Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Pain Above The Kneecap

I am a 14-year-old girl and hurt my knee a couple of years ago at volleyball practice (I went to spike the ball and landed in my kneecap and my whole leg hurts and my hips) and never saw a doctor. I have reoccurring pain and it came back worse than when I hurt it. What do you think it is?

Dr. Nithin Krishna K 88% (134 ratings)
MPTh/MPT, BPTh/BPT, Certificate in Kinetic Control of Low Back and Hip, Neck and Shoulder, Certificate in Barefoot Training and Injury Prevention
Physiotherapist, Bangalore
I am a 14-year-old girl and hurt my knee a couple of years ago at volleyball practice (I went to spike the ball and l...
I think you need to check with the doctor once. Take an x-ray as well. Physiotherapy will resolve your issues.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi dear doctors my mother suffering from knees pain due to arthritis and both knees are wear out so I want to know the best treatment will you help me.

Dr. Bhavesh Jani 88% (195 ratings)
BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Vadodara
Hi dear doctors my mother suffering from knees pain due to arthritis and both knees are wear out so I want to know th...
Pain in knee due to arthritis is because of degenerative changes in cartilage of knee. Signs are increase in pain while stair climbing, cross leg sitting, squatting, cracks in knee while bending or extension. All degenerative changes increases with age so I you have to prevent it for further damage of cartilage. I would suggest you following 1. Avoid squatting, cross leg sitting, stair climbing 2. Hot water fomentation three time daily for knee 3. Massage with olive oil twice daily on affected knee 4. Simple oa knee exercise basic (search on you tube) note: don't do any exercise which increases pain. Here are some exercises from my side a) exercises to improve your balance: 1. Balance on each leg in turn, barefoot, trying to hold your balance for as long as possible; 2-3 times a day; 2. Standing on one leg, go up and down on your toes slowly 3-5 times. Do more sets on the right leg. 3. Stand on one leg, and lift the other sideways 3-5 times, with full control. Repeat about 5 times on each side. You probably need to use a chair-back to steady yourself at first, but try not to hold on. B) exercises to improve your knee mobility: try to do the patellar mobilizing (pressing the kneecap to each side with the knee straight and relaxed) before you do these: 1. Lie on your stomach and bend one knee; press it gently further back, using the other leg. Hold the bent position for a count of 3, then relax. (do not force this movement at all, as the muscles won't hold the stretch if you do) repeat 3-5 times, as often as possible each day, doing more reps for the right leg. If lying on your stomach cause knee pain, place a folded towel under your thigh to lift the knee clear. 2. Sitting on an upright chair, with your knees bent to a right angle: keep you heel on the floor and turn your foot inwards and outwards gently, 3-5 times, as often as possible. Mainly for the right leg, but also the left. 3. In the bath or in a swimming pool, gently bend and straighten your knee as much as possible, without forcing the movement. C) exercises to improve your hip range and strength: 1. Lie on one side and lift the uppermost leg vertically, keeping the knee locked straight. Repeat 10 times on each side. 2. If you can, do the side-raise exercise: lie on one side and rest on your elbow so that your shoulder is lifted off the floor/bed. Lift your hips up vertically to balance on your elbow and outer side of your foot, keeping your body and legs straight. Repeat 3 times each side. 3. Lying on your back, lift one leg and describe circles in the air, keeping your knee locked straight. Repeat three times on each leg. 4. Sitting on the floor, put the soles of your feet together and try to press your knees downwards gently with your forearms. You may well have done this exercise in yoga. Repeat 3 times. If pain still persists please contact nearest physical therapy clinic. Have patience and stay positive is key for getting relief.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi Sir, I am suffering from the problem of uneven hips and heart paining. Please help me to cure it.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hi Sir, I am suffering from the problem of uneven hips and heart paining. Please help me to cure it.
