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Dr. Brijesh Kumar Singh - Dentist, Singrauli

Dr. Brijesh Kumar Singh

BDS

Dentist, Singrauli

10 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
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Dr. Brijesh Kumar Singh BDS Dentist, Singrauli
10 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I?m dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I?m dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Brijesh Kumar Singh
He has been a practicing Dentist for 10 years. He is a BDS . Book an appointment online with Dr. Brijesh Kumar Singh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dentists online in Singrauli and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
BDS - sjm dental college & hospital chitradurga - 2008
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Indian Dental Association

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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My tongue n lower lips got burst due to which I am unable to eat any curries. Can you please suggest me any curative medicine.

MD - General Medicine
General Physician, Delhi
Use zytee gel or orasore gel. Apply it on lips three times a day for 15 minutes. Let the saliva drool from your mouth. Take becasoule capsule once daily after meals for atleast 7 days. You will be fine.
2 people found this helpful
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Hlo mere left side upr k trf side teeth m bhut pain h or wo aada tut b gya h please koi medicine suggest kre pain k lye.

BDS, MDS - Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Advanced course in maxillofacial sugery
Dentist, Lucknow
Hlo mere left side upr k trf side teeth m bhut pain h or wo aada tut b gya h please koi medicine suggest kre pain k lye.
Medicine ke liye ab der ho gayi kisi dentist ke paas jayein rct ya extraction ki jaroorat Ho sakti hai.
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My teeth are getting yellowish day by day Even I'm regularly cleaning my teeth Kindly suggest a permanent solutions for this.

BDS
Dentist,
My teeth are getting yellowish day by day Even I'm regularly cleaning my teeth Kindly suggest a permanent solutions f...
If it is due to extrinsic stain then it can be cleaned otherwise bleach is a option bit its not permanent.
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Blood is coming out of my teeth since last week. What do I do now? Should I consult a doctor?

BDS
Dentist,
Blood is coming out of my teeth since last week. What do I do now? Should I consult a doctor?
Yes, you should consult dentist. It is starting of periodontitis. After proper scaling your problem will b solved.
1 person found this helpful
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All About Different Types of Gum Disease

FWFO, MDS - Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopaedics, BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
All About Different Types of Gum Disease

Gum disease begins with the growth of bacteria in your mouth and it may end with loss of teeth. Thus, the severity of gum disease or periodontitis should not be underestimated. Tooth loss mainly happens due to the destruction of the tissue which surrounds the teeth. 

Types of gum disease:

  1. Gingivitis: Gingivitis is basically the first stage of periodontitis. It causes bleeding from the gums and also causes immense pain in the teeth.
  2. Periodontitis: In periodontitis, the gum and teeth separate. A gap is formed between the two which may cause debris to accumulate in the space and cause other infections.

Causes of gum disease:
The exact cause of gum disease is not known but here are some of the possible causes:

  1. Hormonal changes: Hormonal changes during pregnancy, menopause and puberty are just some times the gums become more sensitive and gingivitis develops.
  2. IllnessesCancer, HIV, diabetes and other illnesses may cause problems with the immune system and damage the gums. This is an example of how gingivitis is caused as a complication of other disorders.
  3. Bad habitsSmoking causes gum disease as you may already know.
  4. Poor oral hygiene: Not brushing and flossing may lead to accumulation of food materials in the mouth causing gum diseases.
  5. Family history: Family history is also a major contributing factor to what may cause gum disease.

Treatment:
The treatment prescribed for gum disease depends how deep it is set and whether it is a case of gingivitis or periodontitis. Here are the possible treatments for gum disease:

  1. Professional dental cleaning: This is the most common treatment used in the early stages of gum disease. In fact, dental cleanings are usually used to prevent it and are used as soon as tartar and plaque buildup. 
  2. Scaling and root planing: This is also a type of cleaning except that it needs to be done under a local anesthetic as there is a certain degree of pain involved in the procedure.
  3. Surgery: Surgery is also sometimes used to remove the infected pockets and put the gums back in their original place.
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Hello sir, I’m 18 years old. I have a medium gap in middle of my teeth. Could I know how to fix it and what would be the cost probably? And what’ll be the procedures as well.

BDS
Dentist, Narnaul
Hello sir, I’m 18 years old. I have a medium gap in middle of my teeth. Could I know how to fix it and what would be ...
Hi. There are two options for your treatment. One is that you can take Orthodontic treatment when you are above 21 years of age. The second option is that you can go for crowns/ caps for the upper front two teeth.
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Hi doctor my gums are swollen and it often bleed what would your prescription to be followed.?

