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Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar Palsule  - Homeopath, Talegaon Dabhade

Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar Palsule

90 (232 ratings)
MD- Homoeopathy

Homeopath, Talegaon Dabhade

7 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic  ·  ₹200 online
Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar Palsule 90% (232 ratings) MD- Homoeopathy Homeopath, Talegaon Dabhade
7 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic  ·  ₹200 online
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar Palsule
She has over 9 years of experience as a Homeopath. She has completed MD- Homoeopathy. She has received 27 excellent feedbacks. Don?t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar-palsule on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Homeopaths in India. You will find Homeopaths with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Homeopaths online in Talegaon Dabhade. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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MD- Homoeopathy - DSHMC - 2011
Past Experience
Sr. Homoeopathic Consultant at Sanjeevani Hospital

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Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar-Palsule

Sanjeevani Hospital, 26, Laxmi Baug Vasahat, Talegaon Dabhade Talegaon Dabhade Get Directions
  4.5  (232 ratings)
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Dr. Gauri Kadlaskar-Palsule

Sanjeevani Hospital, 26, Laxmi Baug Vasahat, Talegaon DabhadeTalegaon Dabhade Get Directions
  4.5  (232 ratings)
250 at clinic
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KEEP COOL IN HOT SUMMER

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
KEEP COOL IN HOT SUMMER

Soak all the sunshine in summers with little precaution and a bit of homoeopathy. Photo: sarangib, CC0, Pixabay.com

 

KEEP COOL IN HOT SUMMER

Summers are tough times to take care of one’s health; some preventive precautions and little help from homoeopathy can help you breeze through summers while enjoying the sunshine season.

Summer is at its peak and the scorching heat has brought with it several health issues. The typical summer-related health problems from simple to sever include headache and exhaustion to sunstroke, measles and mumps. Let your physicians take care of these health issues, while you continue to enjoy the bright-sunny days with just a little bit of caution.  

Prevention is better than cure

I am sure you have heard this saying: prevention is better than cure. Why wait for the simple symptoms to turn into full blown health issues? Rather take preventive precautions to enjoy the summers.

Especially in the summers it is vital to maintain your body temperature to avoid hyperthermia; wear light-coloured, loose, cotton clothes that allow your skin to breathe.

Hydration is the key to being healthy in summers; increase your fluid intake. Enjoy cool and refreshing citrus-based sherbets, buttermilk, cold soups or seasonal fruits such as a variety of melons.

Wear the right amount of sunscreen if you are going to be in the sun for more than 2 hours  to protect yourself from sunburn.

Use a scarf or a hat to protect head and neck from harsh sun rays.

Absolutely avoid consuming outside food and water to reduce the chances of food-borne infections. Eat simple, home-cooked, fresh food.

Safe and easy, yet highly effective

Despite all the precautions, we may suffer from health issues; at such times, let me assure you that homoeopathic preparations are not only safe and easy-to-use as first aid, but they are effective for people of all ages, from children right upto elders. Let me share with you some symptoms and appropriate homoeopathic preparations to help you breeze through the summer heat.

Heat exhaustion and headache Weakness, dizziness, nausea, muscle cramps, headache and fainting due to loss of body fluids and salts and rise in body temperature. If the exposure to heat continues, it can quickly turn into an emergency medical condition commonly known as sun stroke. The patient must rest in a cool place; take salty drinks.


 

Symptoms

Homoeopathic medicine

Dose

Weakness, dizziness, nausea, muscle cramps. Immediately shift the patient away from direct heat and sun exposure.

Natrum Carbonicum 30 C

6 pills orally, every 30 minutes for 3 doses.

Severe headache

Natrum Muriaticum 30C

6 pills orally, three doses, every four hours for one day.

Patient is dizzy and dull. Take the patient to a hospital.

Gelsemium 30C

One dose, as the first aid.

 

Summer diarrhoea Loose watery stools and vomiting indicate a bacterial or viral stomach infection. The cause is usually the  consumption of contaminated food and water. Sometimes consuming juicy fruits like watermelon, immediately after exposure to sun can also lead to loose watery stools. Under such conditions, oral rehydration is a must.

 

Symptoms

Homoeopathic Medicine

Dose

Extreme watery stools with a sudden urge to pass stools. The diarrhoea is brought on by consumption of fruits after exposure to intense summer heat.

Croton Tiglium 30 C

Give 6 pills four times a day till the diarrhoea stops.

Watery stools brought associated with exhaustion.

Arsenicum Album 30 C

Give one dose of Arsenicum album and wait and watch. You can repeat a dose in 4 hours.

For summer diarrhoea associated with dehydration

Veratrum Album 30 C

6 pills every two hours till the symptoms reduce. Consult you homoeopath for further management of dehydration.

 

Summer colds Runny nose, scratchy throat, headache and cough, and occasional mild fever and bodyache. Summer colds are caused by viruses.