6 imbalances that cause pain—and how to fix them "pain is a medical condition and a medical issue, says brett jones, owner of applied strength in pittsburgh who is certified for the functional movement screen, a system of tests and corrective exercise strategies. "it's a warning sign. The pain is there to tell you something's wrong. And that warning sign could be more serious than "you're going too hard. Jones and the other coaches consulted for this piece all had a horror story to tell-when pain in a client meant a more serious condition such as a nerve issue, thyroid issue, or even cancer. The point: if you experience regular pain while exercising-or when you're not-go to the doctor. If you've been cleared by a doc and you're still feeling discomfort, try these simple tests to see what's truly causing the pain-it could be related to an imbalance in a completely different part of your body. The good news: with these drills, stretches, and corrective exercises, you may be able to fix them-no doctors necessary. Neck pain and headaches? Could be your shoulders. If you're experiencing these symptoms and have been cleared by a doctor, check out the height of your shoulders, says aaron brooks, a biomechanics expert and owner of perfect postures in auburndale, ma. "look in the mirror and see if one shoulder is higher or lower than the other, he says. If one of your shoulders is higher than the other, you'll be strengthening one more than the other, and it may wind up pulled forward more than the other-resulting an inward rotation of that hand. "when you do a row or a press, that side's going to get pinched. There's less room in the shoulder. You can wind up with bursitis or tendonitis. Or headaches and neck pain. Fix it: if the mirror test shows they're uneven, try this single-arm doorway stretch, brooks says. To do it, stand inside the threshold of a door, and place your right forearm inside the door on the right side of the jamb, palm against the jamb at about shoulder height. In this position, twist your chest slightly through the door to stretch your chest-alternately, you can take a step forward with your right foot, keeping your left foot in the threshold. This stretch will open your chest muscles and create room in your shoulder for movement. Pair that stretch with this mid-back strengthening exercise: grab a resistance band and stretch it in front of your chest so that your arms are straight out to the sides from your shoulders, palms facing up. At the full extension of your arms, the band should be stretched out. Return to clap your hands in front, and repeat the movement. Pair these two moves-in this order-three times per week. Shoulders even? Your headaches could be from a forward-leaning head. If you don't see an imbalance in the height of your shoulders, turn to the side, says robert taylor, owner of smarter team training in baltimore. If your head is jutting far forward of your shoulders, it could ultimately decrease the amount of blood flow to your head and neck. "the head leans forward, the spine leans forward, and it puts unnecessary stress on the lower spine too, he says. With the decreased blood flow to your thinking cap, you could get headaches. Fix it: increase blood flow up top and return your head to its natural, up-tall position by strength training your neck, taylor says. Try this one-arm shrug to even things out: sit on an upright bench, like one you'd use for a shoulder press. Holding a dumbbell in your right hand, place your left hand under your left butt cheek and grab the side of the seat. Let your right hand hang down straight by your side and pull your shoulder blades back and together. Now raise your right shoulder up towards your ear-raise it straight up instead of rolling your shoulder. Hold for a beat at the top, and then return to the start position. Complete a set of 10, and repeat on the other side. Knee pain when you run? Could be your hips. "the knee has two bad neighbors-the hip and the ankle, jones says. The pain you feel in your knee could very well be tightness or immobility in those bad neighbors. "they sweep all their leaves into the knee's yard. Everyone blames the knee, but it's the neighbors. To see if your hips have a proper level of mobility, lay on your back in a doorway so that the middle of your kneecap is right on the threshold. Relax your arms at your sides, palms up. Bring your feet together, toes pointed at the ceiling. Pull your toes towards your shins to create a 90-degree angle at the ankle. Keep one leg straight and still as you slowly raise the other leg until either your knee bends on your raising leg, or your bottom foot bends or turns out to the side. "see if the knobby part of your ankle can make it past the door frame, jones says. If it does, your hips are plenty mobile-check the ankle test below to see if that's causing some knee issues. If either ankle can't make it, foam roll your hips and glutes, and then work on this stretch using a belt or strap for instant improvement. Fix it: lying in the same position as during the test, wrap a strap or belt around one foot and raise it until you just start to feel a stretch-not to the level where it's all the stretch you can take, but just the beginning of the stretch, jones says. Once here, bring your other leg up to meet it. Return the non-strapped leg to the floor. At this point, you may find that the strapped leg can come up a little higher. When it does, bring the non-strapped leg