BDS (GOLD MEDALIST)
Dentist, Jamshedpur
Hi doctor my gums are swollen and it often bleed what would your prescription to be followed.?
You have gum disease known as gingivitis with plaque deposition. Scaling will help you in this regard. Brush regularly. Use crest toothpaste for plaque. Rinse your mouth with chlorhexidine mouthwash.
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Do's and Don'ts of Tooth Brushing!

MDS Prosthodontics, BDS
Dentist, Mohali
Do's and Don'ts of Tooth Brushing!

We all think brushing is the best favour we could do to our teeth and mouth, right? No! Incorrectly done, brushing can do more damage than good. It is always advisable to check with your dentist if you are brushing the right way. In fact, a lot of periodontal diseases and issues like abrasion are due to improper brushing techniques.

Let us look at some common issues related to brushing both good and bad.

  1. Tooth brush: Pick the right one. Firstly, the length, you should be able to reach all parts of the mouth, especially the last tooth, without having to open the mouth wide. Softer bristles are always preferred.
  2. Duration: If you brush 2 to 3 times daily, each brushing should not last more than 2 minutes. Divide the mouth into 4 quadrants upper right and left, lower right and left – and spend 30 seconds on each quadrant. Longer hours of brushing can lead to wearing of the enamel.
  3. Technique: A forceful front-and-back motion can cause a V-shaped notch at the gum line, leading to a condition called abrasion. The ideal way to brush is to begin at the gumline and go about in circular motions. Ensure all surfaces, outer and inner, of all teeth are covered.
  4. Force of brushing: The idea of brushing is to remove the soft deposits of plaque, which comes off very easily with brushing. Do not exert a lot of pressure in an attempt to remove plaque. The hardened tartar or stain can anyways not be removed with brushing and will need to be removed by the dentist.
  5. Habit: Most of us are habituated to begin at the same place and go about the same routine to finish brushing. Dentists advise that it is good to begin at different places each time. As you near the end of your brushing time, you are usually tired and just want to get done with it. Changing the start and end points gives all the teeth a fair chance of getting cleaned.
  6. Storing: Do not store your toothbrush in the toilet area and with a whole lot of brushes. Both contain enough bacteria, and your brush can do without it.
  7. Timing: If you have had acidic food, wait for about half an hour before you brush. The acidic environment softens the tooth and brushing it immediately can lead to easier wearing of the enamel.
  8. Changing brush: Any time the bristles lose their flexibility, it is time to change, usually about 3 months.

Never thought there are so many things to do and avoid with brushing? You are not alone, hopefully you can plan your brushing better the next time onwards. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Dentist.

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Does leukoplakia is curable is this danger can any one tell me my tongue is burning and I show to ENT doctor he said to check blood test once vitamin b12 nd B I am worrying about this problem my tongue side curves getting white lightly and burning sensation when my tongue touches teeth it irritates me what is this can any one will tell what it is Please suggest for that..

