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Dr. Manohar T Akole

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVSc

Veterinarian, Thane

42 Years Experience  ·  0 at clinic
Dr. Manohar T Akole BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVSc Veterinarian, Thane
42 Years Experience  ·  0 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Manohar T Akole
Dr. Manohar T Akole is an experienced Veterinarian in Dombivali, Thane. He has had many happy patients in his 42 years of journey as a Veterinarian. He is a BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVSc . He is currently practising at Dr. Akole's Clinic in Dombivali, Thane. Book an appointment online with Dr. Manohar T Akole on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Thane. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) - Bombay Veterinary College, Mumbai, - 1975
MVSc - Bombay Veterinary College, Mumbai, - 1978
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Veterinary Practitioners Welfare Association

Location

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Dr. Akole's Clinic

Sukhada Bunglow No 3, Amrut Manthan CHS,Shastri Nagar, Dombivili West, Landmark: Near Samrat Hotel, ThaneThane Get Directions
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Pet's Land

C-70, Kasturi Plaza, Manpada Road, Dombivili East, Landmark: Near Tata Power Lane, ThaneThane Get Directions
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Today in the afternoon we got a pigeon in our porch. It is definitely injured but it is not apparent, it is not opening one of its eyes and neck is tilting on right side. We gave it water it is drinking very less water. It is not completely grown one what should we do to comfort it? please suggest.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Please give both terramycin in powder form anti bio-tic,(make solution in water) and noroxin tablet 10mg with (make in powder form and mix with water)
2 people found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Preventive Health care: As pets age faster than humans, a year is a long time in a dog's life. We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden.
It is recommended that every pet should receive a general health evaluation once in 6 months. A preventive health visit should cover following aspects:
• Vaccination status
• Parasite control for intestinal parasites, ear mites, ticks and fleas.
• Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odours, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
• Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
• Exercise - how much exercise your dog receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your dog's ability to exercise
• Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
• Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
• Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
• Behaviour – any behaviour problems such as barking, changes in temperament, any obsessive behaviour, urinary accidents
• Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
• Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
• Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, Neutering - if it has not already been performed
• Blood tests – especially for geriatric dogs, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
6 people found this helpful

My 6 month old golden retriever is scared to go out for walks as he was bitten by stay dog for which we got the treatment now how to bringe back the confidence in him &how to prevent this kind of incident in the future

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Walk with lease saftey have a whip stick for safety of your pet. And try to mingle your pet with near by pets so he get confidence on other animal with whom he moves
2 people found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
12 people found this helpful

My Labrador dog is been affected by bugs.And now it's became a wound. What medicine should i give him? Please suggest some medicine that is available in Kerala

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Ectoparasites are problem due to miss management. Clip her hair slightly to get contact with the medicines. First give her bath with antibacterial pet shampoo available at your place . Give a dip in 0.05 % amitraj solution every 5-7 days. Replace her bedding with a clean one, trim the nails to prevent further damage of the wound while scratching.
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I have lhasa apso puppy 50days old he is not drinking water his urin is smell strong. As he not drinking water I give him milk. He eat drools starters.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Normally puppies don't like to drink water. It is better to give dahi rather than milk. You can give dry starter feed to them. When he eat dry feed then definitely drink water.
6 people found this helpful
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If a dog get fractured in his back. He is in great pain, even painkillers are not working. How many chances he have for survive?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Press the bone of the toe of the back leg. If the dog reacts in pain then chances r their. If not then thr is no hope.
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I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a day. But from yesterday onwards he's suffering from loose motions. What should I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a ...
Hi lybrate-user, stop feeding your pug with cerelac. Give cold milk or butter milk what ever it likes, provide more water. Give rest for 2-3 days. Do not force him to eat for 2-3 days. Problem will solve.
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I have got a golden retriever of 6 months and its has hurt its leg while playing .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
If he is climbing please take x-ray or if not just pain killer would do with calcium tablets please consult your vet as soon as possible
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Sir i have a gsd of 1 year & 1 month old. She is not taking her normal or pet food for last 20days. What is the prob and should i do for it? Now she is becoming weak day by day. Please suggest.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
In appetance may be cause of chronic diseases . Please consult a vet as soon as possible please do the blood profile also.
2 people found this helpful
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I have gsd cross breed female dog and she is 6 years old. 10 days back she had been coughing now and then. Now she is not coughing I gave medicine. But till today she is not taking food she use to drink only water.(she was not taking her food for th past 4 days). Please suggest me any medicine for her.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Wise to check if she has any infection and fever. Coughing could be initial sign which could have subsided, but infection could have prevailed. Share more info about her meds. Would recommend a blood test. Take care.
3 people found this helpful

I have adopted a street dog and he is around 2.5 months old. He has a tendency to eat potty. I am giving 2.5ml of osteopet twice a day. Already 1 bottle is already finished. Please suggest.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
It could b pica, eating non food items, or worms in the stomach which do not allow to absorb nutrients n minerals no matter how good quality food you gave or it could be a behavioral issue what animals want to clean up all their body excreta in order to keep their territory clean. Might hv learnt from other street dogs b4 adoption. Il suggest you deworm the puppy first and see. In three days.
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My german shepherd is 8 months old and is a very happy and energetic dog. From last 2-3 days (21/12/2015) he is foaming too much. We give him roti and meat two times daily and drools. He is eating well but I am worried for his excess salivation. I just want to know whether it is normal or not?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Darjeeling
Excessive salivation is not at all a normal thing. You did not mention the deworming and vaccination status. I think your pet needs deworming and you have to repeat it in every 3 months interval. Along with that, give him liver tonic and a syrup with digestive enzymezes. If this condition persists even after that, go for feeding ors along with antacids and antivomitic medicines. I am sure that it will be alright then.
2 people found this helpful
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My cat has suffering from fever and sneezing continuously, eating sometimes only, what do I do for my pet cat?

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Fever and sneezing are signs of systematic infection kindly take it to nearby vet. Your vet will check fever plus will check the nasal track along with lungs to access condition of respiratory tract.
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My daughter, a female pug, 5 years old who has recently developed some grey rough patches near nail roots in left paw and a slightly bigger similar patch above with hair loss. Initially, her nails bled and we started applying ay fungal topicals. The patches are still there and occasionally she limps. Any suggestion is deeply appreciated.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dear sir its seems to be a skin infection please let me know the details with photos and previous treatement and other things so we could be discussing a lot.
1 person found this helpful
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