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Headache And Vomiting In Adults

Hi I have pimples, dermatologist I consult in online told me to take minoz er 65, it is helpful to treat pimples or not? I am wearing glass for long sight, should this medicine cause blurred vision for me?

Hi I have pimples, dermatologist I consult in online told me to take minoz er 65, it is helpful to treat pimples or n...
treatment depends on the grade...Acne or pimples... Due to hormonal changes..Oily skin causes it...Common in adolescent age...May occur in adults also.. Food like Oily foods, ice cream, chocolate and sweets increase it.. Treatment depends on the grade of pimples or acne..So, please send photos by direct online consultation as it's a must to see which grade of pimples or acne for accurate diagnosis and treatment.
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Hello Dr. I am suffering from yellowish vomiting along with pain in abdominal region area and headache and fever and not my eye is yellow not nails tongue colour is pinkish I also checked my blood Impression was increment of bilirubin. please suggest what I do.

Hello Dr. I am suffering from yellowish vomiting along with pain in abdominal region area and headache and fever and ...
High bilirubin levels usually means that there may be an underlying problem involving the red blood cells, liver, or gallbladder Anemia Viral hepatitis. Treatment for elevated bilirubin in adults depends on the underlying problems, so you need cbc, usg abdomen, liver function test etc to know exact causes of increasing of bilirubin on the basis of symptoms can say it may be jaundice, but confirm with given above test.
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What is the symptoms of Dengue fever. We have a doubt. My friend is really scared. Please tell.

What is the symptoms of Dengue fever.
We have a doubt. My friend is really scared. Please tell.
Symptoms of Dengue Fever Symptoms, which usually begin four to six days after infection and last for up to 10 days, may include Sudden, high fever Severe headaches Pain behind the eyes Severe joint and muscle pain Fatigue Nausea Vomiting Skin rash, which appears two to five days after the onset of fever Mild bleeding (such a nose bleed, bleeding gums, or easy bruising) Sometimes, symptoms are mild and can be mistaken for those of the flu or another viral infection. Younger children and people who have never had the infection before tend to have milder cases than older children and adults. However, serious problems can develop.
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What medications are best for the treatment of asthma? What are their side effects?

What medications are best for the treatment of asthma? What are their side effects?
LABA and ICS combination by inhalation with spacer. Can cause side effect of steroid, which are rare if given under medical supervision. can cause osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension in adults and stunted growth in childrens
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Hello, I am the kind of person who eats 5- 6 times meals in a day however from past 4-5 days ,I am not feeling much hungry n feeling nausea all the time. Having weakness also. I do gym regularly. No signs of abdomen pain or headache please help.

Hello, thank you for informing me about your problem, Overview Fatigue is a constant state of tiredness, even when you’ve gotten your usual amount of sleep. This symptom develops over time and causes a drop in your physical, emotional, and psychological energy levels. You’re also more likely to feel unmotivated to participate in or do activities you normally enjoy. Some other signs of fatigue include feeling: physically weaker than usual tired, despite rest as though you have less stamina or endurance than normal mentally tired and moody Loss of appetite means you don’t have the same desire to eat as you used to. Signs of decreased appetite include not wanting to eat, unintentional weight loss, and not feeling hungry. The idea of eating food may make you feel nauseous, as if you might vomit after eating. Long-term loss of appetite is also known as anorexia, which can have a medical or psychological cause. It may be a warning sign from your body when you feel fatigue and loss of appetite together. Read on to see what conditions may cause these symptoms. What causes fatigue and loss of appetite? Fatigue and loss of appetite are symptoms of several health conditions. The condition can be as common as the flu or a sign of something more serious like cancer. Often a loss of appetite can cause fatigue, especially if you aren’t getting enough calories or nutrients. Chronic, or long-term, pain can also interfere with your appetite and cause fatigue. Some conditions that can cause continuous pain include: fibromyalgia migraines nerve damage postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) pain after surgery Other causes of fatigue and loss of appetite include: chronic fatigue syndrome pregnancy flu and common cold postpartum depression heat emergencies premenstrual syndrome (PMS) alcohol withdrawal syndrome Medications You may also feel more tired than usual when your body is fighting off infection. Certain medications have side effects like nausea and drowsiness. These side effects can decrease your appetite and cause fatigue. Medications that are known to cause these symptoms include: sleeping pills antibiotics blood pressure medications diuretics anabolic steroids