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Dr. Swati Joshi

MD - Psychiatry

Psychiatrist, Pune

22 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Dr. Swati Joshi MD - Psychiatry Psychiatrist, Pune
22 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹ online
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I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Swati Joshi
Dr. Swati Joshi is a trusted Psychiatrist in Kothrud, Pune. She has had many happy patients in her 22 years of journey as a Psychiatrist. She is a MD - Psychiatry. She is currently practising at Asha poly clinic in Kothrud, Pune. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Swati Joshi on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 43 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Pune and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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MD - Psychiatry - Smt. NHL Municipal Medical College - 1994
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English
Hindi

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Anand nilay business centre, near bank of maharastra , karve statue chowk, kothrud punePune Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Hi sir/mam, I am suffering from Anxiety and Depression from Last 5-6 months and I had tried all Medicines including Allopathy, ayurvedic & Now m Taking Homeopathy! But not the bttr result! I always think Negative and due to that I get in depression and feel alone and helpless! I always feel Worried that whats going to happened with me in negative way! Please help me and suggest me some natural ways to Kill Anxiety and Depression! Coz I want to live Happily With My 2 children! 1 is of 3 years old girl and anther is 20 day old boy! thanks Alot in Advance.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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Hi sir/mam, I am suffering from Anxiety and Depression from Last 5-6 months and I had tried all Medicines including A...
“Anxiety is a normal, predictable part of life. However, “people with an anxiety disorder are essentially phobic about the feeling state of anxiety.” And they’ll go to great lengths to avoid it. Some people experience generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), excessive anxiety about real-life concerns, such as money, relationships, health and academics, Others struggle with society anxiety, and worry about being evaluated or embarrassing themselves, he said. People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) might become preoccupied with symmetry or potential contamination. “The bottom line is that people can experience anxiety, and anxiety disorders, related to just about anything. Most of these steps contribute to a healthy and fulfilling life, overall. For instance, “making some basic lifestyle changes can do wonders for someone coping with elevated anxiety,” Take these steps from today. 1. Take a deep breath. “Deep diaphragmatic breathing triggers our relaxation response, switching from our fight-or-flight response of the sympathetic nervous system, to the relaxed, balanced response of our parasympathetic nervous system,” according to, clinical psychologists. Who have suggested the following exercise, which you can repeat several times: Inhale slowly to a count of four, starting at your belly and then moving into your chest. Gently hold your breath for four counts. Then slowly exhale to four counts. 2. Get active. “One of the most important things one can do [to cope with anxiety] is to get regular cardiovascular exercise,” For instance, a brisk 30- to 60-minute walk “releases endorphins that lead to a reduction in anxiety.” You can start today by taking a walk. Or create a list of physical activities that you enjoy, and put them on your schedule for the week. Other options include: running, rowing, rollerblading, hiking, biking, dancing, swimming, surfing, step aerobics, kickboxing and sports such as soccer, tennis and basketball. 3. Sleep well. Not getting enough sleep can trigger anxiety. If you’re having trouble sleeping, tonight, engage in a relaxing activity before bedtime, such as taking a warm bath, listening to soothing music or taking several deep breaths. And, if you’re like many people with anxiety whose brains start buzzing right before bed, jot down your worries earlier in the day for 10 to 15 minutes, or try a mental exercise like thinking of fruits with the same letter. 4. Challenge an anxious thought. “We all have moments wherein we unintentionally increase or maintain our own worry by thinking unhelpful thoughts. These thoughts are often unrealistic, inaccurate, or, to some extent, unreasonable,” Thankfully, we can change these thoughts. The first step is to identify them. Consider how a specific thought affects your feelings and behaviours. Is it helpful or unhelpful? These are the types of thoughts you want to challenge. Therefore it is suggested asking yourself: “Is this worry realistic?” “Is this really likely to happen?” “If the worst possible outcome happens, what would be so bad about that?” “Could I handle that?” “What might I do?” “If something bad happens, what might that mean about me?” “Is this really true or does it just seem that wa Then, “reframe or correct that thought to make it more accurate, realistic and more adaptive.” Here’s one example: “I would feel embarrassed if I tripped on the stage, but that’s just a feeling; it wouldn’t last forever, and I would get through it.” 5. Say an encouraging statement. Positive, accurate statements can help to put things into perspective. See these examples: “Anxiety is just a feeling, like any other feeling.” and “This feels bad, but I can use some strategies to [cope with] it.” 6. Stay connected to others. “Social support is vital to managing stress,” Today, call a loved one, schedule a Skype date or go to lunch with a close friend. “Talking with others can do a world of good.” Another option is to get together and engage in an activity that improves your anxiety, such as taking a walk, sitting on the beach or going to a yoga class. 7. Avoid caffeine. Managing anxiety is as much about what you do as what you don’t do. And there are some substances that exacerbate anxiety. Caffeine is one of those substances. As said, “The last thing people with anxiety need is a substance that makes them feel more amped up, which is exactly what caffeine does.” 8. Avoid mind-altering substances. “While drugs and alcohol might help to reduce anxiety in the short term, they often do just the opposite in the long term,” Even the short-term effect can be harmful. Experts have treated countless clients whose first panic attack occurred while they were taking drugs such as marijuana, ecstasy or LSD. “Panic attacks are bad enough if you are straight and sober, so imagine how bad they are if you are high, and can’t get un-high until the drug wears off.” 9. Do something you enjoy. Engaging in enjoyable activities helps to soothe your anxiety. For instance, today, you might take a walk, listen to music or read a book, 10. Take a break. It’s also helpful to build breaks into your day. As it is said, this might be a “simple change of pace or scenery, enjoying a hobby, or switching ‘to-do’ tasks.” “Breaking from concerted effort can be refreshing.” 11. Problem-solve. It is suggested considering how you can address the stressors that are causing your anxiety. Today, make a list of these stressors and next to each one, jot down one or two solutions. 12. Pick up a book. There are many valuable resources on anxiety, which teach you effective coping skills. Some recommended are Dying of Embarrassment for people with social anxiety; The BDD Workbook for body dysmorphic disorder; The Imp of the Mind and The OCD Workbook for obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is suggested Stop Obsessing for adults with OCD (and Up and Down the Worry Hill for kids with OCD). For people with panic attacks, it is suggested Don’t Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks. For a general overview of cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety, 13. Engage in calming practices. “Meditation, yoga, or other calming practices can help minimize anxiety in both the short and long term.” Sign up for a yoga class or watch a yoga video online. (Curvy Yoga is a wonderful and sizes.) Meditate right now for just three minutes resource for yoga for all shapes 14. Contact a therapist. “Sometimes anxiety can be difficult to manage without professional help,” Many organizations include databases of providers who specialize in anxiety (along with helpful information). 15. Accept your anxiety. “If you really want to effectively manage your anxiety, the key is to accept it,” This might sound counterintuitive. But anxiety, “in and of itself,” isn’t the real problem. Instead, it’s our attempts at controlling and eliminating it, he said. “Not accepting these unwanted inner experiences is the actual source of so much of our self-induced suffering.” Accepting anxiety doesn’t mean “resign[ing] ourselves to a life of anxious misery. It simply means that we are better off recognizing and fully accepting the existence of anxiety and other uncomfortable emotional states that are inevitable, but transitory,” So if you experience anxiety today, simply observe it. “Think of it like a wave of the ocean; allow it to come in, experience it, and ride it out.” Anxiety can feel overwhelming. It can feel like chains around your feet, weighing you down. But by taking small steps – like the ones above – you can minimize your anxiety and cope effectively.
1 person found this helpful