Symptoms

Homoeopathic medicine

Dose

Patient has a runny nose that is thin watery nasal discharge

Allium Cepa 30 C

Give 6 pills thrice a day for three days

Dry nose, nose block along with bodyache

Bryonia Alba 30C

Give 2 doses of 6 pills each for one day

For symptoms of body ache, fever, cold and headache develop at the beginning or end of summer

Dulcamara 30 C

Give 3 doses of 6 pills each for one day.

 

Pink eye or Conjunctivitis Eye complaints are very common in summers due to exposure to dust, ultraviolet (UV) rays, and dry eyes due to dry weather. Frequently wash eyes with clean water. Use UV-protection coated sunglasses. Do not share handkerchiefs or towels.

Symptoms

Homoeopathic medicine

Dose

Redness of eyes, itching and pricking sensation in the eye, along with watery discharge.

Euphrasia, eye drops and Euphrasia 30C

6 pills,thrice a day, orally

Sticky yellow discharge, severe redness

Argentum Nitricum 30C

6 pills, thrice a day, orally

 

Skin rashes and sun burns Due to prolonged exposure to the harsh UV rays, the skin tends to break into red itchy patches; if not treated, it can progress to blister formation or a sunburn.

Symptoms

Homoeopathic medicine

Dose

For itchy and dry skin

Natrum Muriaticum 200 C and Calendula lotion

6 pills twice a day for 5 days. Calendula lotion twice a day.

Sunburn or red skin besides swelling and sharp burning pain

Apis Mellifica 30C

6 pills, 2 doses of 1 hour interval

 

Urinary tract infection Lot of perspiration during summers may lead to dehydration, increasing the risk of urinary tract infections. The symptoms include burning sensation while passing urine or increased frequency and urgency for urination. It may sometimes be associated with fever and chills. Cantharis 30C 6 drops in half a litre water to be taken at regular intervals will reduce the infection immediately.

If the above symptoms continue despite the first-aid medication, or for any other symptoms and indications, please consult your family physician or visit the nearest healthcare facility.

        Reference

  1. Homoeopathic Materia Medica by Dr. William Boericke

  2. Dr. Farrington’s Clinical Materia Medica

  3. National Journal of Homoeopathy

Keep Cool In Hot Summer

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Keep Cool In Hot Summer

Keep cool in hot summer

Summers are tough times to take care of one’s health; some preventive precautions and little help from homoeopathy can help you breeze through summers while enjoying the sunshine season.

Summer is at its peak and the scorching heat has brought with it several health issues. The typical summer-related health problems from simple to sever include headache and exhaustion to sunstroke, measles and mumps. Let your physicians take care of these health issues, while you continue to enjoy the bright-sunny days with just a little bit of caution.  

Prevention is better than cure

I am sure you have heard this saying: prevention is better than cure. Why wait for the simple symptoms to turn into full blown health issues? Rather take preventive precautions to enjoy the summers.

Especially in the summers it is vital to maintain your body temperature to avoid hyperthermia; wear light-coloured, loose, cotton clothes that allow your skin to breathe.

Hydration is the key to being healthy in summers; increase your fluid intake. Enjoy cool and refreshing citrus-based sherbets, buttermilk, cold soups or seasonal fruits such as a variety of melons.

Wear the right amount of sunscreen if you are going to be in the sun for more than 2 hours  to protect yourself from sunburn.

Use a scarf or a hat to protect head and neck from harsh sun rays.

Absolutely avoid consuming outside food and water to reduce the chances of food-borne infections. Eat simple, home-cooked, fresh food.

Safe and easy, yet highly effective

Despite all the precautions, we may suffer from health issues; at such times, let me assure you that homoeopathic preparations are not only safe and easy-to-use as first aid, but they are effective for people of all ages, from children right upto elders. Let me share with you some symptoms and appropriate homoeopathic preparations to help you breeze through the summer heat.

Heat exhaustion and headache Weakness, dizziness, nausea, muscle cramps, headache and fainting due to loss of body fluids and salts and rise in body temperature. If the exposure to heat continues, it can quickly turn into an emergency medical condition commonly known as sun stroke. The patient must rest in a cool place; take salty drinks.

Summer diarrhoea  Loose watery stools and vomiting indicate a bacterial or viral stomach infection. The cause is usually the  consumption of contaminated food and water. Sometimes consuming juicy fruits like watermelon, immediately after exposure to sun can also lead to loose watery stools. Under such conditions, oral rehydration is a must.

Urinary tract infection Lot of perspiration during summers may lead to dehydration, increasing the risk of urinary tract infections. The symptoms include burning sensation while passing urine or increased frequency and urgency for urination. It may sometimes be associated with fever and chills. Cantharis 30C 6 drops in half a litre water to be taken at regular intervals will reduce the infection immediately.

If the above symptoms continue despite the first-aid medication, or for any other symptoms and indications, please consult your family physician or visit the nearest healthcare facility.

       ​​​​​​​Reference  

  1. Homoeopathic Materia Medica by Dr. William Boericke

  2. Dr. Farrington’s Clinical Materia Medica

  3. National Journal of Homoeopathy

Evolve With Your Child

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Evolve With Your Child

Evolve with your child 

To make your child a responsible person, you will have practise responsible parenting. Food habits are no exception to this rule!