codeine morphine Psychological These disorders can affect your appetite and energy level: stress grief bipolar disorder anorexia bulimia anxiety depression Fatigue and loss of appetite in children You should bring your child to a doctor if they are feeling fatigued and have a decreased appetite. These symptoms can develop more quickly in children than adults. Potential causes include: depression or anxiety acute appendicitis cancer anemia lupus constipation intestinal worms Other causes include: slowed growth rate having recently taken antibiotics not getting enough rest not eating a balanced diet Fatigue and loss of appetite in older adults Fatigue and decreased appetite in older adults are both common occurrences. Some studies suggest increased age as a risk factor for fatigue. Common causes of these symptoms in older adults include: heart disease hypothyroidism rheumatoid arthritis chronic lung disease or COPD depression cancer neurological disorders, like multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease sleep disorders hormone changes Related conditions Other health conditions and symptoms that accompany fatigue and loss of appetite include: anemia Addison’s disease cirrhosis, or liver damage congestive heart failure HIV/AIDS gastroparesis celiac disease kidney disease Crohn’s disease heumatoid arthritis chemotherapy When to seek medical help Get immediate medical help if you’re experiencing fatigue and loss of appetite along with: confusion dizziness blurred vision an irregular or racing heartbeat chest pain shortness of breath fainting sudden weight loss difficulty tolerating cold temperatures You also should make an appointment to see your doctor if you’re experiencing these symptoms after taking a new medication, even after you’ve taken it for several days. Seek emergency attention if you or someone you know has thoughts of harming themselves. How will your doctor diagnose fatigue and loss of appetite? While there isn’t a specific test for fatigue and loss of appetite, your doctor will review your medical history, perform a physical exam, and ask about your other symptoms. This will help narrow down potential causes so that your doctor can order the right tests. After asking questions about your health, they may order: •blood tests to search for potential conditions, like hypothyroidism, celiac disease, or HIV CT scan or ultrasound scan of the stomach an EKG or stress test for suspected cardiac involvement gastric emptying test, which can diagnose delayed gastric emptying How do you treat fatigue and loss of appetite? Your doctor will prescribe treatments and therapies depending on your underlying condition. Pain relief may help ease the symptoms. If medication is the cause of your fatigue and loss of appetite, your doctor may adjust your dosage or swap the medication. Treating fatigue may include learning how to increase energy in your daily life. This can mean: getting more exercise creating a schedule for activity and rest talk therapy learning about self-care Treating loss of appetite may include formulating a flexible meal schedule and incorporating favorite foods into meals. Studies also show that enhancing the taste and smell of foods can increase appetite in older adults. They found that adding sauces and seasonings resulted in a 10 percent increase in calorie consumption. Other methods used to treat fatigue or loss of appetite include: appetite stimulants like Marinol low-dose corticosteroids to increase appetite sleeping pills to help you sleep better at night physical therapy to slowly increase exercise antidepressants or antianxiety medications, for depression or anxiety anti-nausea medications like Zofran for nausea caused by medical treatments Counseling or participating in a support group may also help reduce depression and anxiety-related causes of fatigue and loss of appetite. How can I prevent or treat fatigue and loss of appetite at home? Your doctor or dietitian can offer suggestions for improving your appetite and reducing fatigue. For example, you may need to change your diet to include more high-calorie, protein-rich foods, and fewer sugary or empty calorie options. Taking your food in liquid form such as green smoothies or protein drinks may be easier on your stomach. If you have trouble with big meals, you can also try eating small meals throughout the day to help keep food down. While fatigue and loss of appetite can’t always be prevented, living a healthy lifestyle can minimize lifestyle-related causes of fatigue and appetite loss. You may feel less fatigued and have more energy if you eat a balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, and lean meats, exercise regularly, and sleep for at least seven hours each night. Feel free to get connected and clarify your queries in the private section. Wish you best of health!
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Hi Sir, My brother has typhoid igg positive. He has stomach pain slightly and headache vomiting and joint pain. Suggest the proper medicine of this decease.

MR MONISANKAR YOU HAVE NOT MENTIONED THE AGE , PERIOD OF PROBLEM AND TREATMENT TAKEN PRESUMING ADULT AND NEW PATINT YOU ARE ADVISED TO TAKE FOLLOWING MEASURES 1. TAKE LIGHT MEAL 2. DRINK BOOLED COOL WATER AND TAKE LIQUID DIET PREFERABLY 3. CIPROBID 500 MG 2 TIMES DAILY FOR 2Q DAYS 4. ÇOBADEX 1 CAP DAILY AFTER LUNCH
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Hi Sir, What are the symptoms of dengue fever? Explain about children and adults. Please help me on it.