Dear sir I am suffering from headache for 1 year, but I am still suffering from it. I have tried so much medicines but I am till not cured well. It causes lack of concentration in my studies and being unhappy in the class. I want to remove it fully by natural products. So sir please suggest me some light medicines and diet plan to get rid of this headache?

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath
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Dear sir I am suffering from headache for 1 year, but I am still suffering from it.
I have tried so much medicines bu...
Homoeopathic medicine r-16 drops (dr reckeweg) drink 20 drops in 20 ml fresh water 3 times daily. B. C.-12 (dr reckeweg)) chew 4 tabs every 2-4 hrly daily depending upon intensity of pain-- daily 30 min bramari prnayam early morning avoid fast and junk food and try tohave home made diet only avoid strong smelllike perfumes, deo, paints.
1 person found this helpful

I have bodypains over three days without doing any work what is the reason for that?

PGDHHM, MBBS
General Physician
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I have bodypains over three days without doing any work what is the reason for that?
It could be due to fever, tiredness ,viral infections ,premenstrual symdrome Get ur temp checked. Take over-the-counter painkiller if required. . Drink plenty of liquids. Eat healthy diet. Take adequate rest. Hope this helps u. If required, consult with details.

5 Types of Common Depression

DPM Gold Medalist - , MD Psychiatry Gold Medalist - , MBBS
Psychiatrist
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Depression is a very common emotion you might have experienced at least once during your lifetime. Depression refers to a state of mind when you are feeling low due to persistent sadness and loss of interest. But if the depression is chronic and long lasting for you, then it indicates that you are suffering from clinical depression. Under clinical depression, it is preferable that you go through a proper treatment course by a certified therapist. The Most common types of depressions are:

  1. Major depression - Under this type of a depression you will be depressed for most days of the week and if this condition extends for a period greater than 2 weeks, then it is a case of major depression. The most common method to treat a major depression is to talk to a mental health specialist and take medications called antidepressants (only after a prescription by a certified doctor).
  2. Persistent depressive disorder - This is a more severe and long lasting type of depression which is identified if you are depressed over a period longer than 2 hours. The most common symptoms of this type of a disorder are - change in your appetite, too much or too little sleep, lack of energy or fatigue, low self-esteem, trouble concentrating or making decisions, feeling hopeless among others.
  3. Bipolar disorder - If you are experiencing extreme ups and downs of mood abruptly and without any apparent reason, then you might be suffering from this disorder. This disorder is commonly known as a maniac depression, because during an up phase you will be extremely happy, joyful outgoing and talkative but during the low phase you will be sad, tired and depressed.
  4. Seasonal affective disorder - This type of a depression might bother you only during the winter season. This happens whenever the days are shorter and your body is not able to get enough of sunlight. This mostly happens in the case of people who are very fond of sunlight, and they prefer the sunshine over dark periods of the night. This disorder is treated by SAD antidepressants and everyday light therapy of 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Psychotic depression - Under this type of a depression, you will have a major depression along with some psychotic symptoms like - hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia. Hallucinations mean viewing things that are not there, in reality, delusions are false beliefs or misconceptions and paranoia is the constant fear that somebody is going to harm you.

'Consult'.

Related Tip: Depression: Why is this SILENT KILLER taking our YOUTH away?

5 Types of Common Depression
4403 people found this helpful

I feel vey bore and not to concentrated on study well wt is the reason it is please help me.