Children learn by imitating the elders in the family. Just as they pick up right habits from parents, grandparents, and elder siblings and cousins, they pick up bad habits too. It is, therefore, vital that we practise responsible parenting, especially when it comes to the childhood food habits. Lessons learned or not learned at this stage of the life have lifelong implications.

Before you read any further, please understand that as an adult in the house or as a parent, you will have to work on your eating habits. After all your child will imitate you. It is crucial that you stop being a fussy eater before you can expect your child to imbibe good food habits. Stop discussing your food habits aloud at the mealtimes, and especially in front of your children. Be a great food-role-model that you can be for your child.

Don’t force food, forge love

Do not force feed your child. Please understand that it is okay for a child older than 24 months to skip meals. The child will make up for it later. As an elder in the family and as parents, you must refrain from using food as a reward or a punishment for the child. This will kick-start an unhealthy relationship with food in your child’s life.

Track sleeping habits

Poor sleeping habits may be the reason for your child’s lack of appetite. Watch your child’s sleeping habits to get to the cause of your child’s fussy eating. Try setting a healthy sleep pattern to improve the child’s appetite. A child between 2 to 3-years-old should be sleeping for about 12 hours a day, including the afternoon nap time. The number of hours of sound sleep reduces to about 8 to 9 hours a day as the child grows older.

Each child is unique, don’t compare

Always remember that your child is different and unique. Every child is different and unique, just as we all are, therefore, do not compare the number of rotis your child eats to that of another child. If your child does not like to eat a whole roti at a time, offer small finger foods that it can hold. Offer little bite-sized pieces of fruits, cheese, or parathas. Innovate for your child, and it will reward you with a clean plate and full tummy in no time.

Weigh down on weight

Yes, I know we the doctors are culprits here! In India, weight becomes a primary yardstick for a child’s health. An underweight child’s parents are often made to feel guilty, and the child is shamed. An overweight child is not a healthy child either, so please ignore all the aunts and grandmas focusing on your child’s weight. Instead, focus on other growth milestones and health markers such as activity, bowel movement, dullness, skin condition- dullness, dryness any white patches, condition of nails- whether brittle or with white patches, a child's height, frequency of falling sick etc.

Also, a sudden gain or loss in weight, recurrent infections, frequent fevers, dry or dull skin and constant irritability are a few signs that should alert you about your child’s nutrition and health overall. If you observe these symptoms in your child, consult the family physician or a paediatrician.

Respect child’s ‘privacy’

Just as you and I would not like to discuss our problems and shortcomings in public, do not discuss your child’s food issues with each and everyone; especially in front of the child. Instead, focus on encouraging your child to try new foods, and respond positively when the child does so. Always focus on the positives of the food habits of your child, and work to strengthen them. For example, if your child does not like spinach, but eats all other vegetables, focus on what the child likes than taunting it for not liking the spinach. We all have our likes and dislikes after all.

Being a parent, I know one thing: my child made me a parent. Moreover, as I am growing with my child, I am learning new things, not only about my child but myself. Food habits are one of them. Believe you me, evolving my food habits with my child; I am learning to be a better parent. It is making me a better person, and perhaps, a better doctor.

A Fun-Tastic Bond with Food

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
A Fun-Tastic Bond with Food

A Fun-Tastic Bond with Food

Quite contrary to popular belief, children between 2 and 12 years of age do not require much nutrition as the growth rate is the lowest. Your child will explore as much as you will encourage, so these are testing times for both – children as well as parents.

The second phase of childhood life, as far as nutrition is concerned, includes toddlers, preschoolers and young school-going children – the children between the age of 2 years and 12 years years. Your child, unlike the early days of infancy and adolescence, does not grow rapidly; there are occasional growth spurts this phase of your child’s life is not as nutritionally demanding as the other two phases.

Heredity plays a vital role in the growth of your child. However, your child must receive optimum nutritional support to ensure they reach their potential to grow physically and mentally. This nutritional phase plays a vital role in your child's growth so pay close attention to what you are going to read hereafter. 

Keep up with your child’s nutritional needs

Children in this are typically very active. They run. They play. They follow you. They explore things around them. They are, therefore, in need of a constant supply of energy. They require a balanced diet with four to five mid-sized meals a day instead of three large meals like we adults prefer. Your child in this age group also needs Vitamin C, and A. One serving of citrus fruits, tomatoes, guava will meet the requirement for Vitamin C and carrots, papaya, sweet potatoes, and leafy greens such as spinach will serve your child Vitamin A that it will need. https://m.tarladalal.com/Orange-Grapefruit-and-Mint-Salad-365r

Let the meals be a fun activity

Beginning when the child learns to sit upright and walk, the child can pick things up and put it in the mouth. That's where you should start allowing the child to self-feed, and by the age of two years, your child should be able to self-feed. It will be messy in the beginning – fruit juices and pieces of food dribbling from the mouth, hands and arms covered in food and your child trying to eat off the plate.

