability to fight infections and certain cancers. The term AIDS applies to the most advanced stages of an HIV infection.

HIV Transmission

HIV is most commonly transmitted by sexual contact with an infected partner. HIV may also be spread through contact with infected blood. This happens mostly by sharing needles, syringes or drug use equipment with someone who is infected with the virus.

According to the National Institutes of Health, HIV transmission from mother to child during pregnancy, labor/delivery or breast-feeding has accounted for nearly all AIDS cases reported among children in the United States.

HIV Symptoms

Some people may develop a flulike illness within a month or two of exposure to the HIV virus, although many people do not develop any symptoms at all when they first become infected. In adults, it may take 10 years or more for persistent or severe symptoms to surface. Symptoms may appear within two years in children born with an HIV infection.

HIV Testing and Treatment

Prenatal care that includes HIV counseling, testing and treatment for infected mothers and their children saves lives and resources. Since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began recommending routine HIV screening for all pregnant women in 1995, the estimated incidence of mother-to-child transmission has dropped by approximately 85 percent.

If you have tested positive for HIV while pregnant, your doctor may recommend:

  • Having blood tests to check the amount of virus present.

  • Taking a number of drugs during pregnancy, labor and delivery.

  • Delivering via Cesarean section if you have a high viral load.

  • Administering medicine to your newborn baby. Studies have found that giving a mother antiretroviral medicines during pregnancy, labor and delivery, and then to the baby for six weeks after delivery can reduce the chance of a mother’s transmission of HIV to her baby. This reduction is from 25 percent to less than 2 percent.

  • Refraining from breast-feeding. Studies show that breast-feeding increases the risk of HIV transmission.

Genital Herpes

Herpes is a chronic, sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). Herpes infections can cause blisters and ulcers on the mouth or face (oral herpes), or in the genital area (genital herpes). 

A first episode of genital herpes during pregnancy creates a greater risk of transmission of the virus to the newborn. Because of this risk, it is important that you avoid contracting herpes during pregnancy. Protection from genital herpes includes abstaining from sex when symptoms are present and using latex condoms between outbreaks.

For severe cases of genital herpes during pregnancy, your doctor may administer an antiviral medicine.  If you have active genital herpes (shedding the virus) at the time of delivery, your doctor will likely recommend a Cesarean delivery to prevent a potentially fatal infection in your baby. Fortunately, infection of an infant is rare among women with genital herpes infection.

 

I missed my periods now its 6 days late yesterday at night 8 pm I checked home pregnancy test but the result was negative i'm very confused I cant identify any other symptoms except white discharges and tiredness please help me out am I conceive but till now my periods was regular.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hello, You haven't mentioned about your normal menstrual cycle and the last date of menses as well. Normal cycle of 28days of menses will be having ovulation period at around 14th day of the cycle. So, 3-4 days before and after this 14th day is supposed to be the period when the chances of getting pregnant are high! And rest of the days are safe when the chances of getting pregnant are less or remote. There is an old saying - Prevention is always better than cure! So, recommend you to follow the same, use any contraceptive method (condom, oral contraceptive pills) till the time you don't want to conceive. Once you have decided to plan for a baby, then you may stop intake of any of these methods.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, I am 32 years old and pregnant by 14 weeks. I am the patient of migraine and suffering from severe migraine for last 2 months. It gets over for a day or half after every 10-15 days but then again come back on the very next day. My gynecologist has only suggested me to have crocin advance in this condition. Can someone help me to get the medicine which can be taken while pregnancy in migraine. Also I have the case if low lying placenta and have allergic to BRUFEN salts.