BHMS
Homeopath
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Hi. Homoeopathic medicines are very effective for increasing concentration and if done with yoga, will give you great results! But practice the following poses if you don’t have any medical condition or pregnancy or else take an advice from your concern doctor and then only perform these. 1.Shashankasana: Sit in Vajrasana with hands on the thighs. The upper body is straight and relaxed. Inhaling raise both arms above the head. Exhaling keep the back straight and bend upper body and arms forward from the hips, until arms and forehead touch the floor. The buttocks remain on the heels. Breathing normally remain in this position for a while. Relax the whole body, especially the shoulders, neck and back. Inhaling keep the back straight and raise the upper body and arms. Exhaling return to the starting position. Practice the exercise 3 times in total. Remain bending forward for sometime and consciously perceive the movement of the breath on the spine. 2.Virasana: Sit in Vajrasana. Hands rest on the thighs and the body is relaxed. Bring the left foot beside the right knee with the sole of the foot flat on the floor. Place the left elbow on the left knee and rest the chin in the hand. Right hand rests on the right thigh. Tuck the toes of the right foot under. The right knee remains in contact with the floor. Transfer the weight onto the right heel. Concentrate on a fixed point in front. Breathing normally remain in this position for as long as comfortable. Return to the starting position. Repeat on the other side. 3.Sit in Vajrasana. Body is straight and hands rest on the thighs. Relax the whole body. Inhaling stretch the arms above the head, then bring them behind the back and grasp the left wrist with the right hand. Exhaling bend the body forward from the hips, keeping the back straight, until the forehead touches the floor. The buttocks remain on the heels. Breathing normally concentrate on the whole body and relax. Remain in this position for as long as comfortable. Inhaling slowly bring the body upright. At the same time stretch the arms above the head. Exhaling return to the starting position. Medication: Take homoeopathic medicine - Anacardium 200/ once daily.
1 person found this helpful

She gets depressed easily on small problems also. What should I do?

PhD (Psychology), MSc Psychology, MS
Psychologist
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She gets depressed easily on small problems also. What should I do?
Dear , you must be able to differentiate between depression and disappointment or frustration. She could be disappointed over and over again and there will be reason behind it. I suggest telephone counseling to her with me. Please let me know whether she is willing or not. Take care.

I am feeling depression kisi se baat krne ka dil nai krta Gussa 15 min ka bhaut jayada aata hai husband k sath fights raheti hai marriage ko Nov mein 2 years complete Ho jaenge life se satisfies nai Hu husband sex satisfaction nd financial nd support nd soft talking nai hai isi vajah se chichira pan raheta hai or useless baato pe fights hoti hoti.

psychologist
Psychologist
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Dear Lybrate user lybrate-user ,Ek baat aapko samajhni padegi ki Sabka nature different hota hai aur koi is world me perfect nahi hota kisi ke sath kuch problem hoti hai kisi ke sath kuch ,kitne husband apni wife ko physical torture bhi karte hai, cheat bhi karte hai but is point pe aap lucky ho. Iska ye matlab nahi ki is situation ko badla nahi ja sakta aur isko aap hi badal sakti ho ,aapko thoda samajhdari se kaam Lena hoga ,it's obvious humari apne life partner se kuch umeed hoti hai but life me sab kuch apne hisab se kisi ke sath nahi hota .Iska sabse achcha Rasta hai ki aap apne husband se baat karo aur samjhao ki jo hua us ko yahi pe full stop laga ke aap sab kuch naye Tarah se start krna chahti hai aur aap dono ko sath rahna hai to ye jaroori hai ki sab kuch restart kiya jaye achche se. I am sure wo bhi sab kuch normal karna chahte honge, koi apni life stressfull nahi banana chahta hai. Aapko Jab bhi gussa aaye kisi ko call Karke turant sab kuch share karo aur jo baat irritate kar rahi hai sab bata do. Iske regarding aap kisi counsellor ki help le sakte ho. Aap chaho to mujhse bhi online help le sakte ho. Take care.
1 person found this helpful

Hello Dr. I am 30 years old, m suffering from depression, sadness, even at this time m crying while typing. Have taken clonazepam and escitalopram for more than 1 year. I have a type relation with someone which is not fulfilling my demands and m not satisfied, we are very good friends, all the time I think about her, want her as if we had not a talk for few hours problem in breathing starts, I feel heavy weight on chest, I masturbate 3 times a day thinking of her, but from last three days I dint, nd feeling very low. Please help me. At this time I am wanting to be admitted in some hospital and give me some injections to sleep for few days continuous. My morning starts with checking her messages. All the day I wait for her calls and msgs. Please help.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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Hello Dr. I am 30 years old, m suffering from depression, sadness, even at this time m crying while typing. Have take...
I think that you have become addicted to her. This is not good for any relationship not for your mental wellbeing. Am I to assume that the depression is a result of the poor relationship or is it due to some other factors? If this is a one-sided relationship that too is not healthy and can never materialize. Ideally you should get out of this relationship and I see many of your problems resolved to your advantage. Meet a counselor soon and get that person’s guidance to get out of this relationship soon. For the depression please do the following: Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber, nuts, avocado, exercise regularly, eat dark chocolate, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. I suggest you do the opposite of what this depression makes you feel like doing (actually, not doing): you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least 30 minutes but not in the scotching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don’t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. Above all to be really happy, you need to live in love and for love: find someone else to love and to love you back. A counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success. Be positive everyday and learn to be contended with what you have. Do some left brain exercises: it is the happy brain. Here are a few suggestions: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly.
74 people found this helpful

Sir I am 25 years old and from last for months I am really disturbed sometimes I feel like getting out of this place. My friends their behaviour towards have changed in a great manner. This days I feel there is no importance of me in their life. Pls help me out.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist
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Sir I am 25 years old and from last for months I am really disturbed sometimes I feel like getting out of this place....
Dear lybrate user. I can understand. Everyone are important. Everyone has his or her unique qualities and aptitudes. Forget others. Let them talk anything they want. Instead of correcting others, worrying about others, please change your attitude towards others and circumstances. I suggest online counselling and cognitive behavior therapy. Take care.