Allow your child to participate in the journey of its food – take your child to the market for shopping of food items; let them help you in preparing the food at home, and make the process fun for your child. Children love to make dough balls, help mash potatoes, or knead the dough. Be a sport and let the child develop a relationship with its food. Your child will develop likes and dislikes, but support your child in choosing at least one food item from each group, every day. Feeding the child should be fun and not a chore for your child and you or its caretaker. 

Your child is turning into a ‘person’

Your children in this age group may not want to eat all the time; however, they may want to eat wrong food all the time. Fussy eating creeps into our lives at this age. It is therefore essential to help your child make a choice and a healthy choice at that. Present your child a variety of healthy food options and let your child choose. The key here is presenting healthy food options and not what you think is right for the child. For example, let the child choose between dry fruits and fruits and a sugar candy.

Remember, the food at home should be in keeping with your tradition and culture. It is essential to experiment while staying relevant. Cook and serve home-cooked, locally available, fresh and colourful food to your child. It is best to make food appealing to the child – different colours, textures, and a bit of surprise too will help in keeping your child engaged at the mealtimes. Try smaller Frankie rolls  instead of serving roti and sabzee on the side, or kheer with natural sweeteners such as fruit pulps instead of sugar, for example. Or make salad balls with small portions of salads wrapped in green leaves – blanched spinach wrapping warm, peas-tomato-carrot salad. Your child will enjoy eating such foods.

You will not need any form of nutrition-supplements if your child eats a balanced diet daily. Remember, it is your responsibility to give your child a balanced diet. If your child builds a positive and fun-filled bond with food, it will eat a balanced diet and learn to make healthy food choices early in life.

Food for Budding Buds

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Food for Budding Buds

Food for Budding buds

After growing exclusively on mother’s milk for the first six months, your baby is ready to taste the food you eat. Albeit, the food needs to be ‘baby-friendly’!

With regards to nutrition, we can divide our life into four stages: infancy, childhood, adolescence and  adulthood. It is necessary to treat the diet of a child separately from the adults because although the nutritional needs of children are similar to those of adults they differ in terms of quantity, the type of food required to match the growth of the child, and the food that are suitable for the digestive capacities of the child.

Children’s food isn’t special, it needs special attention

For the first six months in the world, your baby needs nothing more than the mother's milk to take care of all its food and water needs. It is sufficient to take care of the baby's energy, nutritional and immunity needs. Fortified foods or supplements are not required in the first six months unless your baby is born prematurely or you observe any deficiencies in the baby.

After the first six months, however, deficit is observed between the nutrition provided by the breast-milk and the baby’s requirement nutrition considering the rapid growth.

The correct age for the introduction of any food other than breast-milk is after the baby has completed six months; until then the intestines of the babies are not developed enough to assimilate semi-solid or solid foods. Waiting until the baby completes six months of age thus reduces the chances of infection that may occur earlier due to underdeveloped digestive systems.

Complement the breast-milk, not replace it

Especially the first-time parents receive plenty of advice from the elders in the family about weaning foods. Take the advice with a pinch of salt and focus on what your baby needs for a healthy start in the tasty world of food. Please understand that the food given after the six months of age is supposed to complement the breast milk and not replace it. That’s why it is called complementary feed.

Pack nutrition, not just fill the tummy

Just like us, the adults, the taste, the consistency and the texture of the food play an essential role in complementary feeding. The food must be tasty but also mashed to a thick consistency. Such food is easy to feed, as it stays in the spoon. It also effectively packs more nutrition than the thin food. The thin food just fills baby’s tiny tummy, not delivering much nutrition leaving baby hungry in some time. Thick foods help in addressing the crucial nutritional gap between the breast-milk and baby’s requirement.

Keep an eye on your child’s development and well-being. If your child is often tired or loses weight, or often falls sick, then please consult your doctor.

A well-cooked khichadi composed of three parts rice, one part dal, and half part vegetables well cooked in water and served with one tspn ghee is an adequate complementary food for across India.

Experiment, but stay relevant

As the baby gets used to the soft and mashed food, experiment with different tastes. Gradually introduce the baby to different textures – a grainy porridge  made from rice or ragi or smaller  pieces of well-ripened fruits such as mashed banana, skinned grapes, orange segments, guava etc.

Staying away from commercially available foods is important. The complementary food must be culturally acceptable, affordable and locally available, and prepared at home for the best results. The food must be easily digestible by the baby's smaller digestive system.

Tricks to tackle the teething tantrums

Nobody accepts change and new things readily, the babies are no exception. Introduce only one new food item, in small quantities, and preferably in the morning meals. Introduce new foods when your baby is the hungriest. The real key to developing baby's taste-acceptance is how patiently you introduce different foods to the baby at this early age. Patience is the key to success; be gentle but don't give up.

Don't force newer foods on your baby. Follow your baby's hunger signals and food preferences; just like us, the babies genuinely don't like or detest specific food items. Respect baby's choice while you add a variety of foods and structure mealtimes for your baby.

The following chart will offer you some guideline for preparing meal plans for your baby.