Hi Sir, What are the symptoms of dengue fever? Explain about children and adults. Please help me on it.
Hi, Severe breaking pain in bone and joints as if someone has been beaten by stick. Reddish or purpuric rashes on the body, fleeting/shifting joint pain associated with swelling may occur. High temperature of 103 to 105 degrees F. May occur which gets subsided and may relapse again within three to four days. For more info call us or take the appointment.
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Is Budesonide Inhalation harmful? Actually I have been using Digihaler FB400 for three months. I intend to know whether the composition of formoterol fumarate and budesonide is harmful.

Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation is used in adults and children 6 years of age and older. Budesonide suspension (liquid) for oral inhalation is used in children 12 months to 8 years of age. Budesonide belongs to a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by decreasing swelling and irritation in the airways to allow for easier breathing. Every medication has some amount of Side Effects associated with it and it is only a small number of people in which a few Side Effects are seen. If you think you are having Side Effects then you need to talk to your doctor but just to mention the list of Side Effects associated with this medications are as follows Budesonide inhalation may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache stuffy or runny nose sore throat diarrhea loss of appetite stomach pain difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep neck or back pain ear infections nosebleeds Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms or those in the SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS section, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment: white spots or sores in your mouth rash hives itching swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs hoarseness difficulty breathing or swallowing wheezing cough chest pain anxiety fever, chills, or other signs of infection tiredness nausea vomiting weakness changes in vision.
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Is there is any precautionary vaccination of swine flu, their effectiveness and how I can get it.

Is there is any precautionary vaccination of swine flu, their effectiveness and how I can get it.
H1N1 influenza is sometimes called "swine flu" because it is usually found in pigs. You cannot become infected with H1N1 influenza from eating pork products. The injectable form of H1N1 influenza virus vaccine is a "killed virus" vaccine and will not cause you to become ill with the flu virus that it contains. View Slideshows Natural Cold & Flu Remedies Slideshow Anatomy of a Sore Throat Slideshow Flu Slideshow: 10 Foods to Eat When You Have the Flu Related Diseases Images & Quizzes Index Natural Cold & Flu Remedies Slideshow Anatomy of a Sore Throat Slideshow Flu Slideshow: 10 Foods to Eat When You Have the Flu Patient Comments: Swine Flu - Concerns and Risks Patient Comments: Swine Flu - Symptoms and Signs Patient Comments: Swine Flu - Treatment Swine flu (H1N1 and H3N2v influenza virus) facts What is the swine flu? How is swine flu transmitted? Is swine flu contagious? What is the incubation period for swine flu? What is the contagious period for swine flu? How long does the swine flu last? What causes swine flu? Why is swine flu now infecting humans? What are swine flu symptoms and signs? What tests do health care professionals use to diagnose swine flu? What types of health care professionals treat swine flu? What is the treatment for swine flu? What is the history of swine flu in humans? What are the risk factors for swine flu? Is it possible to prevent swine flu with a vaccine? Is it possible to prevent swine flu if the swine flu vaccine (or other flu strain vaccines) is not readily available? Are there home remedies for swine flu? Was swine flu (H1N1) a cause of an epidemic or pandemic in the 2009-2010 flu season? What is the prognosis (outlook) and complications for patients who get swine flu? Where can I find more information about swine flu (H1N1 and H3N2v)? Swine flu (H1N1 and H3N2v influenza virus) facts Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by influenza viruses that infect the respiratory tract of pigs and result in a barking cough, decreased appetite, nasal secretions, and listless behavior; the virus can be transmitted to humans. Swine flu viruses may mutate (change) so that they are easily transmissible among humans. The April 2009 swine flu outbreak (pandemic) was due to infection with the H1N1 virus and was first observed in Mexico. Symptoms of swine flu in humans are similar to most influenza infections: fever (100 F or greater), cough, nasal secretions, fatigue, and headache. The incubation period for the disease is about one to four days. Swine flu is contagious about one day before symptoms develop to about five to seven days after symptoms develop; some patients may be contagious for a longer time span. The disease lasts about three to seven days with more serious infections lasting about nine to 10 days. Vaccination is the best way to prevent or reduce the chances of becoming infected with influenza viruses. Primary-care specialists, pediatricians, and emergency-medicine doctors usually treat the disease, but other specialists may be consulted if the flu is severe and/or complicated. Two antiviral