up to meet it again. Continue until you no longer feel progress in the strapped leg, and switch. Hips moving ok? Check your ankles. If your hips are mobile (and even if they're not), ankle mobility can also lead to knee pain, says mike perry, owner of skill of strength in north chelmsford, mass. Who is certified in the functional movement screen. To see how mobile your ankles are (or aren't), assume a one-knee position facing a wall. Your knees should both form 90-degree angles, and the toe of your planted foot should be about four inches from the wall. In this position, perry says, try to glide your knee over the pinky toe to touch the wall without lifting your heel. If you can reach the wall, your ankle is gliding correctly. If your foot comes up before your knee touches the wall, your calves are "incredibly tight, perry says. Fix it: to help remedy this issue, foam roll your calves and try this variation on that ankle test from brett jones. Assume the same half-kneeling position, and place the point of a broomstick on the pinky toe of your planted foot. Hold the stick so it's touching the outside of your knee. With the stick in this position, keeping your knee from flaring out to the side, glide the knee forward slowly, stopping when your heel leaves the ground. If you perform this as a drill, jones says, you can see as much as half an inch of improvement in the first session. If you feel pain during the drill, stop and consult a physician. Lower-back tightness? Might be your hips. As with knee pain, back discomfort often isn't a back problem at all, brooks says. If one side of your pelvis is higher than the other, it can result in back pain, hip pain, groin pain, or even knee pain. "if you try to do a lunge, the knee on the high side will cave in and the hip will angle inward, brooks says. The repercussions of this change over time can be knee pain, a patella tear, a medial meniscus injury, or hip bursitis. But back to your back-the unevenness of your hips can pull on your lower back, causing that tightness while sitting all day. Fix it: if you notice your hips are uneven, try this hip abduction exercise. Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, hip-width apart (the classic sit-up position). Wrap a small resistance band around your knees so that it's already a little tight while your knees are together. Now press out against the strap to separate your knees until they form a v-shape, holding at the outermost edge of the press for a few moments. This move helps to fix the hip imbalance because "in the lying position, the muscles that are causing the pelvis to be out of alignment are shut off, brooks says. Repeat for 2 sets of 20 reps, 3 times per week.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello doctor, my mother-in-law is around 55+age. From past 5months she is experiencing pain above elbow of left. When having pain I see a bit swelling is also there like a lump. We are worried about it. When asked a doctor, they just gave medicine just by physical observation. I would like to know what is the reason. She is experiencing pain when done more work. The medicine which doctor gave were curing temporarily but later after some pain continues. Please suggest us.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hello doctor, my mother-in-law is around 55+age. From past 5months she is experiencing pain above elbow of left. When...
It is called as rheumatic arthritis. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Wear elbow brace and wrist brace which will make her to feel warm and that will make the joints become firm. Hot water fermentation will help knee cap will also help to prevent the damaged cartilages. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Which joints you have pain? If your proximal joints (ie. Shoulder, hip & knee has pain) then you can pour hot (warm) water in that area to reduce the inflammation. If you have pain in the distal joints ie. Wrist, fingers, ankle, toes then you can wear either elbow brace or wrist brace which will help you to feel warm and very protective. And also immerse the distal joints in the hot water tub which will help you to reduce the pain. Consult the near by physiotherapy clinic and also consult a general physician to check with your esr levels to check whether you have inflammation the sound what you hear is called as crepitus /ˈkrɛpɪtəs/ (also termed crepitation) is a medical term to describe the grating, crackling or popping sounds and sensations experienced under the skin and joints or a crackling sensation due to the presence of air in the subcutaneous tissue. Popping knees and crackling knuckles. Occasionally hearing pops, snaps, and crackles when you bend your knees doesn’t necessarily mean you have arthritis. The kneecap (patella) is the small, convex bone that sits at the front of the knee, shielding the joint.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My rheumatologist suggested me gabapentin 300 mg twice for my joint pains but I am confused should I take it for 3 months long or not because I was past depression patient for a year it was post natal depression lasted for a year now I am worried about the withdrawal symptoms and side-effects of gabapentin please explain me about the drug and tel me is taking gabapentin safe.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
My rheumatologist suggested me gabapentin 300 mg twice for my joint pains but I am confused should I take it for 3 mo...