Age

Foods

Frequency

Quantity

Six months

Soft porridge, khichadi, dalia

Twice a day

2-3 tablespoons

7-8 months

Well-mashed potatoes, mashed red pumpkin, dalia and khichadi

Thrice a day

¾th of a big cup or xx gram/millilitre  

9-11 months

Finely chopped or mashed food, pureed spinach, clear vegetable soup. An egg can be introduced at 11 months. Foods that the baby can easily pick up.

Three meals a day, and a snack in-between

A full 200 ml cup for every mealtime

12-24 months

Everything that has been cooked for the family, chopped finely or mashed, if needed.

Three meals a day, and two snacks in-between

A full 250 ml cup for every mealtime

Eat Well to Feed Well

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Eat Well to Feed Well

Eat Well to Feed Well

Our food-journey begins with the magical moment of conception in the mother's womb; it is, therefore, important for the expectant, lactating and new mothers to consume nutrition-rich diet to be able to feed their baby well.

Food is a critical aspect of one's journey in this world as a living being, from conception through life to death. Malnutrition, at any stage of life, can result in stunted growth, increased disease susceptibility, and even childhood obesity. Severe or prolonged malnourishment can have serious long-term effects on the mother and child’s health.

Expectant or breastfeeding mothers receive a lot of nutritional and dietary advice from people around them. More often than not, the information is contradictory and somewhat scary. Some advise you to eat a particular kind of food to produce enough milk for the baby, while some warn that some foods will make the baby refuse your milk. A few remind you about a specific type of diet that can be harmful to your baby or reduce your milk production. What is the best advice for you then?

Work on your not-so-desirable habits

The moment you conceive, it is advisable that you start working on your not-so-good-for-child habits. Avoid smoking and excessive consumption of alcohol and caffeine-based drinks. When you are breastfeeding your child, caffeine-based beverages, aerated drinks, and alcohol is best avoided from your diet.

When you win over the things to be entirely avoided, focus on the diet that you need as a mother and nutrition-provider. Remember, the balanced diet that you need as a mother is neither complicated nor expensive.

Make protein a part of your daily diet

As a nursing mother, you require an extra 25 grams of protein compared to the 50 to 65 gms needed for any woman your age. The additional need for protein can be easily met by adding a Katori ( about 150 gms) of think daal or a Katori of sprouts in your daily diet. You can also increase the intake of dairy products such as milk or yoghurt. If you can, consider adding an egg to your diet. Protein-rich vegetarian sources also include soy-products, nuts and seeds. For mothers who include non vegetarian foods in their diet eggs and chicken are the best options. But make sure they are cooked with very little oil and spices. 1 boiled egg or one piece of grilled or boiled chicken of about 80 gms is sufficient.

Mind your minerals

The minerals help with the smooth functioning of our body-functions and help keep our body healthy: they make our bones strong, absorb oxygen in the blood, nerve development and functioning, and lot more. Minerals are not just essential; they are critical to our being.

During lactation, you must focus on Calcium and iron. Calcium can be easily derived from milk: about two glasses of milk (200 ml) a day will meet your requirement. Other Calcium-rich sources include curry leaves, finger millet (ragi or nachani as we know it). Iron is not secreted into the breast-milk, so the requirement during the lactating period is not any different from the pregnancy. One can meet the need for Iron from dates, peanuts, organic jaggery, leafy-green vegetables such as spinach, and eggs.

Vitamins and Minerals go hand-in-hand

For minerals to work optimally for our body, often they need support from Vitamins. Vitamin B12 supports iron-carrying capacity of blood.Vitamin D is required for the absorption of calcium and phosphorus. Your baby needs all the minerals and vitamins, and for the first, critical years of development, the baby receives them exclusively through you.

B12 is almost exclusively found in animal products (eggs, meat, milk, for example) so it is difficult to get enough B12 through a vegetarian diet. Consider supplements because B12 is essential for your baby's brain development. Similarly, a Vitamin D deficiency in mother's body results in deficiencies in the breast-milk, and in turn, affects the baby's calcium and phosphorus absorption. Severe deficiency of Vitamin D can cause rickets, and soften and weakening of bones in your baby and you. Consult your physician or paediatrician to check if you or your baby need Vitamin D supplements.

Just like you must consume and check certain things to ensure the best interests of your baby, you must watch Vitamin C levels for your health. Especially during pregnancy and lactation period, your body needs Vitamin C to recover from the wear and tear. Eat a lot of Vitamin C-rich fruits like oranges, sweet lime, guava and our humble lemon. Ensure the fruits are ripe and avoid specific fruits if you are allergic to them. Also remember, Vitamin C is most volatile and responds adversely to heat. For example, for best benefits, squeeze lemon on the food on your plate, not while it is cooking away. Alternatively, eat fruits immediately after cutting them, don't store them open for long.