agents, zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu), have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu if taken within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. Some researchers disagree and suggest the antiviral agents have no effect. There are various methods listed in this article to help individuals from getting the flu. Home remedies are available, but patients should check with their doctors before use; over-the-counter medications may help reduce symptoms. The most serious complication of the flu is pneumonia. What is the swine flu? Swine flu (swine influenza) is a respiratory disease caused by viruses (influenza viruses) that infect the respiratory tract of pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, a barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine flu produces most of the same symptoms in pigs as human flu produces in people. Swine flu can last about one to two weeks in pigs that survive. Swine influenza virus was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in the U.S. And has been recognized by pork producers and veterinarians to cause infections in pigs worldwide. In a number of instances, people have developed the swine flu infection when they are closely associated with pigs (for example, farmers, pork processors), and likewise, pig populations have occasionally been infected with the human flu infection. In most instances, the cross-species infections (swine virus to man; human flu virus to pigs) have remained in local areas and have not caused national or worldwide infections in either pigs or humans. Unfortunately, this cross-species situation with influenza viruses has had the potential to change. Investigators decided the 2009 so-called "swine flu" strain, first seen in Mexico, should be termed novel H1N1 flu since it was mainly found infecting people and exhibits two main surface antigens, H1 (hemagglutinin type 1) and N1 (neuraminidase type 1). The eight RNA strands from novel H1N1 flu have one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. How is swine flu transmitted? Is swine flu contagious? Swine influenza is transmitted from person to person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets containing virus from people sneezing or coughing; it is not transmitted by eating cooked pork products. The newest swine flu virus that has caused swine flu is influenza A H3N2v (commonly termed H3N2v) that began as an outbreak in 2011. The "v" in the name means the virus is a variant that normally infects only pigs but has begun to infect humans. There have been small outbreaks of H1N1 influenza since the pandemic; a recent one is in India where at least three people have died. Quick Guide Common Respiratory Illnesses Common Respiratory Illnesses What to Do if You Think You Have H1N1 Swine Flu Virus If you've got fever, cough, or one of the other symptoms of the flu, you may be wondering if you have contracted the H1N1 swine flu virus. The reality is that it isn't possible to know unless specialized testing is ordered, and for uncomplicated cases of the flu in non-hospitalized patients, routine testing for the H1N1 virus is not being carried out. Learn when to seek medical care for H1N1 swine flu symptoms » What is the incubation period for swine flu? The incubation period for swine flu is about one to four days, with the average being two days; in some people, the incubation period may be as long as about seven days in adults and children. What is the contagious period for swine flu? The contagious period for swine influenza in adults usually begins one day before symptoms develop in an adult and it lasts about five to seven days after the person becomes sick. However, people with weakened immune systems and children may be contagious for a longer period of time (for example, about 10 to 14 days). How long does the swine flu last? In uncomplicated infections, swine flu typically begins to resolve after three to seven days, but the malaise and cough can persist two weeks or more in some patients. Severe swine flu may require hospitalization that increases the length of time of infection to about nine to 10 days. What causes swine flu? The cause of the 2009 swine flu was an influenza A virus type designated as H1N1. In 2011, a new swine flu virus was detected. The new strain was named influenza A (H3N2) v. Only a few people (mainly children) were first infected, but officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported increased numbers of people infected in the 2012-2013 flu season. Currently, there are not large numbers of people infected with H3N2v. Unfortunately, another virus termed H3N2 (note no "v" in its name) has been detected and caused flu, but this strain is different from H3N2v. In general, all of the influenza A viruses have a structure similar to the H1N1 virus; each type has a somewhat different H and/or N structure. Why is swine flu now infecting humans? Many researchers now consider that two main series of events can lead to swine flu (and also avian or bird flu) becoming a major cause for influenza illness in humans. First, the influenza viruses (types A, B, C) are enveloped RNA viruses with a segmented genome; this means the viral RNA genetic code is not a single strand of RNA but exists as eight different RNA segments in the influenza viruses. A human (or bird) influenza virus can infect a pig respiratory cell at the same time as a swine influenza virus; some of the replicating RNA strands from the human virus can get mistakenly enclosed inside the