It is called as rheumatic arthritis. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Wear elbow brace and wrist brace which will make her to feel warm and that will make the joints become firm. Hot water fermentation will help knee cap will also help to prevent the damaged cartilages. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Which joints you have pain? If your proximal joints (ie. Shoulder, hip & knee has pain) then you can pour hot (warm) water in that area to reduce the inflammation. If you have pain in the distal joints ie. Wrist, fingers, ankle, toes then you can wear either elbow brace or wrist brace which will help you to feel warm and very protective. And also immerse the distal joints in the hot water tub which will help you to reduce the pain. Consult the near by physiotherapy clinic and also consult a general physician to check with your esr levels to check whether you have inflammation the sound what you hear is called as crepitus /ˈkrɛpɪtəs/ (also termed crepitation) is a medical term to describe the grating, crackling or popping sounds and sensations experienced under the skin and joints or a crackling sensation due to the presence of air in the subcutaneous tissue. Popping knees and crackling knuckles. Occasionally hearing pops, snaps, and crackles when you bend your knees doesn’t necessarily mean you have arthritis. The kneecap (patella) is the small, convex bone that sits at the front of the knee, shielding the joint.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Whenever I bend my knee, my kneecap shifts and there is a loud clicking sound. What is this?

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Whenever I bend my knee, my kneecap shifts and there is a loud clicking sound. What is this?
Resisted terminal knee extension: make a loop with a piece of elastic tubing by tying a knot in both ends. Close the knot in a door at knee height. Step into the loop with your injured leg so the tubing is around the back of your knee. Lift the other foot off the ground and hold onto a chair for balance, if needed. Bend the knee with tubing about 45 degrees. Slowly straighten your leg, keeping your thigh muscle tight as you do this. Repeat 15 times. Do 2 sets of 15. If you need an easier way to do this, stand on both legs for better support while you do the exercise. Standing calf stretch: stand facing a wall with your hands on the wall at about eye level. Keep as arthritis is very common that you get generally bilaterally. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am suffering from pain in my knee and some sound produce in it so, I am suffering from this from some week so, I hope you will find some conclusion for my disease so, thanks and please help me as fast you can.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I am suffering from pain in my knee and some sound produce in it so, I am suffering from this from some week so, I ho...
As arthritis is very common that you get generally bilaterally. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Simple knee exerciesspecific knee exercises will also help ie. Keeping ball underneath the knee and keep pressing it. That's the simple exercise which will help you to strengthen the knee ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Knee pain more than 2 weeks:if your knee is paining since 2 weeks, then you have to rethink whether you had any injury in the previous years. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. As arthritis is very common if anyone would've neglected any injury in the previous years. You can take ultrasonic therapy in one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics which would help to heal the damaged cartilages along with shortwave diathermy which would help to improve the blood circulation. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. You may do all of these exercises right away. It’s important to stretch the muscles in the back and on the side of your leg. It is also important to strengthen the muscles in your hip and on the top of your thigh so your kneecap won't dislocate again. •standing hamstring stretch: put the heel of the leg on your injured side on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your leg straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips, until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you don't roll your shoulders or bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •quad sets: sit on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent. Press the back of the knee of your injured leg against the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •straight leg raise: lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend the knee on your uninjured side and place the foot flat on the floor. Tighten the thigh muscle on your injured side and lift your leg about 8 inches off the floor. Keep your leg straight and your thigh muscle tight. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •side-lying leg lift: lie on your uninjured side. Tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 centimeters) away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight and lower it slowly. Do 2 sets of 15. •prone hip extension: lie on your stomach with your legs straight out behind you. Fold your arms under your head and rest your head on your arms. Draw your belly button in towards your spine and tighten your abdominal muscles. Tighten the buttocks and thigh muscles of the leg on your injured side and lift the leg off the floor about 8 inches. Keep your leg straight. Hold for 5 seconds. Then lower your leg and relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •step-up: stand with the foot of your injured leg on a support 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) high --like a small step or block of wood. Keep your other foot flat on the floor. Shift your weight onto the injured leg on the support. Straighten your injured leg as the other leg comes off the floor. Return to the starting position by bending your injured leg and slowly lowering your uninjured leg back to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •wall squat with a ball: stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall. Look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 3 feet (90 centimeters) from the wall and shoulder's width apart. Place a soccer or basketball-sized ball behind your back. Keeping your back against the wall, slowly squat down to a 45-degree angle. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 2 sets of 15. •knee stabilization: wrap a piece of elastic tubing around the ankle of your uninjured leg. Tie a knot in the other end of the tubing and close it in a door at about ankle height. •stand facing the door on the leg without tubing (your injured leg) and bend your knee slightly, keeping your thigh muscles tight. Stay in this position while you move the leg with the tubing (the uninjured leg) straight back behind you. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn 90 degrees so the leg without tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing away from your body. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn 90 degrees again so your back is to the door. Move the leg with tubing straight out in front of you. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn your body 90 degrees again so the leg with tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing across your body. Do 2 sets of 15. •your injured leg back with your heel on the floor. Keep the other leg forward with the knee bent. Turn your back foot slightly inward (as if you were pigeon-toed). Slowly lean into the wall until you feel a stretch in the back of your calf. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times. Do this exercise several times each day. •clam exercise: lie on your uninjured side with your hips and knees bent and feet together. Slowly raise your top leg toward the ceiling while keeping your heels touching each other. Hold for 2 seconds and lower slowly. Do 2 sets of 15 repetitions. •iliotibial band stretch, side-bending: cross one leg in front of the other leg and lean in the opposite direction from the front leg. Reach the arm on the side of the back leg over your head while you do this. Hold this position for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times and then switch legs and repeat the exercise.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

HI, Hot compress or cold compress. Which type of compress is useful in knee joint pain.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
HI, Hot compress or cold compress. Which type of compress is useful in knee joint pain.
As arthritis is very common that you get generally bilaterally. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Simple knee exerciesspecific knee exercises will also help ie. Keeping ball underneath the knee and keep pressing it. That's the simple exercise which will help you to strengthen the knee ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Knee pain more than 2 weeks:if your knee is paining since 2 weeks, then you have to rethink whether you had any injury in the previous years. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. As arthritis is very common if anyone would've neglected any injury in the previous years. You can take ultrasonic therapy in one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics which would help to heal the damaged cartilages along with shortwave diathermy which would help to improve the blood circulation. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. You may do all of these exercises right away. It’s important to stretch the muscles in the back and on the side of your leg. It is also important to strengthen the muscles in your hip and on the top of your thigh so your kneecap won't dislocate again. •standing hamstring stretch: put the heel of the leg on your injured side on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your leg straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips, until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you don't roll your shoulders or bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •quad sets: sit on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent. Press the back of the knee of your injured leg against the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •straight leg raise: lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend the knee on your uninjured side and place the foot flat on the floor. Tighten the thigh muscle on your injured side and lift your leg about 8 inches off the floor. Keep your leg straight and your thigh muscle tight. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •side-lying leg lift: lie on your uninjured side. Tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 centimeters) away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight and lower it slowly. Do 2 sets of 15. •prone hip extension: lie on your stomach with your legs straight out behind you. Fold your arms under your head and rest your head on your arms. Draw your belly button in towards your spine and tighten your abdominal muscles. Tighten the buttocks and thigh muscles of the leg on your injured side and lift the leg off the floor about 8 inches. Keep your leg straight. Hold for 5 seconds. Then lower your leg and relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •step-up: stand with the foot of your injured leg on a support 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) high --like a small step or block of wood. Keep your other foot flat on the floor. Shift your weight onto the injured leg on the support. Straighten your injured leg as the other leg comes off the floor. Return to the starting position by bending your injured leg and slowly lowering your uninjured leg back to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •wall squat with a ball: stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall. Look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 3 feet (90 centimeters) from the wall and shoulder's width apart. Place a soccer or basketball-sized ball behind your back. Keeping your back against the wall, slowly squat down to a 45-degree angle. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 2 sets of 15. •knee stabilization: wrap a piece of elastic tubing around the ankle of your uninjured leg. Tie a knot in the other end of the tubing and close it in a door at about ankle height. •stand facing the door on the leg without tubing (your injured leg) and bend your knee slightly, keeping your thigh muscles tight. Stay in this position while you move the leg with the tubing (the uninjured leg) straight back behind you. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn 90 degrees so the leg without tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing away from your body. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn 90 degrees again so your back is to the door. Move the leg with tubing straight out in front of you. Do 2 sets of 15. •turn your body 90 degrees again so the leg with tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing across your body. Do 2 sets of 15. •your injured leg back with your heel on the floor. Keep the other leg forward with the knee bent. Turn your back foot slightly inward (as if you were pigeon-toed). Slowly lean into the wall until you feel a stretch in the back of your calf. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times. Do this exercise several times each day. •clam exercise: lie on your uninjured side with your hips and knees bent and feet together. Slowly raise your top leg toward the ceiling while keeping your heels touching each other. Hold for 2 seconds and lower slowly. Do 2 sets of 15 repetitions. •iliotibial band stretch, side-bending: cross one leg in front of the other leg and lean in the opposite direction from the front leg. Reach the arm on the side of the back leg over your head while you do this. Hold this position for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times and then switch legs and repeat the exercise.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, What is early rheumatoid arthritis? I’m seeing some secondary like fatigue, inflammation, depression. The doctor took esr, rf, crp. Esr was around 32. My doubt is if my ra develops, are swelling, redness, pain, warm ness necessarily need to show up as initial symptoms? Early ra means the time calculated from the time of appearance of any changes near joints or of even any other signs like fatigue or inflammation throughout body?

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hi, What is early rheumatoid arthritis? I’m seeing some secondary like fatigue, inflammation, depression. The doctor ...
It is called as rheumatic arthritis. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Wear elbow brace and wrist brace which will make her to feel warm and that will make the joints become firm. Hot water fermentation will help knee cap will also help to prevent the damaged cartilages. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Which joints you have pain? If your proximal joints (ie. Shoulder, hip & knee has pain) then you can pour hot (warm) water in that area to reduce the inflammation. If you have pain in the distal joints ie. Wrist, fingers, ankle, toes then you can wear either elbow brace or wrist brace which will help you to feel warm and very protective. And also immerse the distal joints in the hot water tub which will help you to reduce the pain. Consult the near by physiotherapy clinic and also consult a general physician to check with your esr levels to check whether you have inflammation the sound what you hear is called as crepitus /ˈkrɛpɪtəs/ (also termed crepitation) is a medical term to describe the grating, crackling or popping sounds and sensations experienced under the skin and joints or a crackling sensation due to the presence of air in the subcutaneous tissue. Popping knees and crackling knuckles. Occasionally hearing pops, snaps, and crackles when you bend your knees doesn’t necessarily mean you have arthritis. The kneecap (patella) is the small, convex bone that sits at the front of the knee, shielding the joint. If your pain is more in the proximal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Wear elbow brace and wrist brace which will make her to feel warm and that will make the joints become firm. Hot water fermentation will helpknee cap will also help to prevent the damaged cartilagesif your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. If your proximal joints (ie. Shoulder, hip & knee has pain) then you can pour hot (warm) water in that area to reduce the inflammation. If you have pain in the distal joints ie. Wrist, fingers, ankle, toes then you can wear either elbow brace or wrist brace which will help you to feel warm and very protective. And also immerse the distal joints in the hot water tub which will help you to reduce the pain.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am having night fall problem since last 7-8 years. I am having minimum 10 times a month. Today I am physically very weak and having back pain and joint pain. Numbness and fatigue problem is also there. Muscles are tight.