Goodness of Galactagogue

Galactagogues are the foods that induce, augment or maintain lactation. The most popular among them is fenugreek; the active ingredient found in fenugreek increases lactation. Rich in fibre, it prevents digestive problems for the mother. Methi laddus (http://nishamadhulika.com/en/498-methi-laddu-recipe.html) are a famous recipe for new mothers. Alfalfa is a highly nutritive plant, rich in essential Vitamins like A and E, and minerals such as Calcium, and Phosphorus. Milk thistle or Bhat kataiya has good anti bacterial, anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory properties. Its stalks and flowers can be added to daily salads. It is also available in the form of tea packets for the lovers of green tea. Asparagus racemosus or Shatavari a known uterine tonic and a galactagogue. Available in the form of granules it can be easily added to warm milk or tea. Garden cress seeds or Aliv or Halim are rich in Calcium and Vitamin C and a natural galactagogue. They can be roasted and consumed along with milk or in form of laddus.

Before I close this blog entry, I will advise to watch your water and fluid intake as a mother. Water and juices help to hydrate your body and also provide the fluid to produce milk for your baby. Never dehydrate yourself.

Evolve With Your Child

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Evolve With Your Child

Evolve with your child

To make your child a responsible person, you will have practise responsible parenting. Food habits are no exception to this rule!

Children learn by imitating the elders in the family. Just as they pick up right habits from parents, grandparents, and elder siblings and cousins, they pick up bad habits too. It is, therefore, vital that we practise responsible parenting, especially when it comes to the childhood food habits. Lessons learned or not learned at this stage of the life have lifelong implications.

Before you read any further, please understand that as an adult in the house or as a parent, you will have to work on your eating habits. After all your child will imitate you. It is crucial that you stop being a fussy eater before you can expect your child to imbibe good food habits. Stop discussing your food habits aloud at the mealtimes, and especially in front of your children. Be a great food-role-model that you can be for your child.

Don’t force food, forge love

Do not force feed your child. Please understand that it is okay for a child older than 24 months to skip meals. The child will make up for it later. As an elder in the family and as parents, you must refrain from using food as a reward or a punishment for the child. This will kick-start an unhealthy relationship with food in your child’s life.

Track sleeping habits

Poor sleeping habits may be the reason for your child’s lack of appetite. Watch your child’s sleeping habits to get to the cause of your child’s fussy eating. Try setting a healthy sleep pattern to improve the child’s appetite. A child between 2 to 3-years-old should be sleeping for about 12 hours a day, including the afternoon nap time. The number of hours of sound sleep reduces to about 8 to 9 hours a day as the child grows older.

Each child is unique, don’t compare

Always remember that your child is different and unique. Every child is different and unique, just as we all are, therefore, do not compare the number of rotis your child eats to that of another child. If your child does not like to eat a whole roti at a time, offer small finger foods that it can hold. Offer little bite-sized pieces of fruits, cheese, or parathas. Innovate for your child, and it will reward you with a clean plate and full tummy in no time.

Weigh down on weight

Yes, I know we the doctors are culprits here! In India, weight becomes a primary yardstick for a child’s health. An underweight child’s parents are often made to feel guilty, and the child is shamed. An overweight child is not a healthy child either, so please ignore all the aunts and grandmas focusing on your child’s weight. Instead, focus on other growth milestones and health markers such as activity, bowel movement, dullness, skin condition- dullness, dryness any white patches, condition of nails- whether brittle or with white patches, a child's height, frequency of falling sick etc.

Also, a sudden gain or loss in weight, recurrent infections, frequent fevers, dry or dull skin and constant irritability are a few signs that should alert you about your child’s nutrition and health overall. If you observe these symptoms in your child, consult the family physician or a paediatrician.

Respect child’s ‘privacy’

Just as you and I would not like to discuss our problems and shortcomings in public, do not discuss your child’s food issues with each and everyone; especially in front of the child. Instead, focus on encouraging your child to try new foods, and respond positively when the child does so. Always focus on the positives of the food habits of your child, and work to strengthen them. For example, if your child does not like spinach, but eats all other vegetables, focus on what the child likes than taunting it for not liking the spinach. We all have our likes and dislikes after all.

Being a parent, I know one thing: my child made me a parent. Moreover, as I am growing with my child, I am learning new things, not only about my child but myself. Food habits are one of them. Believe you me, evolving my food habits with my child; I am learning to be a better parent. It is making me a better person, and perhaps, a better doctor.

So when do you plan to start your food journey with your child?

A Funtastic Bond With Food

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
A Funtastic Bond With Food

A fun-tastic bond with food

Quite contrary to popular belief, children between 2 and 12 years of age do not require much nutrition as the growth rate is the lowest. Your child will explore as much as you will encourage, so these are testing times for both – children as well as parents.

The second phase of childhood life, as far as nutrition is concerned, includes toddlers, preschoolers and young school-going children – the children between the age of 2 years and 12 years years. Your child, unlike the early days of infancy and adolescence, does not grow rapidly; there are occasional growth spurts this phase of your child’s life is not as nutritionally demanding as the other two phases.

Heredity plays a vital role in the growth of your child. However, your child must receive optimum nutritional support to ensure they reach their potential to grow physically and mentally. This nutritional phase plays a vital role in your child's growth so pay close attention to what you are going to read hereafter. 