I want to left smoking bt can not do that. Daily I smoke 5-6 cigrate. How to control on this. Could you please give a suggestion for this. And from lst 6 years m smoking cigrate.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist
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Dear Lybrate user. Tobacco is addictive. Cigarette also contains 4000+ carcinogenic chemicals other than nicotine. The best method is to leave it and continue with your will power. There are other methods like Nicotine Replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy combined. But still you will need will power. You may consult a physician or deaddiction therapist or a rehabilitation facility for further advise. Take care.

My wife aged 62 yrs diagnosed for Parkinson's taking rasolect. 5 ropark. 5 & pacitane 2 but no improvement.Please do help

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Neurologist
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Parkinson's disease-kampavata (a neurological disorder) parkinson's disease is a neurological disease, or brain disorder, that leads to progressive difficulty with balance and coordination. In people who have parkinson's disease, nerve cells in a region of the brain known as the substantia nigra become damaged or die. These cells are important because they produce the chemical dopamine, which helps to coordinate body movement-basal ganglia. When dopamine-producing cells degenerate/die, the areas in the brain that control movement can no longer function properly, and symptoms of parkinson's disease eventually develop. Parkinson? s disease prevalence:- parkinson's disease can affect anyone, but it most often occurs in people who are over the age of 50. Only 15 percent of parkinson's disease patients are diagnosed before they are 50 years old. The prevalence of parkinson's disease is nearly the same in both men and women, and recovery rate is more in men. People with a family history of parkinson's may have a higher risk of developing the disease, but parkinson's disease is rarely attributed to genetics alone. Parkinson's disease symptoms symptoms of parkinson's disease usually develop after about 80 percent of the brain's dopamine-producing cells are lost. The main symptoms of parkinson's disease include? tremors (kampam)- tremulousness (uncontrolled shaking or trembling) of the hands, arms, legs, face, body is often one of the first indicators of parkinson's disease? rigidity. Profound stiffness or an inability to easily move the arms, legs, and trunk, pain and stiffness on neck muscles is another hallmark of parkinson's? bradykinesia:- describes the unnaturally slow movements that are characteristic of people with parkinson's disease? poor balance- parkinson's disease affects balance, leading to difficulty walking and impaired coordination. The symptoms of parkinson's are generally mild at first, but become more severe over time, until they eventually interfere with your daily routine. This is usually the point when treatment is recommended. The outlook for people with parkinson's disease parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive condition, which means it is a lifelong disease that worsens over time when it is not treated properly. Each individual's situation is different, but in general, the first symptoms of parkinson's disease usually don't require treatment and may be restricted to one area or one side of the body. Movement of symptoms to the other side of the body? tremors that become more pronounced and interfere with activities? bradykinesia, or slow movement, that becomes disabling? difficulty with hand writing? impaired swallowing and chewing? speech that becomes monotone? poor balance and repeated falls? slow, shuffling gait (manner of walking)? stooped posture? facial expressions that become stiff and blank? chronic constipation? poor bladder control? sleep disturbances this progression is gradual in most people, but it may happen faster in some than others. Understandably, stress caused by the progression of the disease can lead to anxiety and depression. Ayurveda treatment: there is cure for parkinson's disease with ayurveda treatment, with ayurveda medicines and treatments we can relieve symptoms, slow down the progression and then we can completely arrest further degeneration of the of the cells, thereby we can completely control and cure the disease. If you are diagnosed with parkinson's disease, it is important to work closely with your medical team, so your medications can be regularly adjusted to help you remain as functional as possible for as long as possible. As far as parkinson's disease is concerned this is a brain related issue, so will surely effect the mind; so I recommend 49% treatment to patients and 51% treatment to family members.
1 person found this helpful