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Does leukoplakia is curable is this danger can any one tell me my tongue is burning and I show to ENT doctor he said ...
Symptoms Leukoplakia usually occurs on your gums, the insides of your cheeks, the bottom of your mouth — beneath the tongue — and, sometimes, your tongue. It isn't usually painful and may go unnoticed for a while. Leukoplakia may appear: White or grayish in patches that can't be wiped away Irregular or flat-textured Thickened or hardened in areas Along with raised, red lesions (speckled leukoplakia or erythroplakia), which are more likely to show precancerous changes Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia causes fuzzy, white patches that resemble folds or ridges, usually on the sides of your tongue. It's often mistaken for oral thrush, an infection marked by creamy white patches that can be wiped away, which is also common in people with a weakened immune system. When to see a doctor Even though leukoplakia doesn't usually cause discomfort, sometimes it can indicate a more serious condition. See your dentist or primary care professional if you have any of the following: White plaques or sores in your mouth that don't heal on their own within two weeks Lumps or white, red or dark patches in your mouth Persistent changes in the tissues of your mouth Ear pain when swallowing Progressive reduction in the ability to open your jaw Causes Although the cause of leukoplakia is unknown, chronic irritation, such as from tobacco use, including smoking and chewing, appears to be responsible for most cases. Often, regular users of smokeless tobacco products eventually develop leukoplakia where they hold the tobacco against their cheeks. Other causes may include chronic irritation from: Jagged, broken or sharp teeth rubbing on tongue surfaces Broken or ill-fitting dentures Long-term alcohol use Your dentist can talk with you about what may be causing leukoplakia in your case. Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia results from infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Once you've been infected with EBV, the virus remains in your body for life. Normally, the virus is dormant, but if your immune system is weakened, especially from HIV/AIDS, the virus can become reactivated, leading to conditions such as hairy leukoplakia. Risk factors Tobacco use, particularly smokeless tobacco, puts you at high risk of leukoplakia and oral cancer. Long-term alcohol use increases your risk, and drinking alcohol combined with smoking increases your risk even more. Hairy leukoplakia People with HIV/AIDS are especially likely to develop hairy leukoplakia. Although the use of antiretroviral drugs has reduced the number of cases, hairy leukoplakia still affects a number of HIV-positive people, and it may be one of the first signs of HIV infection. Complications Leukoplakia usually doesn't cause permanent damage to tissues in your mouth. However, leukoplakia increases your risk of oral cancer. Oral cancers often form near leukoplakia patches, and the patches themselves may show cancerous changes. Even after leukoplakia patches are removed, the risk of oral cancer remains. Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia isn't likely to lead to cancer. But it may indicate HIV/AIDS. Prevention You may be able to prevent leukoplakia if you avoid all tobacco products or alcohol use. Talk to your doctor about methods to help you quit. If you continue to smoke or chew tobacco or drink alcohol, have frequent dental checkups. Oral cancers are usually painless until fairly advanced, so quitting tobacco and alcohol is a better prevention strategy. Hairy leukoplakia If you have a weakened immune system, you may not be able to prevent hairy leukoplakia, but identifying it early can help you receive appropriate treatment. Diagnosis Most often, your doctor diagnoses leukoplakia by: Examining the patches in your mouth Attempting to wipe off the white patches Discussing your medical history and risk factors Ruling out other possible causes Testing for cancer If you have leukoplakia, your doctor will likely test for early signs of cancer by: Oral brush biopsy. This involves removing cells from the surface of the lesion with a small, spinning brush. This is a non-invasive procedure, but does not always result in a definitive diagnosis. Excisional biopsy. This involves surgically removing tissue from the leukoplakia patch or removing the entire patch if it's small. An excision biopsy is more comprehensive and usually results in a definitive diagnosis. If the biopsy is positive for cancer and your doctor performed an excisional biopsy that removed the entire leukoplakia patch, you may not need further treatment. If the patch is large, you may be referred to an oral surgeon or ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist for treatment. Hairy leukoplakia If you have hairy leukoplakia, you'll likely be evaluated for conditions that may contribute to a weakened immune system. Treatment Leukoplakia treatment is most successful when a lesion is found and treated early, when it's small. Regular checkups are important, as is routinely inspecting your mouth for areas that don't look normal. For most people, removing the source of irritation ― such as stopping tobacco or alcohol ― clears the condition. When this isn't effective or if the lesions show early signs of cancer, the treatment plan may involve: Removal of leukoplakia patches. Patches may be removed using a scalpel, a laser or an extremely cold probe that freezes and destroys cancer cells (cryoprobe). Follow-up visits to check the area. Once you've had leukoplakia, recurrences are common. Treating hairy leukoplakia Usually, you don't need treatment for hairy leukoplakia. The condition often causes no symptoms and isn't likely to lead to mouth cancer. If your doctor recommends treatment, it may include: Medication. You may take a pill that affects your whole system (systemic medication), such as antiviral medications. These medications can suppress the Epstein-Barr virus, the cause of hairy leukoplakia. Topical treatment may also be used. Follow-up visits. Once you stop treatment, the white patches of hairy leukoplakia may return. Your doctor may recommend regular follow-up visits to monitor changes to your mouth or ongoing therapy to prevent leukoplakia patches from returning.
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Got a root canal In my upper jaw 5 years ago. Now my upper gums near my cheek hurt. What could it be. If its bacterial, could that effect the bone around that area of my face?

Dentist, Delhi
Got a root canal In my upper jaw 5 years ago. Now my upper gums near my cheek hurt. What could it be. If its bacteria...
If your swelling is adjacent the tooth that wuz rc treated then either the tooth has been reinfected or maybe you have inflammation in your gums. U will have to get this checked by an X-ray. If your tooth is infected and you may then have infected tissue In it which can yes effect the surrounding bone too.In this case you may have to get a re rct done. If it's an inflammation in your gums you can then get a professional cleaning done and yes even in this case depending upon the degree of inflammation you may have bone loss which can worsen if left untreated. please consult your doc and get your problem diagnosed asap.
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