Keep up with your child’s nutritional needs

Children in this are typically very active. They run. They play. They follow you. They explore things around them. They are, therefore, in need of a constant supply of energy. They require a balanced diet with four to five mid-sized meals a day instead of three large meals like we adults prefer. Your child in this age group also needs vitamin c, and a. One serving of citrus fruits, tomatoes, guava will meet the requirement for vitamin c and carrots, papaya, sweet potatoes, and leafy greens such as spinach will serve your child vitamin a that it will need.

Let the meals be a fun activity

Beginning when the child learns to sit upright and walk, the child can pick things up and put it in the mouth. That's where you should start allowing the child to self-feed, and by the age of two years, your child should be able to self-feed. It will be messy in the beginning – fruit juices and pieces of food dribbling from the mouth, hands and arms covered in food and your child trying to eat off the plate.

Allow your child to participate in the journey of its food – take your child to the market for shopping of food items; let them help you in preparing the food at home, and make the process fun for your child. Children love to make dough balls, help mash potatoes, or knead the dough. Be a sport and let the child develop a relationship with its food. Your child will develop likes and dislikes, but support your child in choosing at least one food item from each group, every day. Feeding the child should be fun and not a chore for your child and you or its caretaker. 

Your child is turning into a ‘person’

Your children in this age group may not want to eat all the time; however, they may want to eat wrong food all the time. Fussy eating creeps into our lives at this age. It is therefore essential to help your child make a choice and a healthy choice at that. Present your child a variety of healthy food options and let your child choose. The key here is presenting healthy food options and not what you think is right for the child. For example, let the child choose between dry fruits and fruits and a sugar candy.

Remember, the food at home should be in keeping with your tradition and culture. It is essential to experiment while staying relevant. Cook and serve home-cooked, locally available, fresh and colourful food to your child. It is best to make food appealing to the child – different colours, textures, and a bit of surprise too will help in keeping your child engaged at the mealtimes. Try smaller frankie rolls instead of serving roti and sabzee on the side, or kheer with natural sweeteners such as fruit pulps instead of sugar, for example. Or make salad balls with small portions of salads wrapped in green leaves – blanched spinach wrapping warm, peas-tomato-carrot salad. Your child will enjoy eating such foods.

You will not need any form of nutrition-supplements if your child eats a balanced diet daily. Remember, it is your responsibility to give your child a balanced diet. If your child builds a positive and fun-filled bond with food, it will eat a balanced diet and learn to make healthy food choices early in life.

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Food for Budding buds

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Food for Budding buds

 

Food for Budding buds

After growing exclusively on mother’s milk for the first six months, your baby is ready to taste the food you eat. Albeit, the food needs to be ‘baby-friendly’!

With regards to nutrition, we can divide our life into four stages: infancy, childhood, adolescence and  adulthood. It is necessary to treat the diet of a child separately from the adults because although the nutritional needs of children are similar to those of adults they differ in terms of quantity, the type of food required to match the growth of the child, and the food that are suitable for the digestive capacities of the child.

Children’s food isn’t special, it needs special attention

For the first six months in the world, your baby needs nothing more than the mother's milk to take care of all its food and water needs. It is sufficient to take care of the baby's energy, nutritional and immunity needs. Fortified foods or supplements are not required in the first six months unless your baby is born prematurely or you observe any deficiencies in the baby.

After the first six months, however, deficit is observed between the nutrition provided by the breast-milk and the baby’s requirement nutrition considering the rapid growth.

The correct age for the introduction of any food other than breast-milk is after the baby has completed six months; until then the intestines of the babies are not developed enough to assimilate semi-solid or solid foods. Waiting until the baby completes six months of age thus reduces the chances of infection that may occur earlier due to underdeveloped digestive systems.

Complement the breast-milk, not replace it

Especially the first-time parents receive plenty of advice from the elders in the family about weaning foods. Take the advice with a pinch of salt and focus on what your baby needs for a healthy start in the tasty world of food. Please understand that the food given after the six months of age is supposed to complement the breast milk and not replace it. That’s why it is called complementary feed.

Pack nutrition, not just fill the tummy

Just like us, the adults, the taste, the consistency and the texture of the food play an essential role in complementary feeding. The food must be tasty but also mashed to a thick consistency. Such food is easy to feed, as it stays in the spoon. It also effectively packs more nutrition than the thin food. The thin food just fills baby’s tiny tummy, not delivering much nutrition leaving baby hungry in some time. Thick foods help in addressing the crucial nutritional gap between the breast-milk and baby’s requirement.

Keep an eye on your child’s development and well-being. If your child is often tired or loses weight, or often falls sick, then please consult your doctor.

A well-cooked khichadi composed of three parts rice, one part dal, and half part vegetables well cooked in water and served with one tspn ghee is an adequate complementary food for across India.  https://m.tarladalal.com/Moong-Dal-Khichdi-(-Baby-and-Toddler)-3049r

Experiment, but stay relevant

As the baby gets used to the soft and mashed food, experiment with different tastes. Gradually introduce the baby to different textures – a grainy porridge  made from rice or rag ihttps://m.tarladalal.com/Jowar-Ragi-and-Date-Porridge--(-Baby-and-Toddler)-38841r or smaller  pieces of well-ripened fruits such as mashed banana, skinned grapes, orange segments, guava etc.