My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms like reduced motivation, speech and activity are occurred. Now he is on medications for that. He is on tab quiet 25 mg (Quetiapine Fumarate INN 28.728 mg equivalent to 25 mg of Quetiapine) once daily. 1 hour after taking this medicine he gets calm and sleeps. Even if he wakes up in the middle of the night, he was not in his senses at that time. Most of the time he urinates while he is asleep. Even he forgets to go to washroom and he poops in his pants but he forgets to wash himself. His condition is not improving. Kindly please suggest suitable medication which can cure above said things of his health.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, del...
Hi there ~ Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead Improving Emotional Health Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one. Preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care As you come to grips with an Alzheimer’s or other dementia diagnosis, you may be dealing with a whole range of emotions and concerns. You’ll no doubt be worried about how your loved one will change, how you’ll keep him or her comfortable, and how much your life will change. You’ll also likely be experiencing emotions such as anger, grief, and shock. Adjusting to this new reality is not easy. It’s important to give yourself some time and to reach out for help. The more support you have, the better you will be able to help your loved one. While some of these tips are directed specifically at Alzheimer’s patients, they may equally apply to those with other types of dementia as well, including vascular and mixed dementia. Early-stage Alzheimer’s care preparations There are some Alzheimer’s care preparations that are best done sooner rather than later. It may be hard to consider these questions at first, as it means thinking about a time when your loved one is already well down the road of his or her Alzheimer’s journey. However, putting preparations in place early helps a smoother transition for everyone. Depending on the stage of diagnosis, include the person with Alzheimer’s in the decision-making process as much as possible. If their dementia is at a more advanced stage, at least try to act on what their wishes would be. Questions to consider in preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care: Who will make healthcare and/or financial decisions when the person is no longer able to do so? While a difficult topic to bring up, if your loved one is still lucid enough, getting their wishes down on paper means they’ll be preserved and respected by all members of the family. Consider meeting with an elder law attorney to best understand your options. You’ll want to consider power of attorney, both for finances and for healthcare. If the person has already lost capacity, you may need to apply for guardianship/conservatorship. More information can be found in the Resources section below. How will care needs be met? Sometimes family members assume that a spouse or nearest family member can take on caregiving, but that is not always the case. Caregiving is a large commitment that gets bigger over time. The person with Alzheimer’s will eventually need round-the-clock care. Family members may have their own health issues, jobs, and responsibilities. Communication is essential to make sure that the needs of the Alzheimer’s patient are met, and that the caregiver has the support to meet those needs. Where will the person live? Is his or her own home appropriate, or is it difficult to access or make safe for later? If the person is currently living alone, for example, or far from any family or other support, it may be necessary to relocate or consider a facility with more support. Find out what assistance your medical team can provide in these areas. In some countries, you can also hire a care manager privately. Geriatric care managers can provide an initial assessment as well as assistance with managing your case, including crisis management, interviewing in-home help, or assisting with placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Developing day-to-day routines Having a general daily routine in Alzheimer’s and dementia care helps caregiving run smoothly. These routines won’t be set in stone, but they give a sense of consistency, which is beneficial to the Alzheimer’s patient even if they can’t communicate it. While every family will have their own unique routine, you can get some great ideas from your medical team or Alzheimer’s support group, especially regarding establishing routines to handle the most challenging times of day, such as evenings. Keep a sense of structure and familiarity. Try to keep consistent daily times for activities such as waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, receiving visitors, and bedtime. Keeping these things at the same time and place can help orientate the person. Let the person know what to expect even if you are not sure that he or she completely understands. You can use cues to establish the different times of day. For example, in the morning you can open the curtains to let sunlight in. In the evening, you can put on quiet music to indicate it’s bedtime. Involve the person in daily activities as much as they are able. For example, a person may not be able to tie their shoes, but may be able to put clothes in the hamper. Clipping plants outside may not be safe, but the person may be able to weed, plant, or water. Use your best judgment as to what is safe and what the person can handle. Communication tips As your loved one’s Alzheimer’s progresses, you will notice changes in communication. Trouble finding words, increased hand gestures, easy confusion, even inappropriate outbursts are all normal. Here are some do’s and don’ts on communicating: Communication Do's and Don'ts? Do Avoid becoming frustrated by empathizing and remembering the person can’t help their condition. Making the person feel safe rather than stressed will make communication easier. Take a short break if you feel your fuse getting short. Keep communication short, simple, and clear. Give one direction or ask one question at a time. Tell the person who you are if there appears to be any doubt. Call the person by name. Speak slowly. The person may take longer to process what’s being said. Use closed-ended questions which can be answered “yes” or “no.” For example, ask, “Did you enjoy the beef at dinner?” instead of “What did you have for dinner?” Find a different way to say the same thing if it wasn’t understood. Try a simpler statement with fewer words. Use distraction or fibs if telling the whole truth will upset the person with dementia. For example, to answer the question, “Where is my mother?” it may be better to say, “She’s not here right now” instead of “She died 20 years ago.” Use repetition as much as necessary. Be prepared to say the same things over and over as the person can’t recall them for more than a few minutes at a time. Use techniques to attract and maintain the person’s attention. Smile, make eye contact, use gestures, touch, and other body language. Don't Ever say things like: “Do you remember?” “Try to remember!” “Did you forget?” “How could you not know that? Ask questions that challenge short-term memory such as “Do you remember what we did last night?” The answer will likely be “no,” which may be humiliating for the person with dementia. Talk in paragraphs. Instead, offer one idea at a time. Point out the person’s memory difficulty. Avoid remarks such as “I just told you that.” Instead, just repeat it over and over. Talk in front of the person as if he or she were not present. Always include the person in any conversation when they are physically present. Use lots of pronouns such as "there, that, those, him, her, it. Use nouns instead. For example, instead of "sit there" say "sit in the blue chair. Use slang or unfamiliar words. The person may not understand the latest terms or phrases. Use patronizing language or “baby talk.” A person with dementia will feel angry or hurt at being talked down to. Use sarcasm or irony, even if meant humorously. Again, it can cause hurt or confusion. Planning activities and visitors As you develop daily routines, it’s important to include activities and visitors. You want to make sure that the Alzheimer’s patient is getting sensory experiences and socialization, but not to the point of getting overstimulated and stressed. Here are some suggestions for activities: Start with the person’s interests. Ask family and friends for memories of interests the person used to have. You’ll want to tailor the interests to the current level of ability so the person doesn’t get frustrated. Vary activities to stimulate different senses of sight, smell, hearing, and touch. For example, you can try singing songs, telling stories, movement such as dance, walking, or swimming, tactile activities such as painting, working with clay, gardening, or interacting with pets. Planning time outdoors can be very therapeutic. You can go for a drive, visit a park, or take a short walk. Even sitting on a