Dr. Julie Mercy J David 91% (31661 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I am having night fall problem since last 7-8 years. I am having minimum 10 times a month. Today I am physically very...
If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Wear elbow brace and wrist brace which will make her to feel warm and that will make the joints become firm. Hot water fermentation will help knee cap will also help to prevent the damaged cartilages. If your pain is more in the distal joints, ie. In the upper limbs if the pain is present in the fingers/wrist and in the lower limbs it the pain is present in the toes/ ankle, then we shall definitely say it is rheumatic arthritis. Which joints you have pain? If your proximal joints (ie. Shoulder, hip & knee has pain) then you can pour hot (warm) water in that area to reduce the inflammation. If you have pain in the distal joints ie. Wrist, fingers, ankle, toes then you can wear either elbow brace or wrist brace which will help you to feel warm and very protective. And also immerse the distal joints in the hot water tub which will help you to reduce the pain. Consult the near by physiotherapy clinic and also consult a general physician to check with your esr levels to check whether you have inflammation the sound what you hear is called as crepitus /ˈkrɛpɪtəs/ (also termed crepitation) is a medical term to describe the grating, crackling or popping sounds and sensations experienced under the skin and joints or a crackling sensation due to the presence of air in the subcutaneous tissue. Popping knees and crackling knuckles. Occasionally hearing pops, snaps, and crackles when you bend your knees doesn’t necessarily mean you have arthritis. The kneecap (patella) is the small, convex bone that sits at the front of the knee, shielding the joint. This is a general low back ache and for this you can follow these measures: one keep a pillow right under the knee while sleeping, next is you can keep ice in the painful area for about 5--10 minutes, if pain still persists you can stretch your body by twisting the waist on both sides how we used to do in the school drill similarly you can try which will help you relax as well will reduce the pain. It looks like you are is important to check that. Anaemia always leads to the symptoms of being tired and also having back / leg pain though there may not be any pathological reasons for back pain. •standing hamstring stretch: place the heel of your injured leg on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your knee straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you do not roll your shoulders and bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •cat and camel: get down on your hands and knees. Let your stomach sag, allowing your to curve downward. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Then arch your back and hold for 5 seconds. Do 3 sets of 10. •quadruped arm/leg raise: get down on your hands and knees. Tighten your abdominal muscles to stiffen your spine. While keeping your abdominals tight, raise one arm and the opposite leg away from you. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Lower your arm and leg slowly and alternate sides. Do this 10 times on each side.•pelvic tilt: lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Tighten your abdominal muscles and push your lower back into the floor. Hold this position for 5 seconds, then relax. Do 3 sets of 10. •partial curl: lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Tighten your stomach muscles. Tuck your chin to your chest. With your hands stretched out in front of you, curl your upper body forward until your shoulders clear the floor. Hold this position for 3 seconds. Don't hold your breath. It helps to breathe out as you lift your shoulders up. Relax. Repeat 10 times. Build to 3 sets of 10. To challenge yourself, clasp your hands behind your head and keep your elbows out to the side. •gluteal stretch: lying on your back with both knees bent, rest the ankle of one leg over the knee of your other leg. Grasp the thigh of the bottom leg and pull that knee toward your chest. You will feel a stretch along the buttocks and possibly along the outside of your hip on the top leg. Hold this for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •extension exercise: lie face down on the floor for 5 minutes. If this hurts too much, lie face down with a pillow under your stomach. This should relieve your leg or back pain. When you can lie on your stomach for 5 minutes without a pillow, then you can continue with the rest of this exercise.
Submit FeedbackFeedback