enveloped swine influenza virus. For example, one cell could contain eight swine flu and eight human flu RNA segments. The total number of RNA types in one cell would be 16; four swine and four human flu RNA segments could be incorporated into one particle, making a viable eight RNA-segmented flu virus from the 16 available segment types. Various combinations of RNA segments can result in a new subtype of virus (this process is known as antigenic shift) that may have the ability to preferentially infect humans but still show characteristics unique to the swine influenza virus (see Figure 1). It is even possible to include RNA strands from birds, swine, and human influenza viruses into one virus if a single cell becomes infected with all three types of influenza (for example, two bird flu, three swine flu, and three human flu RNA segments to produce a viable eight-segment new type of flu viral genome). Formation of a new viral type is considered to be antigenic shift; small changes within an individual RNA segment in flu viruses are termed antigenic drift (see figure 1) and result in minor changes in the virus. However, these small genetic changes can accumulate over time to produce enough minor changes that cumulatively alter the virus' makeup over time (usually years). Second, pigs can play a unique role as an intermediary host to new flu types because pig respiratory cells can be infected directly with bird, human, and other mammalian flu viruses. Consequently, pig respiratory cells are able to be infected with many types of flu and can function as a "mixing pot" for flu RNA segments (see figure 1). Bird flu viruses, which usually infect the gastrointestinal cells of many bird species, are shed in bird feces. Pigs can pick these viruses up from the environment, and this seems to be the major way that bird flu virus RNA segments enter the mammalian flu virus population. Figure 1 shows this process in H1N1, but the figure represents the genetic process for all flu viruses, including human, swine, and avian strains. Picture of antigenic shift and antigenic drift in swine flu (H1N1). Figure 1. What are swine flu symptoms and signs? Readers Comments 7 Share Your Story Symptoms of swine flu are similar to most influenza infections: fever (100 F or greater), cough (usually dry), nasal secretions, fatigue, and headache, with fatigue being reported in most infected individuals. Some patients may also get a sore throat, rash, body (muscle) aches or pains, headaches, chills, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In Mexico, many of the initial patients infected with H1N1 influenza were young adults, which made some investigators speculate that a strong immune response, as seen in young people, may cause some collateral tissue damage. The incubation period from exposure to first symptoms is about one to four days, with an average of two days. The symptoms last about one to two weeks and can last longer if the person has a severe infection. Some patients develop severe respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath, and need respiratory support (such as a ventilator to breathe for the patient). Patients can get pneumonia (bacterial secondary infection) if the viral infection persists, and some can develop seizures. Death often occurs from secondary bacterial infection of the lungs; appropriate antibiotics need to be used in these patients. The usual mortality (death) rate for typical influenza A is about 0.1%, while the 1918 "Spanish flu" epidemic had an estimated mortality rate ranging from 2%-20%. Swine (H1N1) flu in Mexico had about 160 deaths and about 2,500 confirmed cases, which would correspond to a mortality rate of about 6%, but these initial data were revised and the mortality rate worldwide was estimated to be much lower. Fortunately, the mortality rate of H1N1 remained low and similar to that of the conventional flu (average conventional flu mortality rate is about 36,000 per year; projected H1N1 flu mortality rate was 90,000 per year in the U.S. As determined by the president's advisory committee, but it never approached that high number). Fortunately, although H1N1 developed into a pandemic (worldwide) flu strain, the mortality rate in the U.S. And many other countries only approximated the usual numbers of flu deaths worldwide. Speculation about why the mortality rate remained much lower than predicted includes increased public awareness and action that produced an increase in hygiene (especially hand washing), a fairly rapid development of a new vaccine, and patient self-isolation if symptoms developed. What tests do health care professionals use to diagnose swine flu? Swine flu is presumptively diagnosed clinically by the patient's history of association with people known to have the disease and their symptoms listed above. Usually, a quick test (for example, nasopharyngeal swab sample) is done to see if the patient is infected with influenza A or B virus. Most of the tests can distinguish between A and B types. The test can be negative (no flu infection) or positive for type A and B. If the test is positive for type B, the flu is not likely to be swine flu. If it is positive for type A, the person could have a conventional flu strain or swine flu. However, the accuracy of these tests has been challenged, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not completed their comparative studies of these tests. However, a new test developed by the CDC and a commercial company reportedly can detect H1N1 reliably in about one hour; the test was formerly only available to the military. In 2010, the FDA approved a commercially available test that could detect H1N1 within four hours. Most of these rapid tests are based on PCR technology. Swine flu is definitively diagnosed by identifying the particular antigens (surface proteins) associated with the virus type. In general, this test is done in a specialized laboratory and is not done by many doctors' offices or hospital laboratories. However, doctors' offices are able to send specimens to specialized laboratories if necessary. Because of the large number of novel H1N1 swine flu cases that occurred in the 2009-2010 flu season (the vast majority of flu cases [about 95%-99%] were due to novel H1N1 flu viruses), the CDC recommended only hospitalized patients' flu virus strains be sent to reference labs to be identified. H3N2v flu strains and other flu virus strains are diagnosed by similar methods. What types of health care professionals treat swine flu? Almost all uncomplicated patients with swine flu can be treated at home or by the patient's pediatrician, primary-care provider, or emergency-medicine doctor. For more complicated and/or severe swine flu infections, specialists such as critical-care specialists, lung specialists (pulmonologists), and infectious-disease specialists may be consulted. What is the treatment for swine flu? Readers Comments 1 Share Your Story The best treatment for influenza infections in humans is prevention by vaccination. Work by several laboratories has produced vaccines. The first H1N1 vaccine released in early October 2009 was a nasal spray vaccine that was approved for use in healthy individuals ages 2-49. The injectable vaccine, made from killed H1N1, became available in the second week of Oct. 2009. This vaccine was approved for use in ages 6 months to the elderly, including pregnant females. Both of these vaccines were approved by the CDC only after they had conducted clinical trials to prove that the vaccines were safe and effective. A new influenza vaccine preparation is the intradermal (trivalent) vaccine is available; it works like the shot except the administration is less painful. It is approved for ages 18-64 years. Almost all vaccines have some side effects. Common side effects of H1N1 vaccines (alone or in combination with other flu viral strains) are typical of flu vaccines used over many years and are as follows: Flu shot: Soreness, redness, minor swelling at the shot site, muscle aches, low-grade fever, and nausea do not usually last more than about 24 hours. Nasal spray: runny nose, low-grade fever, vomiting, headache, wheezing, cough, and sore throat Intradermal shot: redness, swelling, pain, headache, muscle aches, fatigue The flu shot (vaccine) is made from killed virus particles so a person cannot get the flu from a flu shot. However, the nasal spray vaccine contains live virus that have been altered to hinder its ability to replicate in human tissue. People with a suppressed immune system should not get vaccinated with the nasal spray. Also, most vaccines that contain flu viral particles are cultivated in eggs, so individuals with an allergy to eggs should not get the vaccine unless tested and advised by their doctor that they are cleared to obtain it. Like all vaccines, rare events may occur in some rare cases (for example, swelling, weakness, or shortness of breath). About one person in a million who gets the vaccine may develop a neurological problem termed Guillain-Barré syndrome, which can cause weakness or paralysis, difficulty breathing, bladder and/or bowel problems, and other nerve problems. If any symptoms like these develop, see a physician immediately. Two antiviral agents have been reported to help prevent or reduce the effects of swine flu. They are zanamivir (Relenza) and oseltamivir (Tamiflu), both of which are also used to prevent or reduce influenza A and B symptoms. These drugs should not be used indiscriminately, because viral resistance to them can and has occurred. Also, they are not recommended if the flu symptoms already have been present for 48 hours or more, although hospitalized patients may still be treated past the 48-hour guideline. Severe infections in some patients may require additional supportive measures such as ventilation support and treatment of other infections like pneumonia that can occur in patients with a severe flu infection. The CDC has suggested in their guidelines that pregnant females can be treated with the two antiviral agents. Some researchers suggest the data on Tamiflu and Relenza is not correct and suggest the antivirals are not effective. On Dec. 22, 2014, the FDA approved the first new anti-influenza drug (for H1N1 and other influenza virus types) in 15 years, peramivir injection (Rapivab). It is approved for use in the following settings: Diarrhea, skin infections, hallucinations, and/or altered behavior may occur as side effects of this drug. Adult patients for whom therapy with an intravenous (IV) medication is clinically appropriate, based upon one or more of the following reasons: The patient is not responding to either oral or inhaled antiviral therapy, or drug delivery by a route other than IV is not expected to be dependable or is not feasible, or the physician decides that IV therapy is appropriate due to other circumstances. Pediatric patients for whom an intravenous medication clinically appropriate because: The patient is not responding to either oral or inhaled antiviral therapy, or drug delivery by a route other than IV is not expected to be dependable or is not feasible. What is the history of swine flu in humans? In 1976, there was an outbreak of swine flu at Fort Dix. This virus was not the same as the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, but it was similar insofar as it was an influenza A virus that had similarities to the swine flu virus. There was one death at Fort Dix. The government decided to produce a vaccine against this virus, but the vaccine was associated with rare instances of neurological complications (Guillain-Barré syndrome) and was discontinued. Some individuals speculate that formalin, used to inactivate the virus, may have played a role in the development of this complication in 1976. One of the reasons it takes a few months to develop a new vaccine is to test the vaccine for safety to avoid the complications seen in the 1976 vaccine. Individuals with active infections or diseases of the nervous system are also not recommended to get flu vaccines. Early in the spring of 2009, H1N1 flu virus was first detected in Mexico, causing some deaths among a "younger" population. It began increasing during the summer 2009 and rapidly circulated to the U.S. And to Europe and eventually worldwide. The WHO declared it first fit their criteria for an epidemic and then, in June 2009, the WHO declared the first flu pandemic in 41 years. There was a worldwide concern and people began to improve in hand washing and other prevention methods while they awaited vaccine development. The trivalent vaccine made for the 2009-2010 flu season offered virtually no protection from H1N1. New vaccines were developed (both live and killed virus) and started to become available in Sept. 2009-Oct. 2009. The CDC established a protocol guideline for those who should get the vaccine first. By late December to January, a vaccine against H1N1 was available in moderate supply worldwide. The numbers of infected patients began to recede and the pandemic ended. However, a strain of H1N1 was incorporated into the yearly trivalent vaccine for the 2010-2011 flu season because the virus was present in the world populations. As stated in the first section of this article, a new strain of swine flu, (H3N2) v, was detected in 2011; it has not affected any large numbers of people in the current flu season. However, another antigenically distinct virus with the same H and N components (termed H3N2 (note no "v") has caused flu in humans; viral antigens were incorporated into the 2013-2014 seasonal flu shots and nasal spray vaccines. In India in 2015-2016, a large outbreak of swine flu has been ongoing; there are some researchers who claim the strain of virus has mutated slightly and has become able to cause more severe infections. What are the risk factors for swine flu? Readers Comments 32 Share Your Story Vaccination to prevent influenza is particularly important for people who are at increased risk for severe complications from influenza or at higher risk for influenza-related doctor or hospital visits. When vaccine supply is limited, vaccination efforts should focus on delivering vaccination to the following people since these populations have a higher risk for H1N1 and some other viral infections according to the CDC: All children 6 months to 4 years (59 months) of age All people 50 years of age and older Adults and children who have chronic pulmonary (including asthma) or cardiovascular (except isolated hypertension), renal, hepatic, neurological, hematologic, or metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus) People who have immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications or by HIV) Women who are or will be pregnant during the influenza season Children and adolescents (6 months to 18 years of age) who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy and who might be at risk for experiencing Reye's syndrome after influenza virus infection Residents of nursing homes and other long-term-care facilities American Indians/Alaska natives People who are morbidly obese (BMI ≥40) Health care professionals (doctors, nurses, health care personnel treating patients) Household contacts and caregivers of children under 5 years of age and adults 50 years of age and older, with particular emphasis on vaccinating contacts of children less than 6 months age Household contacts and caregivers of people with medical conditions that put them at higher risk for severe complications from influenza. The CDC recommends for the 2014-2015 flu season that everyone 6 months old and older should get a flu shot to prevent or reduce the chance of getting the flu. The best way to prevent novel H1N1 swine flu is vaccination.
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What are the symptoms of malaria and what precaution we should take to prevent it.

What are the symptoms of malaria and what precaution we should take to prevent it.
note common symptom of Malaria high fever. shaking chills profuse sweating. headache nausea/Vomiting diarrhea. we can prevent Malaria by prevention mosquito bite A bite from a parasite-infected mosquito causes malaria. Reducing exposure to mosquitoes Spraying your home. Treating your home's walls with insecticide can help kill adult mosquitoes that come inside. Sleeping under a net. Covering your skin. During active mosquito times, usually from dusk to dawn, wear pants and long-sleeved shirts.
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