balcony or in the backyard can be relaxing. Consider outside group activities designed for those with Alzheimer’s. Senior centers or community centers may host these types of activities. You can also look into adult day care programs, which are partial or full days at a facility catering to older adults and/or dementia patients. Visitors and social events Visitors can be a rich part of the day for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It can also provide an opportunity for you as the caregiver to socialize or take a break. Plan visitors at a time of day when your loved one can best handle them. Brief visitors on communication tips if they are uncertain and suggest they bring memorabilia your loved one may like, such as a favorite old song or book. Family and social events may also be appropriate, as long as the Alzheimer’s patient is comfortable. Focus on events that won’t overwhelm the person; excessive activity or stimulation at the wrong time of day might be too much to handle. Handling challenges in Alzheimer's and dementia care One of the most painful parts of Alzheimer’s disease is watching a loved one display behavior you never would have thought possible. Alzheimer’s can cause substantial changes in how someone acts. This can range from the embarrassing, such as inappropriate outbursts, to wandering, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Everyday tasks like eating, bathing, and dressing can become major challenges. Painful as some behaviors are, it’s critical not to blame yourself or try to handle all the changes in behavior alone. As challenging behavior progresses, you may find yourself too embarrassed to go out, for example, or to seek respite care. Unfortunately, difficult behavior is part and parcel of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t isolate yourself. Ask for help from the medical team and reach out to caregiver groups for support. There are ways to modify or better accommodate problem behaviors. Both the environment you create at home and the way you communicate with your loved one can make a substantial difference. Considering long-term Alzheimer's and dementia care It’s the nature of Alzheimer’s disease to progressively get worse as memory deteriorates. In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one will likely need round-the-clock care. Thinking ahead to these possibilities can help make decisions easier. To find links to organizations in your area that may be able to help, see Resources and References below. Care at home There are several options for extending care at home: In-home help refers to caregivers that you can hire to provide assistance for your loved one. In-home help ranges from a few hours a week of assistance to live-in help, depending on your needs. You’ll want to evaluate what sort of tasks you’d like help with, how much you can afford to spend, and what hours you need. Getting help with basic tasks like housekeeping, shopping, or other errands can also help you provide more focused care for your loved one. Day programs, also called adult day care, are programs that typically operate weekdays and offer a variety of activities and socialization opportunities. They also provide the chance for you as the caregiver to continue working or attend to other needs. There are some programs that specialize in dementia care. Respite care. Respite care is short-term care where your loved one stays in a facility temporarily. This gives you a block of time to rest, travel, or attend to other things. Is it time to move? As Alzheimer’s progresses, the physical and mental demands on you as caregiver can gradually become overwhelming. Each day can bring more challenges. The patient may require total assistance with physical tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as greater overall supervision. At some point, you won’t be able to leave your loved one alone. Nighttime behaviors may not allow you to sleep, and with some patients, belligerent or aggressive behaviors may exceed your ability to cope or feel safe. Every situation is different. Sometimes the gap can be bridged by bringing in additional assistance, such as in-home help or other family members to share the caregiving burden. However, it is not a sign of weakness if moving to your loved one to a facility seems like the best plan of care. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you’re overwhelmed by stress and fatigue, it’s difficult to maintain your caregiving standards. If the person with Alzheimer’s is living alone, or you as the primary caregiver have health problems, this option may need to be considered sooner rather than later. When considering your caregiving options, it’s important to consider whether you are able to balance your other obligations, either financial or to other family members. Will you be able to afford appropriate in-home coverage if you can’t continue caregiving? Talk to your loved one’s medical care team for their perspective as well. Evaluating an assisted living facility or nursing home If the best choice is to move the Alzheimer’s patient to a facility, it doesn’t mean you will no longer be involved in their care. You can still visit regularly and ensure your loved one gets the care he or she needs. Even if you are not yet ready to make that step, doing some initial legwork might save a lot of heartache in the case of a crisis where you have to move quickly. The first step is finding the right place for your loved one. Choosing a facility There are two main types of facilities that you will most likely have to evaluate for a loved one with Alzheimer’s: an assisted living facility or a nursing home. Assisted Living Assisted living is an option for those who need help with some activities of daily living. Some facilities provide minor help with medications as well. Staff is available twenty-four hours a day, but you will want to make sure they have experience handling residents with Alzheimer’s disease. Also be clear about what stage your loved may need to move to a higher level of care. Nursing homes Nursing homes provide assistance in both activities of daily living and a high level of medical care. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is almost always on the premises. Skilled nursing care providers and medical professionals such as occupational or physical therapists are also available. How do I choose a facility? Once you’ve determined the appropriate level of care, you’ll want to visit the facility—both announced and unannounced—to meet with the staff and otherwise evaluate the home. You will also want to evaluate the facility based on their experience with Alzheimer’s residents. Facilities that cater specifically for Alzheimer’s patients should have a designated area, often called a special care unit in the U.S. For residents with dementia. Questions to ask such a facility include: Policy and procedures – Does the unit mix Alzheimer’s patients with those with mental illness, which can be dangerous? Does the program require the family to supply a detailed social history of the resident (a good sign)? Environment – Is the unit clean? Is the dining area large enough for all residents to use it comfortably? Are the doors alarmed or on a delayed opening system to prevent wandering? Is the unit too noisy? Staffing – What is the ratio of residents to staff? (5 to 1 during the day, 9 to 1 at night is normal). What is staff turnover like? How do they handle meals and ensure adequate hydration, since the person can often forget to eat or drink? How do they assess unexpressed pain—if the Alzheimer’s resident has pain but cannot communicate it? Staff training – What training for Alzheimer’s care do they have? Does the facility provide staff with monthly in-service training on Alzheimer’s care? Activities – Is there an activity plan for each resident based on the person’s interests and remaining cognitive strengths? Are residents escorted outside on a daily basis? Are regular outings planned for residents? Services – Does the unit provide hospice services? What were the findings in the most recent state survey? What to expect during a transition Moving is a big adjustment both for the person with Alzheimer’s and you as their caregiver. Your loved one is moving to a new home with new faces. You are adjusting from being the person providing hands-on care to being an advocate. Remember to give yourself and the Alzheimer’s patient time to adjust. If you’re expecting to move, try to have essentials packed and ready to go, and as many administrative details taken care of as possible, as sometimes beds can come up quickly. Work closely with staff regarding your loved one’s needs and preferences. An extra familiar face during moving day, such as another relative or close friend, can also help. Each person adjusts differently to this transition. Depending on your loved one’s needs, you may either need to visit more frequently or give your loved one their own space to adjust. As the adjustment period eases, you can settle into the visiting pattern that is best for both of you. I hope this helps.