MBBS, MD - Anaesthesiology, FIPM
Pain Management Specialist, Pune
In pregnancy you should take as little medicine as possible. Only painkiller safe in pregnancy is paracetamol (crocin). Don't take any other painkillers as they harm the baby. You should try simple tips to avoid headache and start preventive medicine for migraine after baby is delivered. Follow these lifestyle changes to avoid headache 1. Maintain regular sleep wake cycle, even on holiday's. 2. Don't skip meals. Take regular healthy diet with adequate fluids 3. Do not consume excess caffeine / carbohydrates / alcohol or smoke. 4. Exercise daily (aerobics and cardiovascular) 5. Identify your headache trigger and try to avoid it. 6. Perform pranayam every morning.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am a housewife. I am five month pregnant. What precautions should I take to ensure smooth delivery. Thanks in advance.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Normal delivery is a natural process and all pregnancies are designed to be delivered normally. It happens without any precautions. There are no ways to prevent cesarean section. People will advise you to do clean the floor and all that but all that is not proven to be effective. No extra precaution is needed for delivering normally. There are certain things which are not in your hand i. E. Position of the baby, passage of motion by the baby inside uterus, amount of fluid by the side of baby. All these factors and many more can decide your mode of delivery.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 22 years old female. Recently I got married. 2 years before I lost my right overy becoz of cysts. I am trying to pregnancy. Am I get pregnant? What should I do?

MD-Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Sexologist, Haldwani
Hello- yes you can conceive as your one ovary is intact. Cyst are of different types and depending upon their types their treatment also differs. Uttar basti treatment in ayurveda is beneficial in all types of cyst and promotes the ovulation too. So contact your near by ayurvedic gynecologist for that,
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I'm papanna before marriage my wife having periods 2 or 3 months once, after marriage also continued same thing and she didn't get pregnancy also, please suggest what problem we are facing and any solution.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist,
Irregular cycles are normal. They tend to occur irregularly due to fluctuations in hormonal status of the body. It may also happen in some diseases like thyroid disorders, ovulation disorders etc post marriage too the irregularity may persist in few. This is not abnormal. If you both are concerned, meet a local gynecologist. The treatment of irregular menses is dependent on many factors: whetehr you want to conceive or want to avoid pregnancy. From your query it seems that you are trying for a pregnancy. If you are having regular sexual activity, then you can give your self a whole year to conceive. If you do not conceive in a year, after regular sexual activity, then you may consult a gynecologist for helping you achieve a pregnancy. You may get your wife investigated for her irregular cycles by doing blood tests, hormone tests and sonography and get treated as per the reports.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 25 years old and had a c-section 7 months back. Till now there are no periods. Came back to my pre pregnancy weight but remained with a fluffy tummy. What to do and suggest food to put on some weight.

MBBS, DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Delhi
You may not b having periods as you are breast feeding, hwever use contraception. Eat plenty of fruits, carbohydrates, proteins, some fats, nuts, milk, green vegetables. Do abdominal exercises.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am having backache for some months post pregnancy. Also from last few days since my periods started, I am feeling numbness in my fingers. I am a nursing mother and have delivered 6 months back. Please suggest if this is normal weakness or should I get some tests done.

Diploma in Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Secunderabad
Hello, generally after delivery women get into lot of problems. I would suggest you do yoga at least for 15mins in the morning. Pls don't go on heavy medication, which inturn affect other organs. Talk calcium in your diet aslo iron supplements. Which helps you keep your both strength and required blood levels. You should be on this supplements atleast for 4 to 5 months along with yoga. Please take good care of your health, bcoz in a near future when you start aging you will get into lot of problems, if you have enough blood levels in your body you wont feel numbness in your fingers. So, for initially go with foodsupplements. Which helps you keep your blood levels required with out any side effects. Calcium and iron cost you arong 2000/- last for 3 months
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My last period was on 18th of February. And my test for pregnancy is positive but feeling pain in back and now it started pain I'm burst also.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Kolkata
pain in lower abdomen and back is very common during pregnancy. At this stage use hot water bottle foamentation. Get one ultrasound to confirm pregnancy.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am suffering from prolonged periods and had a U/S today. In that scan impressions were given as Hepatomegaly With Fatty Infiltration Of The Liver. What is Hepatomegaly With Fatty Infiltration Of The Liver?

MBBS, DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Delhi
liver enlargemnt and fat deposition there all around.. You need to cut dwn all fat and grossly reduce your weight. Your periods problem will also be dealt with then
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I want to be pregnant. My last period started on 25 june and next will be on 22 july. We have intercourse on days 2 july, 4 july, 5 july and 7 july. Please tell me that can I pregnant in these days. Pls.

DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), DGO, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Hyderabad
Hi its perfect days and most fertile days. There is a definite possibilty of getting pregnancy if you have done intercourse on those days. Good luck thanks.
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed