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Ms. Sukanya Biswas - Psychologist, Pune

Ms. Sukanya Biswas

90 (106 ratings)
Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practi...

Psychologist, Pune

5 Years Experience  ·  700 at clinic  ·  ₹250 online
Ms. Sukanya Biswas 90% (106 ratings) Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Beha... Psychologist, Pune
5 Years Experience  ·  700 at clinic  ·  ₹250 online
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Ms. Sukanya Biswas
With more than 24 years in the field of Nephrology, Dr D. K. Agarwal is a veteran serving many kidney patients from Apollo hospitals, Delhi. He specializes in renal transplant, haemodialysis, CAPD and various types of Kidney problems and diseases. He also treats critical kidney patients with emergency management. Dr. D.K. Agarwal has conducted more than 2,000 kidney transplantations, both cadaveric and live donor. He has also performed many renal transplantations using new techniques for incompatible renal cases and even swapping. Dr. D.K. Agarwal was a recognized gold medallist during both his graduation and post-graduation. He also holds a DM and DNB in Nephrology. He is a Fellow of the Indian society of Nephrology, Indian College of Physicians and the prestigious IMA Academy of Medical Specialities (FIMAAMS), in Nephrology (FIMAAMS). He is also a life member of many medical associations in India. Dr. Agarwal has many publications and articles to his credit where he provides suggestions and advice to kidney patients about diet and lifestyle. Dr. D.K. Agarwal has served in many reputed institutions across India and abroad including Nizam’s Institute of Medical Sciences in Hyderabad and Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow and University of Missouri School of Medicine's Nephrolgy Division, located in Columbia, USA. He currently works as a Senior Nephrologist for Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Delhi. Dr. Agarwal’s experience in Nephrology includes treating diabetic and hypertensive patients with kidney problems. He is loved and admired by his patients for his knowledge and ability to treat patients with advanced kidney problems.

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Education
Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner - Endorphins - 2015
Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner - American Board of NLP - 2015
Masters in Clinical Psychology - Pune University - 2012
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Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling - Jnana Probhodini - 2012
Past Experience
Psychologist at Mediexpress
Psychologist at Medcliniq
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Awards and Recognitions
Akolkar Sidenure Prize for securing Qualities value-consciousness and constructive leadership
Professional Memberships
life member of Indian Clinical Psychological Association
Member of American Psychological Association

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Medixpress - Salunkhe Vihar

101/102 Girme Towers next to HDFC Bank Opp. Kotak Mahindra Bank Salunkhe Vihar RoadPune Get Directions
  4.5  (106 ratings)
700 at clinic
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"Very helpful" 8 reviews "Practical" 2 reviews "knowledgeable" 3 reviews "Sensible" 3 reviews "Well-reasoned" 2 reviews "Caring" 1 review "Thorough" 1 review "Professional" 2 reviews

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Eating Disorders And Its Symptoms!

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Eating Disorders And Its Symptoms!

There is a commonly held view that eating disorders are a lifestyle choice. Eating disorders are actually serious and often fatal illnesses that cause severe disturbances to a person's eating behaviors. Obsessions with food, body weight, and shape may also signal an eating disorder. 

Signs and Symptoms of Common Eating Disorders are discussed below:

Anorexia Nervosa:

People with anorexia nervosa may see themselves as overweight, even when they are dangerously underweight. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, severely restrict the amount of food they eat, and eat very small quantities of only certain foods. Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Extremely restricted eating
  • Extreme thinness (emaciation)
  • A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight

Other symptoms may develop over time, including:

  • Thinning of the bones (osteopenia or osteoporosis)
  • Mild anemia and muscle wasting and weakness
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Dry and yellowish skin
  • Growth of fine hair all over the body (lanugo)
  • Severe constipation
  • Low blood pressure, slowed breathing and pulse
  • Damage to the structure and function of the heart
  • Brain damage
  • Multiorgan failure
  • Drop in internal body temperature, causing a person to feel cold all the time
  • Lethargy, sluggishness, or feeling tired all the time
  • Infertility

Bulimia Nervosa:

People with bulimia nervosa have recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food and feeling a lack of control over these episodes. This binge-eating is followed by behavior that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviors. People with bulimia nervosa usually maintain what is considered a healthy or relatively normal weight.

Symptoms:

  • Chronically inflamed and sore throat
  • Swollen salivary glands in the neck and jaw area
  • Worn tooth enamel and increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth as a result of exposure to stomach acid
  • Acid reflux disorder and other gastrointestinal problems
  • Intestinal distress and irritation from laxative abuse
  • Severe dehydration from purging of fluids
  • Electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium and other minerals) which can lead to stroke or heart attack

Binge-eating Disorder:

People with binge-eating disorder lose control over his or her eating. Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. Binge-eating disorder is the most common eating disorder.

Symptoms:

  • Eating unusually large amounts of food in a specific amount of time
  • Eating even when you're full or not hungry
  • Eating fast during binge episodes
  • Eating until you're uncomfortably full
  • Eating alone or in secret to avoid embarrassment
  • Feeling distressed, ashamed, or guilty about your eating
  • Frequently dieting, possibly without weight loss

Unspecified Eating Disorder:

  • This happens when the behavior do not meet the criteria for any food or eating problems but still pose significant threat and problems.
  • This also happens the clinician is not able to assess whether an individual is affected by a certain disorder.

Treatment:

Treatment is available. Recovery is possible.

Eating disorders are serious health conditions that can be both physically and emotionally destructive. People with eating disorders need to seek professional help. Early diagnosis and intervention may enhance recovery. Eating disorders can become chronic, debilitating, and even life-threatening conditions.

When you begin to notice that disordered eating habits are affecting your life, your happiness, and your ability to concentrate, it is important that you talk to somebody about what you are going through.

The most effective and long-lasting treatment for an eating disorder is some form of psychotherapy or psychological counseling, coupled with careful attention to medical and nutritional needs. Ideally, this treatment should be tailored to the individual and will vary according to both the severities of the disorder and the patient's particular problems, needs, and strengths.

2701 people found this helpful

3 Ways To Manage Chronic Depression!

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
3 Ways To Manage Chronic Depression!

Are you suffering from extreme depression? Does your depression episode continues for a long time and makes you feel too tired to get out of bed? Chronic depression is capable of turning your life upside down, causing turmoil with all your activities, thereby, spoiling your regular life totally. At times, a person can get so drained by depression that getting out of bed seems impossible because of fatigue. It is quite difficult to deal with such situations.

Here are some important tips on how to overcome your chronic depression and get out of bed.

  1. Be depressed upright: It is likely to be driven by the voices in your head during your depression. You should respond by replying to the voices that you are depressed, but you are going to be depressed outside. This is important, as activity and depression do not go well together. You should try to stop your thinking totally and put yourself in an automatic mode. Preparing to deal with thoughts from before is beneficial. When your body is in motion, it is easier to deal with the thoughts.
  2. Try to make it to the shower: When you do not feel like leaving your bed at all, you should try making it to the shower somehow. Taking a shower makes you a bit relaxed and diverted and you can expect relief from your depressive episode. This is an effective way to get yourself up and running from bed, instead of isolating yourself under the blanket. Taking a shower might bring you some hope and encourage you to step out of bed and do something productive. Even if you decided to be in bed all day strictly, a refreshing shower is likely to change your mind.
  3. Bribe yourself: You can try bribing yourself as a reason for getting out of bed. You can remind yourself how good you will feel after having a cup of hot coffee, or how nice it would feel to listen to a certain song while going to work.

It is important to give yourself a purpose or reason to get out of bed. Many people believe that they might feel like leaving the bed in spite of being heavily depressed, if they had a worthy purpose. It is very important for you to get involved in something. You might hate a job, or hate working, but it will give you a reason to divert from your depressive thoughts. If you wish to discuss any specific problem, you can consult a psychologist.

2677 people found this helpful

Facebook Vs Alcohol - Which Is More Addictive?

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Facebook Vs Alcohol - Which Is More Addictive?

You might be feeling that spending time on any social media network is a simple way to pass time and is a common habit. But a recent study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business says that social networking sites can be more addictive, than alcohol. The desire to consume alcohol can be controlled and turned down, but the desire to check Facebook is simply uncontrollable for most people, and it’s a serious addiction.

About the study
The ground breaking study was done on 250 people in and around Germany aged between 18 and 85 years of age. They were sent messages at specific intervals to report their desires and cravings. It is found that most people had the desire to sleep and have sex during the day that they were able to control. But the desire for checking Facebook was much higher.

Reasons for Facebook addiction

  1. One of the major reasons is that availability of Facebook is much easier and higher than alcohol availability.
  2. Also, it is thought that the cost of checking Facebook is much less than consuming some amount of alcohol on a regular basis.
  3. Even if a man wants to resist his desire, but due to easy availability and lesser cost, he is prone to use it again and again.
  4. Alcohol consumption is prohibited in public and during office hours in many countries. But checking Facebook updates have no restrictions. People can check it whenever they feel the desire.
  5. The most shocking part is the urges drove the people to such an extent, that they couldn’t even resist themselves even if they wanted to do so.

Effects of Facebook addiction

  1. Drainage of time: No matter how good we feel while checking Facebook updates, can you deny that it’s simply a waste of time?
  2. Self esteem reduced: When you see your peers enjoying their life with flying colors, no wonder you will feel depressed. But we are reluctant to believe this fact, that nobody shows his tragic part of life on Facebook. So, whom you think is the happiest person in the world, may be the saddest and is drowned in his own miseries.

Remedy of this so called addiction
The study says that when we are much worn out, we are unable to control our desire and our will power is depleted.

So, if you find yourself posting your status on Facebook at the midnight instead of sleeping, then it is high time you should try to come out of this addiction and give yourself a better life and health. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a psychologist.

4545 people found this helpful

Stress - 5 Ways To Deal With Its Wear & Tear!

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Stress - 5 Ways To Deal With Its Wear & Tear!

With today's lifestyle, it is almost impossible to avoid stress. Each person experiences stress in a different way and can tolerate different levels of stress. For some work is a source of stress while for others it could be strained relationships or financial trouble. Stress, if not dealt correctly can harm a person mentally, emotionally and physically. Stress can also make a person age faster. Hence. it becomes essential to understand how to deal with the wear and tear of stress.

  • Cut back on caffeine, alcohol and nicotine: Stress can fasten your heartbeat and lead to anxiousness and depression. Turning to nicotine, alcohol or any form of caffeinated drink may temporarily make you feel better but will worsen the situation in the long run. This is because all three of them are considered stimulants. Instead hydrate your body with plenty of water, fresh fruits juices and herbal teas.
  • Exercise: Regular exercise is beneficial for a healthy mind and body. Exercising give you some time to yourself and gives you a break from whatever may be triggering your stress. Stress also causes the release of hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol. This can make you jumpy and tense. However, by exercising these hormones can be put to use and your body can be brought back to a calmer state.
  • Talk to someone: Stress can lead to anxiety and depression. This can make you socially withdrawn and lead to even more stress. Hence, it is essential to find someone who you can open up to and share your thoughts and experience with. This will also help you make better decisions as stress can cloud your judgement.
  • Get a good night s sleep: Stress can affect your sleep cycles and make you either an insomniac or make you sleep excessively. In both cases, you wake up feeling tired and sans any energy to take on the next day. Give yourself a routine of going to bed and waking up at the same time every day to fight these effects of stress and to give your mind time to refresh itself. It will also help to avoid watching television or working on laptops or mobiles for an hour before going to bed.
  • Prioritize: Seeing a never ending to-do list is one of the most common stress triggers. In such situations, stress can make you unable to complete your tasks efficiently and you re left either feeling overworked or with an even longer to-do list for the next day. Hence, it is important to learn to prioritise tasks and get them done one at a time. Also, learn to say NO to people when you know you do not have the time to take on additional tasks. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a psychologist.
3339 people found this helpful

I am usually very unpredictable and easy going but lately I feel like sitting in front of my laptop and open my books and never get out of my room and listen to music all day and drown out other things in my life. What do you suggest I do? I think I have depression but I am not sure. So your opinion will really help thanks.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I am usually very unpredictable and easy going but lately I feel like sitting in front of my laptop and open my books...
Theses are few Symptoms of depression: Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness. A bleak outlook—nothing will ever get better and there’s nothing you can do to improve your situation. Loss of interest in daily activities. You don’t care anymore about former hobbies, pastimes, social activities, or sex. You’ve lost your ability to feel joy and pleasure. Appetite or weight changes. Significant weight loss or weight gain—a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month. Sleep changes. Either insomnia, especially waking in the early hours of the morning, or oversleeping. Anger or irritability. Feeling agitated, restless, or even violent. Your tolerance level is low, your temper short, and everything and everyone gets on your nerves. Loss of energy. Feeling fatigued, sluggish, and physically drained. Your whole body may feel heavy, and even small tasks are exhausting or take longer to complete. Self-loathing. Strong feelings of worthlessness or guilt. You harshly criticize yourself for perceived faults and mistakes. Reckless behavior. You engage in escapist behavior such as substance abuse, compulsive gambling, reckless driving, or dangerous sports. Concentration problems. Trouble focusing, making decisions, or remembering things. Unexplained aches and pains. An increase in physical complaints such as headaches, back pain, aching muscles, and stomach pain. Theses are the criteria for qualifying for depression A. Five (or more) of the following symptoms have been present during the same 2-week period and represent a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either (1) depressed mood or (2) loss of interest or pleasure. Note: Do not include symptoms that are clearly attributable to another medical condition. 1. Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, as indicated by either subjective report (e.g. Feels sad, empty, hopeless) or observation made by others (e.g. Appears tearful). (Note: In children and adolescents, can be irritable mood.) 2. Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day (as indicated by either subjective account or observation.) 3. Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g. A change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day. (Note: In children, consider failure to make expected weight gain.) 4. Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day. 5. Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down). 6. Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day. 7. Feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt (which may be delusional) nearly every day (not merely self-reproach or guilt about being sick). 8. Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or as observed by others). 9. Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide. B. The symptoms cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
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How can a spouse of an alcoholic husband recover and support him after his rehabilitation?

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
You can be there for your spouse – and help preserve your marriage – by taking the following steps: Educate yourself. Learn about the process of recovery and the risk factors for relapse, and work with your spouse on their relapse prevention plan. Try to understand your spouse’s journey into sobriety and the obstacles and personal torment they’ve faced. Open the lines of communication. Talk to your spouse about the kind of support they need, taking care not to sacrifice your own emotional, physical or mental health. Share your hopes and expectations so that you can work toward the same goals. In counseling, you’ll be able to practice new communication skills and work together to identify and manage feelings. Know that your relationship is going to change. Your spouse’s progress may be slow, or it may be surprisingly quick. They may meet new friends, excel at work and perhaps even outshine you. Allow your spouse some freedom to explore who they are without drugs or alcohol, knowing that a shift in responsibilities and power dynamics can bring greater happiness to your home. Know that you and/or your spouse may consider leaving the marriage. In the process of getting reacquainted, you may feel that you never knew or loved your spouse, or that you no longer have anything in common. The emotional ups and downs of recovery may place a great deal of stress on the relationship, and it can be difficult to repair the damage, particularly if legal or financial problems continue to impact the family. Counseling can help you reconnect and remember why you came together in the first place. Be patient. Even without drugs or alcohol, your spouse may not become the person you’ve always hoped they’d be – at least not quickly. It will take time for them to fulfill family responsibilities, and it may take time for you to be ready to put those responsibilities back in their hands. Work on forgiveness. Partners often have a lot of pain and anger built up after years of dealing with an addicted spouse. Those feelings are unquestionably valid, but holding on to them may prevent you from healing and moving forward. Avoid blame. Remember that addiction is a disease – not a moral failing or lack of willpower – and your spouse likely feels a great deal of shame and guilt for their past behaviors. Praise your spouse’s progress. Encourage them to go to 12-Step meetings and meet with their sponsor any time, even if it’s inconvenient. Prepare for setbacks. Even after completing drug rehab, your spouse may struggle on the path of addiction recovery. Hurdles can range from lying, manipulating and selfishness to full-blown relapse. Don’t take relapse personally. Your spouse’s recovery involves you, but it is really about them. If your spouse falls back into old patterns, continue to lend your support and get them back into drug rehab. Spend time getting to know each other again. You may not recognize the individual you’re living with, but chances are you’ll grow to like this person far more than the person they were under the influence of drugs or alcohol. For most couples with a spouse in addiction recovery, life doesn’t magically fall into place without a lot of hard work by both partners. Recovery can deepen the bonds of marriage, but only if you take care of yourself and each other. Although recovery may be your spouse’s number-one priority right now, there’s an important place for you in the process.
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I am 35 years old woman. I am having useless irrational thoughts and feel guilty. I understand my thoughts are irrational but still they repeatedly come. I am taking prolomet and stalopam10 .This problem is the last 3-4 Yrs. At the start I was very fearful and high pulse rate. Can I be cured.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I am 35 years old woman. I am having useless irrational thoughts and feel guilty. I understand my thoughts are irrati...
Identify your negative thoughts. Some might immediately spring to mind, but if you have trouble pinpointing them, consider journaling. Write down a sentence or two describing the negative thoughts whenever you have them. •Look for thoughts that make you feel sad or discouraged, such as: blaming or shaming yourself for things that are not your fault, interpreting simple mistakes as indicative of personal failings, or imagining small problems are bigger than they are ("making a mountain out of a molehill"). Stop the negative thought immediately. Once you've identified your negative thought, counteract it by saying something positive to yourself. For example, instead of saying, "I'm having a really bad morning, try saying something like, "This morning is rough, but my day will get better. Keep your mind on the positive. If you're struggling with this, keep this one trick in mind: never say something to yourself that you wouldn't say to someone else. Remind yourself to stay positive and it may just become a habit. Pay attention to your vocabulary. Do you find yourself frequently using absolute terms? For example, "I'll never be able to do this, or "I always mess this up. Absolute terms are often exaggerated and leave no room for explanation or understanding. •Your vocabulary includes what you speak out loud to others, as well as how you talk to yourself, whether verbally or mentally. Remove overly negative words from your vocabulary. Extreme terms like "terrible" and "disaster" shouldn't apply to minor annoyances and inconveniences. Toning down your language can help you put negative experiences into a healthier perspective. Replace these words with encouraging thoughts or praise. •When you do catch yourself using one of those words, immediately replace it in your thoughts with a less extreme term. "Terrible" can become "unfortunate" or "not as good as I had hoped. "Disaster" can become "inconvenience" or "challenge Turn the bad into good. Few situations are totally good or totally bad. Finding the good in an upsetting situation helps bad experiences seem less stark. If you find yourself starting to think a negative thought, immediately stop and consider a positive aspect. •For example: Imagine your computer stopped working, forcing you to replace an internal component. While inconvenient, the experience also gave you the opportunity to learn a new skill or reaffirm an existing skill. Start your day by thinking of 5 good things. They don't have to be lofty or ambitious things. They can be as simple as the smell of a good cup of coffee or the sound of your favorite song. Thinking of these things and saying them out loud means you start each day focusing on the positive. This creates an uplifting foundation for the rest of the day, making it more difficult for negativity to grow. •While you may feel silly verbalizing positive statements or affirmations, studies have shown that saying positive things out loud will actually make you more likely to believe what you're saying. This can make you happier and more focused if you're vocalizing positive thoughts. Enjoy your day. Though you may be busy, little things can keep your spirits high and give your mind fewer reasons to stray into negative habits. Don't take things so seriously. Allow yourself to relax, laugh, and smile. Take opportunities to socialize and surround yourself with supportive positive people. •If you find yourself feeling stressed, take a short break and think of something other than the source of your stress. Practice healthy habits. Negative thinking and stress both reinforce one another. While negative thinking can create stress, other unhealthy living habits can contribute to the problem as well. Make an effort to eat fresh, nutritious food whenever possible, exercise regularly, and get plenty of sleep. •You may find that exercise is actually a good way to distract your mind from negative thoughts. •Avoid smoking, excessive drinking, or any other substance habits that put strain on your body. Control your environment. You are not helpless to your thoughts. If you're unhappy with something, change it. Playing music, layering clothes so you are never too warm or too cold, and adjusting lighting are just a few ways you can empower yourself against the feelings of helplessness associated with stress. •After making the changes, congratulate yourself on the improvement to your mood. Actively adjusting your mindset will make it easier to remove negative thoughts in the first place. Decompress and relax in the evening. Find a quiet, comfortable place and set aside time to relax. Mentally review your day and identify five positive things you experienced. Say each positive thing out loud or write them down in a journal. •You might also consider writing down things you're thankful for. In doing so, you're more likely to begin seeing the positive in things.
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Is Your Loved One Suffering From Depression? Know How to Handle Them!

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Is Your Loved One Suffering From Depression? Know How to Handle Them!

Depression is such an ailment that may be intensely distressing and may lead to severe damage to the afflicted person and their close ones, if left without proper care and treatment. So if you are in charge of caring for patients affected with chronic depression, then it may seem challenging as well as equally rewarding. You will feel challenged when you're trying to figure out a possible solution to help the patient. Each patient is a distinct individual with varying needs contrary to the patients affected with diabetes or cardiac disorders where the treatments are properly schemed and structured.

Caring for yourself is also important-

When you are trying to deal with patients affected with depression, you will first have to properly recognize depression and anxiety. When someone you love is affected with depression, you will try your level best to help that person come out of the situation. However, note that it is also important to take care of your own mental as well as physical health. Because when you are trying to help a person come out of depression, it is likely that you too would face similar psychological distress. A recent study reported that caregivers of depressed people with bipolar disorder and severe depressive problems were more susceptible to psychological troubles than care providers of other healthcare needs like diabetes or cancer among general population. So it is really imperative to look after yourself as well.

Sticking to a well-regulated treatment plan-

Though social support is significant, it alone cannot help in suppressing depression. If you know a person encountering pangs of depression, advise him or her to seek professional assistance. Depression is such a clinical condition that requires to be dealt with medication, therapy or a balanced combination of both. You will have to make them understand that you care about them, but you alone cannot succeed in healing that person without proper medical guidance. Encourage such people to closely follow a physician’s advice and take proper medicines as recommended by the healthcare provider.

Insisting on following healthy habits-

You will have to try to encourage the patients in regulating their energies into doing something positive for both mind and body. This can be aptly done through exercise, which helps in lowering the risk of anxiety as well as depression with regular practice. This, along with the intake of a healthy balanced diet would also help them to recover faster.

While doing your bit to aid a person come out of depression, you should also take him or her to a responsive psychologist who can recommend faster methods of getting rid of depression permanently.

2702 people found this helpful

Panic Disorder- How To Control It

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Panic Disorder- How To Control It

A panic attack is an intense and sudden feeling of fear that may lead the person to lose control and fear that he is dying. The intensity of the attack normally hits for around ten minutes though the symptoms may linger on after that. It normally occurs without prior signals and is typically unrelated to any of the underlying health troubles.

Ways to Control Panic Attack Symptoms-

If you are experiencing signs of panic attacks, then it is imperative to undergo proper medical treatment to find out any deeper medical problem related to these symptoms. If there is no definite cause, which is required to be treated, then there are various ways of controlling the panic attacks.

  1. Proper education: If panic attacks are left untreated for a long time, then it may lead to panic disorder, which includes frequent and recurrent panic attacks within a short span. So, it is important to have proper knowledge for combating panic disorders. You will have to understand how the fear centre of the brain works in order to recognise what panic disorder is. It is imperative to understand that the signs of panic disorder have no connection with any severe illness.

  2. Calm breathing: When a person is hit with a panic disorder, it is natural to take short, shallow breaths. You will have to take control of your breath and try to create a slow stream of air within and breathe it out, which will prevent hyperventilation and an accumulation of carbon-dioxide in the blood. It is recommended to practice slow breathing in a normal state of mind, so that you have a good hold over the technique which would come in handy when a panic attack occurs. You will have to breathe in for five seconds and hold the breath for one second before you exhale it out, spanning through four seconds. Repeat the process several times until you start experiencing a soothing feel.

  3. Muscle relaxation: Then you must try to learn how to relax the body by tensing and then relaxing different muscles, which will reduce the overall anxiety and stress levels causing panic attacks. You can start working on the muscles of your feet and then slowly move on to the forehead. You will have to tighten each muscle group while taking a deep breath, hold it for a few moments and release it while breathing out.

In case you think you are suffering from a panic disorder, it is imperative to waste no time and talk to a psychologist without further delay.

2513 people found this helpful

I fear dogs a lot. The very sight of it makes me afraid. I am walking and the dog is sitting on the edge those are quite anxious moments. What should I do? Dogs habit of smelling feels me that I should run (which I always do and luckily I escapes. Please help.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I fear dogs a lot. The very sight of it makes me afraid. I am walking and the dog is sitting on the edge those are qu...
Determining the Extent of Your Fear Analyze your symptoms. Specific phobias, including cynophobia (the fear of dogs), may include some of the following symptoms. Do you need to be in the presence of a dog, or can a photo or story of a dog trigger your symptoms? And, is it the dog itself that causes the fear, or something the dog is doing? For example, some people are fearful of barking, but are okay if a dog is silent. •Feeling an imminent sense of danger. •Feeling the need to escape or flee. •Heart racing, sweating, trembling or shaking, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea, dizziness, or chills. •Feeling like what is happening is unreal. •Feeling like you’re losing control or going crazy. •Feeling like you might die. Determine if you change your life because of your fear. Unfortunately fears can be so severe that we feel the best way to make them go away is to avoid them completely. While a fear of flying, for example, may be quite easy to avoid by simply never flying, dogs are another story. Ask yourself if you do the following things in order to avoid being around dogs. If you do, there’s a good chance you have cynophobia. •Do you avoid hanging out with specific people because they have a dog? •Do you change your route specifically to avoid a house or neighborhood that has a dog? •Do you avoid speaking to certain people because they talk about their dogs? Understand there is a way to overcome this fear. While it is possible to overcome your fear of dogs, keep in mind that you need to be patient. It won’t go away immediately, it will take work on your part. You may want to consider seeking professional help from a therapist who can walk you through the process of overcoming your fear. Consider writing about your fear in a journal. Write down specific past memories that you have about dogs, and how you felt during those experiences. Learn relaxation and meditation techniques to help keep your calm and help control your anxiety. Break your fear into smaller sections to overcome; don’t think you need to tackle the whole thing all in one go. Have faith in yourself that you will get over your fear of dogs. And accept any mistakes you make along the way. Conducting Cognitive Restructuring Understand what cognitive restructuring is. Many phobias, including cynophobia, are based on how your brain comprehends a specific situation, rather than the actual situation itself. For example, you’re not likely afraid of the actual dog in front of you, but rather, you’re brain is interpreting the dog as being a threat which is then causing you to be fearful. Cognitive restructuring helps you to identify these thoughts, understand that they are irrational, and slowly help you to rethink (or reframe) your thoughts about a specific situation (i.e. Dogs). It is important to go into cognitive restructuring with an open and willing mind. You need to accept the fact that your fear is probably not based on rational thought, and as such, means that you can train yourself to think differently. If you go into this type of treatment pessimistically or with the belief that you’re being completely reasonable in your fears, you will make the process much harder to overcome. Think about events that trigger your fearful thoughts. The first step to overcoming your fear is to identify what is causing the fear in the first place. This may include thinking and talking about your past experiences with dogs, and trying to figure out what may have started the phobia in the first place. It may also include narrowing down the exact trigger that causes your fear. Is it dogs in general that cause you to be fearful, or do you become fearful when a dog does something specific (i.e. Growls, barks, jumps up, runs, etc.). Analyze your existing beliefs about your trigger events. Once you have a solid understanding of the specific events that trigger your phobia, you need to evaluate what you are thinking when this fear occurs. What are you telling yourself? How are you interpreting the trigger event in your thoughts? What are your specific beliefs about that event the moment it is happening? Continue writing your memories and thoughts in your journal. At this point start recording the reasons why you think the events triggered your fear. Write down as many of your beliefs as you can remember. Analyze your beliefs and thoughts to determine if they include any of the following: •All or Nothing — do you view ALL dogs as bad, no matter what? Or do you categorize dogs differently depending on some type of feature? E.g. ”I can’t be friends with anyone who has a dog.” •Should, Must, Ought — do you see a dog and automatically assume you have to be afraid of it? Do you feel like you have no other choice in the matter? E.g. ”My mom said I should never trust a dog.” •Overgeneralizing — have you tried to overcome your fear before and weren’t able to, and now you assume you’ll never be able to overcome your fear of dogs? E.g. ”I tried to be near dogs before and it didn’t work. I have no choice but to be afraid of dogs.” •Mental Filter — do you automatically draw conclusions about dogs based only on one or two previous experiences with dogs? E.g. “That dog attacked me when I was 3, all dogs are bad and will attack people if they get the chance.” •Discounting the Positive — do you ignore something good that happened because you can’t believe it’ll happen again? E.g. ”Sure, I was able to sit beside that one dog, but he was old and sick and didn’t look like he could walk, let alone attack me.” •Jumping to Conclusions — do you see or hear a dog and automatically draw a conclusion about what’s going to happen? E.g. ”That’s a pit bull, they’re awful and nasty dogs that can’t be trained properly.” Look at the feelings and behaviours that result from your beliefs. At this point you should have a better understanding of what triggers your fear of dogs, and the thoughts and beliefs you have about dogs when that trigger happens. Now it’s time to analyze how these thoughts and beliefs actually make your feel and behave. In other words, what are the consequences of your fear? What is the fear ‘making’ you do? Continue writing in your journal. At this stage you’ll want to include your reactions (both internally and externally) to the events that triggered your fear, and the beliefs that contributed to that fear. Examples of reactions might be: •You were walking down your street and encountered a dog in the yard of a specific home. Afterwards you never walked down that street again. •Your neighbour has a dog that they let into the backyard to play, so you never go in your own backyard in case your neighbour’s dog is outside. •You refuse to go to a friend’s house because they got a dog, and you can’t hang out with them if they bring the dog along. Investigate if evidence exists to back-up your beliefs. You should now be at the point where you’ve analyzed what triggers your fear, why your fear is triggered, and how you react to that fear. Now it’s time to analyze if there’s any actual proof to back-up the reasons why you’re fearful of dogs. Think of this part of the process as you needing to be able to prove to your therapist (or yourself) that your fears are perfectly rational. Use your journal to write down each of your beliefs and the associated evidence you have as to why that belief is reasonable and rational. If you’re a really logical person, can you find any scientific proof to back up your beliefs? For example, you have the belief that all dogs are going to attack you no matter what. Why do you think this is true? Have you been attacked by every single dog you’ve ever encountered? Does everyone else get attacked by every dog they encounter? Why would people own dogs as pets if they were constantly attacked? Develop a rational explanation for the trigger event. At this point you have tried to prove your fear of dogs is perfectly reasonable and found that you can’t find any evidence to back-up your beliefs. In fact, you’ve probably found evidence of the complete opposite. You now need to think about the beliefs that are causing your fear and work with your therapist to develop rational explanations for your beliefs. These rational explanations will start to make sense, and make you realize that your resulting fear doesn’t make sense. While this may sound easy, this is going to be the hardest step in your process to overcome your fear of dogs. Our beliefs can be entrenched in our minds so deeply that it can take some time (and convincing) that they make no sense. After all, your irrational beliefs may have helped you avoid bad situations, so what’s wrong with them? For example, you have a belief that all dogs attack. You weren’t able to find any evidence to back up that belief, so why do you have it? Maybe your belief is based on the fact that you saw a movie when you were 7 (that you shouldn’t have watched) that had dogs attacking and killing people. After you watched that movie you started to fear dogs based on the assumption that the movie was 100% accurate. In reality, it was just a movie, and there was no truth to it. And if you think about it, you’ve never actually seen a dog attack anyone. Move to the next step in your recovery. While you’ve come a long way at this point, you’re not finished. Even if you’re able to convince yourself that your fears have no rational explanation and there’s no good reason to feel the way you do, you’re not actually “cured. In a way you’ve completed the theoretical aspect of your therapy, now you have to complete the practical aspect of your therapy. At this stage you need to practice being around dogs. First, you need to learn how to relax when your fear or anxiety occurs so you don’t set yourself back. Second, you need to gradually expose yourself to dogs (in different ways) until you can feel relaxed when they’re around. Learning Relaxation Techniques Understand the different types of relaxation techniques. There are quite a few different types of relaxation techniques that you can learn to help with your fear and anxiety. They include, but are not limited to, the following: autogenic relaxation; progressive muscle relaxation; visualization; deep breathing; hypnosis; massage; meditation; tai chi; yoga; biofeedback; and music and art therapy. •Autogenic relaxation is a technique where you use visual images and body awareness, while repeating words or terms, to help relax and reduce muscle tension. •Progressive muscle relaxation is a technique where you tense and relax each muscle in your body in order to get a sense of what each one feels like in both a tense and relaxed state. •Visualization is a technique where you visualize specific settings that make you feel relaxed and calm (i.e. Forest, beach with waves, etc.). •Deep breathing is a technique where you purposely breathe deeply from your abdomen in order to release tension and reverse hyperventilation. •Biofeedback is a technique where you learn to control each of your body’s functions, like your heart rate or breathing. Practice deep breathing relaxation. When you’re anxious or afraid you may react by breathing too quickly and hyperventilating. Hyperventilating can intensify your feelings of anxiety and fear and make the situation worse. Breathing deeply can help you relax, reduce your tension, and make you feel less anxious. Follow these steps to relax using deep breathing: •Sit or stand somewhere where you’re comfortable and keep your back straight. Put one of your hands on your chest and put your other hand on your stomach. •Take one slow deep breath in through your nose while counting to four. The hand on your stomach will rise while the hand on your chest shouldn’t move very much. •Hold your breath while counting to seven. •Exhale through your mouth while you count to eight. Push out as much air as you can using your abdominal muscles. This means the hand on your stomach should move downwards, and the hand on your chest shouldn’t move very much. •Repeat these steps until you feel calmer and relaxed. Perform progressive muscle relaxation. Anxious people also tend to be tense, even when they think they’re relaxed. Progressive muscle relaxation can help you distinguish between relaxed and tense muscles so you actually know what it feels like to relax. Practice the following steps twice a day until you really feel it working. •Find a quiet place where you can sit comfortably with your eyes closed. Remove your shoes. •Allow your body to go as loose as you can and take 5 deep breaths. •Select a specific muscle group to begin with (i.e. Your left foot) and focus on those muscles. •Work each of these muscles groups: individual feet; lower leg and foot; entire leg; individual hands; entire arm; buttocks; stomach; chest; neck and shoulders; mouth; eyes; and forehead. •Take one slow, deep breath while tensing the muscles you’ve selected for 5 seconds. Make sure you can feel the tension in your muscles before you move on. •Allow all the tension to leave the muscles you’ve selected while exhaling. •Pay close attention to how these muscles feels when tense and when relaxed. •Stay relaxed for 15 seconds, then select another muscle group and repeat the same steps. Try guided visualization. Using visualization to relax is exactly what it sounds like — you visualize something that you find extremely relaxing in order to reduce your anxiety and reduce your fears. A guided visualization is where you listen to a recording where someone talks you through the process step-by-step. There are many free guided visualizations available online, some with background music or sound effects to help make the process seem more real. Guided visualization recordings will provide the instructions on how to prepare yourself and what to do. They will also vary in length, so you can select the ones that work best for you. Working with Exposure Therapy Develop an exposure plan. The reason you learned relaxation techniques was to keep yourself calm while slowly building up your exposure to dogs. But before you start allowing dogs to be in your presence, you need to develop a plan. This plan should include each step you’re going to go through between now (no dogs) and actually being in their presence. Your plan should be customized for your particular type of fears, and the fearful situations you personally experience. The list should be written in order of least fearful to most fearful so you work your way up to conquering your most fearful situation. An example of a plan to overcome your fear of dogs is as follows: •Step 1 - draw a dog on a piece of paper. •Step 2 - read about dogs. •Step 3 - look at photos of dogs. •Step 4 - look at videos of dogs. •Step 5 - look at dogs through a closed window. •Step 6 - look at dogs through a partially opened window. •Step 7 - look at dogs through an open window. •Step 8 - look at dogs through a doorway. •Step 9 - look at dogs from outside the doorway. •Step 10 - look at a dog (who is on a leash) in the next room. •Step 11 - look at a dog (who is on a leash) in the same room. •Step 12 - sit beside a dog. •Step 13 - pet a dog. Create and practice using an anxiety distress scale. Use the scale to measure your level of anxiety, with 0 being totally relaxed and 100 being the most fear/anxiety/discomfort you have ever experienced. This is a helpful tool for measuring how your distress levels change over time. The anxiety distress scale can also help you decide when it's time for you to move to the next step of your exposure plan. Be patient and take your time. Don't move to the next step too quickly. Engage the help of a trusted friend with a dog. At some point in your plan you will have to place yourself in the presence of an actual dog. You need this dog to be handled by a competent and trustful person, and the dog needs to be predictable and well-trained. Talk to the dog’s owner in advance of executing your plan and explain to them what you’re trying to accomplish. They should be patient and understanding as they may need to simply sit there with their dog for a while as your acclimatize to the dog’s presence. It is not a good idea to use a puppy, even if you think they’re cuter and not as violent. Puppies are not well-trained and can be quite unpredictable. This can cause them to do something unexpected in your presence which may only exacerbate your fear. Eventually, if you’re able to, have your friend teach you basic commands for the dog so you can control the dog yourself. Being in control of the dog may further help you to alleviate your fears once you realize you have the ability to direct their actions. Start facing your fear of dogs. Start with the first item on your plan and carry it out. Repeatedly carry it out until you feel less anxious and fearful doing it. If the step you’re doing allows you to stay in one place (i.e. Watch dogs though a window), slowly expand the length of time you perform the activity as well. Use the relaxation techniques you practiced to help keep yourself calm. Use your journal to keep track of your progress. Write down each attempt you make and how it went. Rate your level of anxiety and fear before and after each attempt. Remember that your exposure to dogs should be planned, prolonged and repeated. Don’t feel you need to rush. Take your time on each step of your plan until you feel comfortable moving onto the next step. Practice regularly. This part of the recovery process is going to be the hardest you’ll have to go through, but the only way it’s going to be successful is if you keep it up. Make a schedule where you practice on a regular basis. If at all possible, practice daily. Reward yourself for the progress you make. If needed, build rewards into your plan so you have an extra goal to work towards for each step. Should you need any further assistance. Please feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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For the last seven to eight years, I was diagnosed as suffering from "affective disorder" As per psychiatrist I am suffering mild depression. It manifested then I was unable to sleep for days and, less confidence, fear of loosing and defeat. Doctor suggested antidepressant medicine and for sleep. I feel better but I have been hooked with the medicine. On any day if I do not take the medicine, I remain whole night, no sleep, only roll on the bed. I am with the medicine, but I do not feel weel in the morning, lethargy whole day, feel sleepy, but poor sleep in the night. My sleep breaks sometimes at 2, or 3 a.m. And remain in an unconscious state but full aware of night is passing away dawn is there. Can I get a permanent solution to all these problem and weak immunity, weak digestive power. A.K.Sarkar.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
For the last seven to eight years, I was diagnosed as suffering from "affective disorder" As per psychiatrist I am su...
If you have trouble sleeping, there are some things you can do to help yourself get a good restful night. These include making changes in: your environment your behaviour and routine your thinking change your environment are there any helpful changes you can make? bedroom too light (or dark) bedroom too hot or too cold bedroom too noisy bed too uncomfortable partner keeping you awake? (snoring, restless etc) tv, computer, tablet or mobile in your bedroom making changes to your environment so that your bedrooms become a restful place for sleeping. Remove excess light (particularly blue light), make sure the temperature is right, and check the bed and pillow are comfortable. If you cannot reduce the noise, then consider ear-plugs designed for sleep use. Remove tv and device screens from your bedroom, and read from a conventional book rather than an e-book on a back-lit screen. Change your behaviour use your choice of relaxation technique before going to bed (whatever works for you) do not go without sleep for a long time if you can help it. Keep to a regular pattern of going to bed and getting up at the same time every day, whether you are tired or not keep bed for sleep. No watching television, browsing the internet or checking your email or social media. Get some exercise during the day. Try some regular swimming or walking. Avoid exercise late in the evening. Reduce the caffeine (tea, coffee, some soft drinks) in the evening. Try a milky drink instead. Don`t drink a lot of alcohol. It may help you fall asleep, but you are more likely to wake up during the night. Don`t eat or drink a lot late at night. Try to have your evening meal early rather than late. If you have had a bad night, resist the temptation to sleep the next day which will make it harder to get off to sleep the following night. If something is troubling you and there is nothing you can do about it right away, try writing it down before going to bed and then tell yourself to deal with it tomorrow. If you cannot sleep, don`t lie there worrying about it. Get up and do something you find relaxing like reading or listening to quiet music. After a while you should feel tired enough to go to bed again. Keep a sleep diary for a week. Then you can look back and notice what helps you sleep better and what doesn`t, so you can make positive changes and do more of what helps, and less of what doesn`t. If nothing seemed to help, try something different. Avoid clock watching when in bed and put your attention somewhere restful change your thinking worrying about not sleeping will keep you awake! rather than put your focus of attention on the worrying thoughts, notice that they are just thoughts, then put your attention somewhere restful, use imagery, mindful breathing, or your relaxation technique. Tell yourself that worrying about it will not help, and that you probably are getting enough, just less than you think you need. Our needs change as we get older. If you're worrying about a particular problem, write it down, and tell yourself you can sort it in the morning. Distract yourself by thinking about a random sequence of objects for a few seconds each. E. G. A table, a tree, a saucepan, a flower, a cow, a cloud etc. Or you could think about a few items beginning with the letter" b" then move on through the alphabet.
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I was in a relationship with a Muslim girl. After a steady relationship of six months , she broke up with me. Since then I have almost become mad without her. Different symptoms of ecstasy like shedding of tears, bodily hairs standing erect ,horripilation manifested in my body. I went into severe depression. I cannot forget her. Please help me. I am in very need of help. I have dealt with many counsellors ,psychologists but nothing helped me. Please help me.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I was in a relationship with a Muslim girl. After a steady relationship of six months , she broke up with me. Since t...
It’s never easy when a significant relationship ends. Whatever the reason for the split—and whether you wanted it or not—the breakup of a relationship can turn your whole world upside down and trigger all sorts of painful and unsettling feelings. But there are plenty of things you can do to get through this difficult time and move on. You can even learn from the experience and grow into a stronger, wiser person. Coping with separation •Recognize that it’s OK to have different feelings. It’s normal to feel sad, angry, exhausted, frustrated, and confused—and these feelings can be intense. You also may feel anxious about the future. Accept that reactions like these will lessen over time. Even if the relationship was unhealthy, venturing into the unknown is frightening. •Give yourself a break. Give yourself permission to feel and to function at a less than optimal level for a period of time. You may not be able to be quite as productive on the job or care for others in exactly the way you’re accustomed to for a little while. No one is superman or superwoman; take time to heal, regroup, and re-energize. •Don’t go through this alone. Sharing your feelings with friends and family can help you get through this period. Consider joining a support group where you can talk to others in similar situations. Isolating yourself can raise your stress levels, reduce your concentration, and get in the way of your work, relationships, and overall health. Don’t be afraid to get outside help if you need it. Allow yourself to grieve the loss of the relationship Grief is a natural reaction to loss, and the breakup of a love relationship involves multiple losses: •Loss of companionship and shared experiences (which may or may not have been consistently pleasurable) •Loss of support, be it financial, intellectual, social, or emotional •Loss of hopes, plans, and dreams (can be even more painful than practical losses) Allowing yourself to feel the pain of these losses may be scary. You may fear that your emotions will be too intense to bear, or that you’ll be stuck in a dark place forever. Just remember that grieving is essential to the healing process. The pain of grief is precisely what helps you let go of the old relationship and move on. And no matter how strong your grief, it won’t last forever. Tips for grieving after a breakup : •Don’t fight your feelings – It’s normal to have lots of ups and downs, and feel many conflicting emotions, including anger, resentment, sadness, relief, fear, and confusion. It’s important to identify and acknowledge these feelings. While these emotions will often be painful, trying to suppress or ignore them will only prolong the grieving process. •Talk about how you’re feeling – Even if it is difficult for you to talk about your feelings with other people, it is very important to find a way to do so when you are grieving. Knowing that others are aware of your feelings will make you feel less alone with your pain and will help you heal. Journaling can also be a helpful outlet for your feelings. •Remember that moving on is the end goal – Expressing your feelings will liberate you in a way, but it is important not to dwell on the negative feelings or to over-analyze the situation. Getting stuck in hurtful feelings like blame, anger, and resentment will rob you of valuable energy and prevent you from healing and moving forward. •Remind yourself that you still have a future – When you commit to another person, you create many hopes and dreams. It’s hard to let these dreams go. As you grieve the loss of the future you once envisioned, be encouraged by the fact that new hopes and dreams will eventually replace your old ones. •Know the difference between a normal reaction to a breakup and depression – Grief can be paralyzing after a breakup, but after a while, the sadness begins to lift. Day by day, and little by little, you start moving on. However, if you don’t feel any forward momentum, you may be suffering from depression. Reach out to others for support through the grieving process Reach out to trusted friends and family members. People who have been through painful breakups or divorces can be especially helpful. They know what it is like and they can assure you that there is hope for healing and new relationships. •Spend time with people who support, value, and energize you. As you consider who to reach out to, choose wisely. Surround yourself with people who are positive and who truly listen to you. It’s important that you feel free to be honest about what you’re going through, without worrying about being judged, criticized, or told what to do. •Get outside help if you need it. If reaching out to others doesn’t come naturally, consider seeing a counselor or joining a support group. The most important thing is that you have at least one place where you feel comfortable opening up. •Cultivate new friendships. If you feel like you have lost your social network along with the divorce or breakup, make an effort to meet new people. Join a networking group or special interest club, take a class, get involved in community activities, or volunteer at a school, place of worship, or other community organization. Self-care tips: •Make time each day to nurture yourself. Help yourself heal by scheduling daily time for activities you find calming and soothing. Go for a walk in nature, listen to music, enjoy a hot bath, get a massage, read a favorite book, take a yoga class, or savor a warm cup of tea. •Pay attention to what you need in any given moment and speak up to express your needs. Honor what you believe to be right and best for you even though it may be different from what your ex or others want. Say "no" without guilt or angst as a way of honoring what is right for you. •Stick to a routine. A divorce or relationship breakup can disrupt almost every area of your life, amplifying feelings of stress, uncertainty, and chaos. Getting back to a regular routine can provide a comforting sense of structure and normalcy. •Take a time out. Try not to make any major decisions in the first few months after a separation or divorce, like starting a new job or moving to a new city. If you can, wait until you’re feeling less emotional so that you can make better decisions. •Avoid using alcohol, drugs, or food to cope. When you’re in the middle of a breakup, you may be tempted to do anything to relieve your feelings of pain and loneliness. But using alcohol, drugs, or food as an escape is unhealthy and destructive in the long run. It’s essential to find healthier ways of coping with painful feelings. •Explore new interests. A divorce or breakup is a beginning as well as an end. Take the opportunity to explore new interests and activities. Pursuing fun, new activities gives you a chance to enjoy life in the here-and-now, rather than dwelling on the past. Making healthy choices: Eat well, sleep well, and exercise When you’re going through the stress of a divorce or breakup, healthy habits easily fall by the wayside. You might find yourself not eating at all or overeating your favorite junk foods. Exercise might be harder to fit in because of the added pressures at home and sleep might be elusive. But all of the work you are doing to move forward in a positive way will be pointless if you don’t make long-term healthy lifestyle choices. If you need any further assistance feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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The Benefits of Pets For Human Health

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune

The benefits of pets for human health

 

Animals play an important role in many people's lives. In addition to seeing-eye dogs and dogs that can be trained to detect seizures, animals can also be used in occupational therapy, speech therapy, or physical rehabilitation help patient recover. Aside from these designated therapeutic roles, animals are also valued as companions, which can certainly affect the quality of our lives.

 

Some research studies have found that people who have a pet have healthier hearts; don't feel homesick, make fewer visits to the doctor, get more exercise, and are less depressed. Pets may also have a significant impact on allergies, asthma, social support, and social interactions with other people.

 

Pet therapy builds on the pre-existing human-animal bond. Interacting with a friendly pet can help many physical and mental issues. It can help reduce blood pressure and improve overall cardiovascular health. It can also release endorphins that produce a calming effect. This can help alleviate pain, reduce stress, and improve your overall psychological state.

 

Pets lower stress and depression : Research shows that just patting /stroking your cat or dog can lower your blood pressure and make you feel calmer. Even watching fish swimming in an aquarium ease tense muscles. It can also help you relax and practice mindfulness. Playing with your pet increases the levels of the feel-good chemicals serotonin and dopamine in your brain. A study done by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that people recover from a stressful situation more quickly when they're with their pets than with their partners or friends

 

A pet is good for your heart : High levels of cholesterol and triglycerides can up your risk of heart disease, but owning a cat or dog can lower both, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Owning a cat or dog can also increase your chances of surviving a heart attack.

 

Pets fulfill the basic human need to touch : Simply patting a pet can lower your heart rate. Research indicates a 45-minute massage can decrease levels of the stress hormone cortisol and optimize your immune system by building white blood cells. Hugging floods our bodies with oxytocin, a hormone that reduces stress, and lowers blood pressure and heart rates.

 

Pets make us responsible: With pets come great responsibility, and responsibility according to depression research promotes mental health.

 

Pets increase your social interaction: Pets create opportunities for better social interaction. If you have a fear of social situations, or social phobia, a pet can help with slowly introducing you to other people who also have pets and enhance your mental health.

 

Pets improve your fitness : Walking a dog regularly means you're less likely to be obese and more likely to be physically active, the NIH has found.

 

 

 

Benefit of Pets for Child's Development

 

When a child has no brothers or sisters, research shows that pets help children develop greater empathy, higher self-esteem, and increased participation in social and physical activities. Not only do children who grow up with pets have less risk of allergies and asthma, many also learn responsibility, compassion, and empathy from having a dog or cat.

 

Unlike parents or teachers, pets are never critical and don't give orders. They are always loving and their mere presence at home can help provide a sense of security in children. Having an ever-present pet can help ease separation anxiety in children.

Having the love and companionship of a loyal dog can make a child feel important and help him or her develop a positive self-image.

Children who are emotionally attached to their dog are better able to build relationships with other people.

Studies have also shown that dogs can help calm hyperactive or overly aggressive children. Of course, both the dog and the child need to be trained to behave appropriately with each other.

Some children with autism or other learning difficulties are better able to interact with pets than people. Autistic children often rely on nonverbal cues to communicate, just as dogs do. And learning to first connect with a pet may even help an autistic child in his or her interactions with people.

Pets can help children with learning disabilities learn how to regulate stress and calm them, making them better equipped to overcome the challenges of their disorder.

Playing and exercising with a dog can help a child with learning disorders stay alert and attentive throughout the day. It can also be a great antidote to stress and frustration caused by the learning disability.

I am 29 years male weight 60 kg had problem of depression in past, now I'm married, feeling very less ejaculation of semen I was on finasteride for 3 month in the last 6mnth. Also eating less.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I am 29 years male weight 60 kg had problem of depression in past, now I'm married, feeling very less ejaculation of ...
Depression adversely affects every aspect of our lives – including our relationships – and when one partner is depressed, the relationship may suffer badly. Depression can cause adverse effects on any activity that requires energy, spontaneity and good co-ordination – and that includes sex. And, sadly, lots of individuals who are depressed often appear to lose interest in sex. •In men, the general damping down of brain activity causes feelings of tiredness and hopelessness, which may be associated with loss of libido and erection problems. Some days will seem better than others. On your better days, try to make an effort to show love and appreciation to your partner. •Try to go for a walk every day, preferably with your partner. Walking not only gets you out in the fresh air, but, like other forms of exercise, it releases endorphins in the brain. These are 'happy' chemicals that rapidly elevate your mood. And there's considerable evidence to suggest that exercise can be as good for combating depression as any antidepressant. •Even during your saddest periods, try to spot happy moments like a bird singing or a new flower blooming in your garden. Try to train yourself to notice three of these heart-warming moments per day. •You may have an odd relationship with food while you're depressed (you could have little appetite or constantly comfort eat), but try to eat five pieces of fruit per day. This is a caring thing to do for yourself and is good for your physical and mental health. •Listen to music that matters to you. •Have faith that the depression will pass and that you will enjoy your life again. •Even if you don't feel like full-on sex, do make the effort to have a cuddle. If you are worried that cuddling will project you into full sex when you don't want it, just tell your partner that you're not feeling like having sex, but that you would really like to cuddle up. If you do this, you may both feel a lot better. Touch and closeness can keep a relationship. Regards,
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I have a lot of stress because of my job related issues. I am very depressed so what should I do to avoid my depression.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I have a lot of stress because of my job related issues. I am very depressed so what should I do to avoid my depression.
Take charge of your situation. To the extent that this is possible, set and re-set priorities. Take care of important and difficult tasks first. Organize your time. You can be more effective. 2. Be realistic about what you can change. Don't set yourself up for frustration and failure. Set realistic and attainable goals. Do what's possible. Accept the rest. Now you're ready to carry on. 3. Take one task at a time. Divide each large project into smaller, manageable tasks. Make a list of everything, which needs to be done, and the approximate time for finishing each task. Prioritize the tasks. Complete the first task then go on to the next one. Keep the tasks small until you are feeling a sense of accomplishment and control. 4. Be honest with colleagues. This includes the boss. Make it plain you feel in a bind. Chances are others are feeling the same. Don't just complain. Be constructive and make practical suggestions for improvement. 5 slow down. Learn to say" no. Drop activities that are not crucial 6. Recognize danger signs of job stress. Learn the symptoms of job stress and take action as soon as they appear to be getting out of hand. 7. Take care of your physical health. Good physical health increases your stress tolerance. Eat and sleep sensibly. Get plenty of exercise. Cut down or eliminate alcohol, tobacco and drugs, which alter our regular body rhythms and sleep 8. Learn to relax. Find a safety valve, whether it is a sport, hobby, music, reading or just walking. Use it to create a" bridge" between work and home life. 9. Don't neglect your private life. Work out a schedule, which allows you to do justice to both work and personal life. Stick to it. 10. Consider changing or quitting your job. It's a last resort, but still an option to you. If finances will not allow you to consider this, you might choose to concentrate on your personal life. If home life is more productive, more stimulating and more fun, it can take some of the sting out of an unhappy work situation. Seeking professional help is just one more method of coping. Knowing when you need professional help is a sign of strength and self-knowledge, not a weakness. Almost all of us have, at some time, felt depressed over such stressful life events as job loss, illness, or a death in the family. This depression may temporarily affect concentration and performance at work. The situation may be serious if depression persists for more than two weeks.
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Clapping Has Incredible Health Benefits!

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Clapping Has Incredible Health Benefits!

We all think of clapping as a way to applaud somebody for a job well done in sports, award shows, theater or movies. However, there are a number of hidden benefits that clapping has been proven to have. In the recent years, there are different types of groups in parks who get together in the morning and/or evening. Some of these groups indulge in laughing, there is also another group who gather around to clap.

Our body is a bundle of nerves and blood vessels spread all through the body and is one of the most complex networks we will ever know. Each organ is linked to the other and a bad effect on one organ can affect the other, which may seem remotely linked. The palms in specific contain nerve and blood vessel endings and stimulating them through clapping helps improve health of organs like kidney, digestive tract, and lower back. Sounds interesting? Read on to know more.

There are about 30+ acupressure points in the palms, which are activated when you are clapping. These connect various organs including low back, neck, kidneys, lungs stomach, etc. and have indirect benefits as noted below.

Clapping is known to improve the overall heart health and improve blood pressure. Blood circulation to various organs is also improved by regular clapping. Clapping also helps improve asthma related problems by promoting function of nerve endings that connect these organs.

In children especially, clapping is known to improve the brain function and contribute to better handwriting, reduced spelling mistakes and improved concentration.

Clapping helps immunity by boosting white cells, which are essential for fighting germs and therefore reduces the occurrence of frequent infections. Regular clapping is also shown to have benefits on improved bone health in cases of arthritis and associated pains.

For the back, be it middle or low back pains, there is an immense benefit from clapping. The severity of the pain can be reduced significantly. Strange as it may seem, clapping is also shown to reduce instances of insomnia and improve hair health

For mental illnesses like depression and anxiety, clapping can be a very easy to do exercise that costs actually nothing. If you think the kidneys and palms are very distant from each other, think again. For gout, which affects the kidneys, clapping is shown to be immensely useful. Both the severity of gout and the progression of disease can be halted.

A word of caution: For better results, clapping is to be done after applying an oil like mustard oil or coconut oil. So the next time, clapping need not be a part of just applauding. Include it into your routine exercise and see the results for yourself, you will naturally smile.

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I really don't know what is happening to me 1 week before I have joined in a hostel that was the first time I have to stay in the hostel I am feeling terror sometimes I feel happy and sometimes I feel so sad now I am at home when I thought about the hostel that was a terrifying thought to me also please help me. I really don't want to go there.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I really don't know what is happening to me 1 week before I have joined in a hostel that was the first time I have to...
It could be that you are unable to adjust to the new situations. Most of the time, people adjust to such changes within a few months. But if you continue to feel down or self-destructive, you may have an adjustment disorder. An adjustment disorder is a type of stress-related mental illness. You may feel anxious or depressed, or even have thoughts of suicide. Your normal daily routines may feel overwhelming. Or you may make reckless decisions. In essence, you have a hard time adjusting to change in your life, and it has serious consequences. You don't have to tough it out on your own, though. Adjustment disorder treatment — usually brief — is likely to help you regain your emotional footing.
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I am 30 years old . My self sumit from Ludhiana . So many times my head ache in forehead and in side area of head . And so many times my headache cause of a lot of thought. But I am trying do thing less . But I am not success in this activities. I am taking clonazepam 2 to 3 tablets in week . But I don't have got any relief from this dies. Some times my blood pressure is 90/138.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I am 30 years old . My self sumit from Ludhiana . So many times my head ache in forehead and in side area of head . A...
In order to prevent tension headaches, you need to reduce your anxiety. The first thing you need to do is make sure that you understand your headaches are a result of anxiety. For those with severe anxiety, or that suffer from panic attacks, it's not uncommon to get a rush of anxiety when you suffer from a headache, or any kind of weird sensation in your head. For example, a quick, sharp, shooting pain in the head that happens in a moment and leaves quickly can easily be caused by anxiety, but has a tendency to trigger anxiety attacks in those with panic disorder. You need to take time to convince yourself of this thought, because one of the main issues with tension headaches is that the fear it's something worse leads to further stress and further tension. In addition, you need to follow it up with anxiety reduction strategies: •Make sure that you're exercising, eating healthy, and drinking plenty of water. Poor eating habits and inactivity genuinely lead to more anxiety, and this may easily be contributing to your anxiety and headaches. •Learn anxiety reduction strategies for before your anxiety is out of control. Tension headaches can be stopped if they're stopped when the headaches are mild. As soon as you start feeling stressed, start deep breathing or progressive muscle relaxation to gain more control over the amount of stress you experience. •Always try to get enough sleep. Sleep is one of life's main coping strategies, and a lack of sleep contributes to further stress, and further eye strain (both of which lead to more tension headaches. Finally, you'll need to figure out how your anxiety is affecting you and what steps can be taken to cure it completely. If you have any further query feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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I frequently observes mood swings ,and mostly feel depressed for no reason and think repeatedly for what sins I have made for being depressed but do not know y it happens mostly can you suggest a remedy or medicine for it.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
I frequently observes mood swings ,and mostly feel depressed for no reason and think repeatedly for what sins I have ...
If you also have depression, you, can relate to the gnawing, stubborn and heavy weight of guilt. Depression dampens a person’s reasoning and problem-solving functions. “This is why a person can feel unrealistically negative about himself, feel guilty or responsible for things that he might not truly believe if the depression wasn’t active.” 5 Tips to Help Chip Away at Your Guilt Of course, guilt isn’t something that simply dissolves with several quick fixes. But you can slowly chip away at your guilt. The below tips may help. 1. Move your body. Getting physical will lower cortisol, increase endorphin flow and awaken your senses.” It also helps people with depression think more clearly and feel better overall. 2. Shift your thoughts. “Feelings of guilt can set a depressed individual into a cycle of negative thinking; each thought worsening into a deeper, more hopeless frame of thinking. That’s why working on your thoughts is key. It is suggested to revise negative thoughts into positive thoughts or using positive imagery. 3. Remember guilty thoughts are not facts. It is helpful to remind yourself that your guilt is just a voice. “Once you say, ‘Oh, there’s the guilt,’ you can put some distance between yourself and the guilt.” 4. Try humor. Humor can lighten the heaviness. For many people with depression, guilt is a real and stubborn symptom. It manipulates the facts and exacerbates your mood. But while guilt can be persistent and overwhelming, it also can be managed and minimized. If you have any further queries feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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Hello sir/madam I was unable to sleep if I get so I am not getting sound sleep through which I am unable to concentrate in any work and I get exhausted easily by the way I hit gym very regularly still I can't sleep.

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
Hello sir/madam I was unable to sleep if I get so I am not getting sound sleep through which I am unable to concentra...
1. Retrain your mind and body for sleep. If you can’t sleep, then get up and do something instead of lying there worrying. It’s the worry that gets you, not the lack of sleep. When we lie sleeplessly in bed our brain begins to associate bed with sleeplessness. Stimulus control therapy works to retrain your brain how to sleep. There are some guidelines you can follow on your own that can really help in this area. First, avoid using your bed for anything (ok almost anything!) except sleep. Secondly, if you are in bed awake for more than 20 minutes, get up and sit in a chair outside of the sleeping area and participate in a non-activating activity in low light. For example reading, crafting, or implementing a relaxation exercises. Try not to use anything with a screen. Sleep Hygiene can also contribute to training your body to sleep. One healthy step towards this is to develop a nighttime ritual. Having a cup of tea (decaffeinated), taking a warm shower, stretching, changing into specific pajamas before bed can all help send messages to your brain that it is time to go to sleep. 2. Manage your stress and worry. Stress and anxiety can create substantial barriers to sleep. Some tools that you can use during your day and near bedtime to reduce worry and stress are breathing exercises and muscle relaxation exercises. Both of these tools can help to reduce stress and induce relaxation which will help you prepare your body and mind to rest. Worry time: Pick a scheduled time to worry and write your worries down. If you think of something during the rest of the day, tell yourself you will worry about that during your “worry time.” If you must, take a minute to write down your worry at that time. Lastly, don’t look at the clock while sleeping! This can lead to increased pressure and worry about sleeping. I have had clients that go so far as to put the clock in another part of the room or put tape over the screen to avoid temptation. 3. Daily Activities and next steps What you do during the day does affect the quality of your sleep. There is plenty of evidence that supports the fact that exercising during the day can help you sleep better. Also, napping during the day can negatively affect your nighttime sleep. If you have any further query feel free to contact. Regards, Sukanya Biswas.
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