I have severe mood fluctuations and have lost interest in everything. Although I have a full time job, family, kids, I can't focus on anything properly and feel disconnected most of the time. Whatever may happen, I just don't feel happy anymore.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist
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I have severe mood fluctuations and have lost interest in everything. Although I have a full time job, family, kids, ...
Hi lybrate-user, It appears to me that you are suffering through depression, it need not have a cause or origin. It can happen to anyone with our without any reason. Feeling down or blue is a natural part of life. People let us down, things go wrong, we lose people we love or the dreams we've valued. When feeling down stretches over weeks or months, is occurring frequently and interfering with your ability to interact with people and enjoy your life, it is likely that you're experiencing some form of depression. Provided that you're able to access information and have a good doctor and support network around you, even severe depression is a highly treatable condition. Along with medication psychotherapy from psychologist is a important adjunct. Firstly, you will have to make few lifestyle changes: Sleep well. Sleep is essential to a healthy, balanced body. Lack of sleep can aggravate negative thinking and easily becomes a vicious cycle whereby your negative thoughts keep you awake and disable your ability to get enough sleep. Waking unrefreshed and feeling tired is a common complaint during depression, and even too much sleep can leave depressed persons feeling tired. Breaking this cycle requires enforcing a strict sleep routine of the same bedtime and waking time every day, avoiding caffeine and alcohol, not exercising three hours prior to bed, removing anything distracting from your bedroom, and keeping your room at a suitable temperature. Exercise releases a natural anti-depressant chemical in your brain and gets you into doing something active. Start small with a simple walk to the local store or around the block, or to your garden gate might be the way to begin. Gradually work up to a routine that fits with your needs and enjoyment. Look for friends or group exercise sessions since having a partner will keep you more motivated. You can also look for activities that will allow you to release some of the pent-up emotions that may be built up, such as kickboxing. Playing sports is a great way to get regular exercise, stay occupied, focus on self-improvement and meet new people. Some studies have found that people who participate in sports have somewhat fewer symptoms of depression. Choose a sport that is exhausting to quiet the chatter in your mind and leave you feeling wrung out—just don't overdo it. Join a team or class in your area and commit to showing up to as many of these meetings as possible, even if you may not feel like going some days. Eat healthy. Reduce your intake of sugar, high fructose corn syrup, fast foods, and processed foods. Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole foods. Drink plenty of water and do some research on foods that are said to improve your state of mind and well-being. Improving your diet can be a positive project to keep you constructively occupied and focused when you're working through your depression. Plus, many healthy foods are effective at improving mood Talk with friends, family and colleagues who make you feel good and who are good to be around. Spend time with people who see the world in a positive way and ask them to share their visions, ideas, and approaches to life with you. Most positive people will be more than happy to reveal the things that help them keep upbeat and happy about their lives. Learn from them. Remember that misery loves company. It can be incredibly hard to keep away from negative people as down and out as you're feeling, but do your best to avoid them. You won't be doing either of you a favor by confirming each other's fears that the rest of the world is terrible. Keep occupied. Being busy is a way to prevent negative thoughts from going around your head repeatedly. For depressed persons, the first step is often the hardest, so making yourself do things can be a huge difference in your day and getting you started Start a journal of your journey through your depression. Document your feelings somewhere personal and completely private. This will be the place where you let out your darkest thoughts — no holds barred — because you don't need to worry that anyone will judge you for them. A diary can become your collaborator in the struggle against your depression because it eventually provides you with great evidence of what improves your mood as well as what brings it down. Try to write in it daily if possible. Change your thinking. As part of progressing, recognizing and defeating negative thinking patterns is a very important aspect to concentrate on. Cognitive behavioral therapy, psychotherapy, or other forms of psychological therapy are helpful when you're unlearning negative thinking and establishing patterns of thinking that support your self-esteem and increase your self confidence. While it is best to read up in this area and speak with someone qualified to help guide you through the ways to change your thinking, there are some important things to keep in mind. Acknowledge the feeling will pass. This can be a very difficult step, but it's vital because it helps you to start banishing thoughts of hopelessness. List all of your good points. When you're depressed, it's easy to understate the positive things about yourself. Turn this around by listing everything that is good about you. Include achievements from the past and hopes for the future, however few or random they may seem. If you can't write this list, have a trusted friend or family member start one for you. This is a list to keep building upon as you work through your depression. Self-acceptance is a vital part of recovering from depression because you acknowledge that there are good things about yourself, but also that you have challenges to overcome. This will help you stop judging yourself more harshly than anyone else. Make decisions, however small, and act on them. Again, while this is very difficult to do during depression, it is a vital element in facing the sense of helplessness that tends to overwhelm depressed persons. Small decisions like getting out of bed, calling friends, or cleaning up the kitchen all add up. Once you act on them, they become achievements. Learn how to replace faulty or negative thinking by focusing on it. Ask questions such as: Am I assuming the worst? Am I condemning myself because something bad has happened? Am I focused on my weaknesses rather than my strengths? It is helpful to arrange the negative thought in one column and a rationalization in another column, so that you can confront and undo the negative thinking. In one column you may write the thought" I'm a failure, and in the other you challenge that thought with" I made a mistake. I've made mistakes in the past and things have turned out okay. I've also had many triumphs. Learn assertiveness techniques once you've challenged the harder aspects of your negative thinking processes. Assertive techniques will allow you to find a pathway to standing up for yourself without giving in to feelings of anger, fear, or powerlessness. Knowing how to assert yourself is an important part of not falling back into depressive patterns in the future. Remember, Always keep yourself busy, or doing something positive. Sitting alone, or thinking about all the bad events in your life without expressing them to someone is going to make your depression worsen. Also pratice yoga or meditation. All the best.
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Hi I am 30 F from South India. For the past few years I am in depression and over stressed. I am not able to concentrate in office. I am very sensitive person. I always be true to everyone. But I feel people are not the same to me. After my son was born I lost everything. My husband has not got any job. I am taking care of the family for past few years. I feel I am a suffering to my parents too, I am second pregnant now. I am in total tension thinking of my financial crisis. People at office also do not help me at all. The thing is I cannot concentrate in office now. I lost interest in everything. Sometimes I feel to die, Please help me.

PG Dip(psycosexual diseases), MBBS
Sexologist
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Hi I am 30 F from South India. For the past few years I am in depression and over stressed. I am not able to concentr...
Lybrate-user nobody life is not easy, you r too much in stress, in this world nobody has time to think about others, so do not care what other think about u, first you should have to keep your clear and simple, do not over do the things and do not expect from others, now you r pregnant if you will not be happy your unborn child will not happy and may suffer, so think about him no body else, keep your mind clear and avoid cluttering in mind, one thing you shud discuss with your he shud find out any job at any cost, you have to compel him. Rest take nutricious diet for child, 45 minutes walk with fresh air and good sleep in night. Mind it you have to compel your husband to find out some job immmedeately for the sake of your children god blesss.
4 people found this helpful

MD - Medicine
Endocrinologist
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Pain Management
Pain is a common occurrence in day to day life and should be managed well.
Remember the word ‘ICE’ which means putting ice pack on theinjured painful area, ‘C’ stands for compression and ‘E’stands for elevation.
The mantra, therefore, is to use cold compression and elevation forany injury.
Alternate hot and cold packs are used for chronic pain.
Painkillers should not be taken without a doctor’s advice.
If a painkiller has to be taken, it should be one tablet of paracetamol.
People who take alcohol should not consume paracetamol without asking their doctor.
In patients with kidney disease, even one tablet of painkiller can precipitate kidney failure.
In patients with acid peptic disease, one tablet of painkiller can precipitate gastric bleeding. Instead of taking a painkiller, look for alternative methods torelieve pain.
Pain relieving ointments are better than oral painkillers.
In hospital setting, intravenous and intramuscular injectable painkillers are available.
Always tell your doctor that you are taking painkillers.
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I usually forget things very occasionally. Yesterday I have gone with my scooty to bring snacks. It takes half an hour. So I forgot that I came with scooty and gone home by walking. And in the morning I searched for my scooty then one of my friend told that your scooty is outside. Plzzz help me m afraid because of yesterday's incident.

BHMS
Homeopath
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Acute memory loss can be due to various reason but probably it may also happen you might be occupied and absorbed in any thoughts leading to skip of things and if not this then you need to practice meditation and opt for a better sleep and regular morning walk / exercise for better oxygenation and circulation. However you need to rx kali phos 3x three tabs once daily in afternoon for a weeks time and consult back.
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My psychology doctor suggest me felis s plus 5 tablets daily once, i'm taking this tablet from last 2 years, I want to quit this but can't do so, if I stop it I feel very uncomfortable, it was given me for anxiety, is this tablet harmful to me? please suggest me how to quit this or any alternative to this?

(MRCPSYCH-UK), MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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You are also suffering from primary pulmonary hypertension. Meet your cardiologist and check if you would benefit from seldinafil citrate tablet. People with pph are known to have comorbid anxiety disorder as well. It is better to continue with the same medicine if you are benefiting from it.

Sometimes I feel anxiety for no reasons. During that period I feel uneasy to do any work. Please help me.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist
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Sometimes I feel anxiety for no reasons. During that period I feel uneasy to do any work. Please help me.
This is very common during menses and called as premenstrual syndrome or pms. This occurs because of hormonal changes and mostly temporary. If this is persistent over the period of menses then it can be cured with 3 months course of medicines.
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I am in relation with a guy since 1 n hlf year. I luv him a lot. I cnt live without him nt a single hr. He also luvs me. Bt sometimes it seems he does not. He spends tim wid me bt there is something missing. Between us. Infct most of tim when we meet we quarrel. whenever I call him he found bsy. He does not reply a single txt. He do not like when I call. He is more hppy wid his fmly n frnds nt me. sometimes it seems tht he is only wid me for intimacy. He is also my bst frnd .i share evry feeling n evry tlk wid him bt nw he irritates wid it n also me say him vry bad in anger. His behavior becomes me sad n thn he says I do not like sad girl. Be hppy if you wnt me n also make me hppy. He always scold me also on his mistakes. Nevr accept his mistake. .our relation get complicated. So will you plzz suggest me about it . Thnku .

BDS, Certification in hypnotherapy, Certification in N.L.P, Certification in Gene and behavior, Psychology at Work
Psychologist
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I am in relation with a guy since 1 n hlf year. I luv him a lot. I cnt live without him nt a single hr.
He also luvs ...
Relationship is between two individuals, who are different in there mental make-up and different demands from a relationship. May be your friend is airy and mercurial in nature who is restless and looking for change all the time. And you demand more stability, are more possessive and want more of his attention with your smaller social circle than him. Neither he will change nor you, can a middle ground be found. You must consider this before entering a formal relationship!
4 people found this helpful

(MRCPSYCH-UK), MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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Regularly solve puzzles, crosswords, quizzes, simple maths problems, logical reasonings. Regularly read journals, editorials, review articles. These mental exercises will help one increase their knowledge and prevent dementia in old age. They also boost ones confidence and prevent depression
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