Staying away from commercially available foods is important. The complementary food must be culturally acceptable, affordable and locally available, and prepared at home for the best results. The food must be easily digestible by the baby's smaller digestive system.

Tricks to tackle the teething tantrums

Nobody accepts change and new things readily, the babies are no exception. Introduce only one new food item, in small quantities, and preferably in the morning meals. Introduce new foods when your baby is the hungriest. The real key to developing baby's taste-acceptance is how patiently you introduce different foods to the baby at this early age. Patience is the key to success; be gentle but don't give up.

Don't force newer foods on your baby. Follow your baby's hunger signals and food preferences; just like us, the babies genuinely don't like or detest specific food items. Respect baby's choice while you add a variety of foods and structure mealtimes for your baby.

The following chart will offer you some guideline for preparing meal plans for your baby.

Age

Foods

Frequency

Quantity

Six months

Soft porridge, khichadi, dalia

Twice a day

2-3 tablespoons

7-8 months

Well-mashed potatoes, mashed red pumpkin, dalia and khichadi

Thrice a day

¾th of a big cup or xx gram/millilitre  

9-11 months

Finely chopped or mashed food, pureed spinach, clear vegetable soup. An egg can be introduced at 11 months. Foods that the baby can easily pick up.

Three meals a day, and a snack in-between

A full 200 ml cup for every mealtime

12-24 months

Everything that has been cooked for the family, chopped finely or mashed, if needed.

Three meals a day, and two snacks in-between

A full 250 ml cup for every mealtime

 

Reference

Essential Paediatrics by Dr O.P. Ghai

ICMR Dietary Guideline for Indians A Manual

Aai Me Kay Khau by Dr. Sunil Godbole http://www.menakabooks.com/gajanan-book-depot/7810-aai-mee-kay-khau-dr-sunil-godbole-dr-ashwini-godbole-gajanan-book-depot-buy-online.html?nosto=nosto-page-product2

Eat Well to Feed Well

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
Eat Well to Feed Well

Eat Well to Feed Well

Our food-journey begins with the magical moment of conception in the mother's womb; it is, therefore, important for the expectant, lactating and new mothers to consume nutrition-rich diet to be able to feed their baby well.

Food is a critical aspect of one's journey in this world as a living being, from conception through life to death. Malnutrition, at any stage of life, can result in stunted growth, increased disease susceptibility, and even childhood obesity. Severe or prolonged malnourishment can have serious long-term effects on the mother and child’s health.

Expectant or breastfeeding mothers receive a lot of nutritional and dietary advice from people around them. More often than not, the information is contradictory and somewhat scary. Some advise you to eat a particular kind of food to produce enough milk for the baby, while some warn that some foods will make the baby refuse your milk. A few remind you about a specific type of diet that can be harmful to your baby or reduce your milk production. What is the best advice for you then?

Work on your not-so-desirable habits

The moment you conceive, it is advisable that you start working on your not-so-good-for-child habits. Avoid smoking and excessive consumption of alcohol and caffeine-based drinks. When you are breastfeeding your child, caffeine-based beverages, aerated drinks, and alcohol is best avoided from your diet.

When you win over the things to be entirely avoided, focus on the diet that you need as a mother and nutrition-provider. Remember, the balanced diet that you need as a mother is neither complicated nor expensive.

Make protein a part of your daily diet

As a nursing mother, you require an extra 25 grams of protein compared to the 50 to 65 gms needed for any woman your age. The additional need for protein can be easily met by adding a Katori ( about 150 gms) of think daal or a Katori of sprouts in your daily diet. You can also increase the intake of dairy products such as milk or yoghurt. If you can, consider adding an egg to your diet. Protein-rich vegetarian sources also include soy-products, nuts and seeds. For mothers who include non vegetarian foods in their diet eggs and chicken are the best options. But make sure they are cooked with very little oil and spices. 1 boiled egg or one piece of grilled or boiled chicken of about 80 gms is sufficient.

Mind your minerals

The minerals help with the smooth functioning of our body-functions and help keep our body healthy: they make our bones strong, absorb oxygen in the blood, nerve development and functioning, and lot more. Minerals are not just essential; they are critical to our being.

During lactation, you must focus on Calcium and iron. Calcium can be easily derived from milk: about two glasses of milk (200 ml) a day will meet your requirement. Other Calcium-rich sources include curry leaves, finger millet (ragi or nachani as we know it). Iron is not secreted into the breast-milk, so the requirement during the lactating period is not any different from the pregnancy. One can meet the need for Iron from dates, peanuts, organic jaggery, leafy-green vegetables such as spinach, and eggs.

Vitamins and Minerals go hand-in-hand

For minerals to work optimally for our body, often they need support from Vitamins. Vitamin B12 supports iron-carrying capacity of blood.Vitamin D is required for the absorption of calcium and phosphorus. Your baby needs all the minerals and vitamins, and for the first, critical years of development, the baby receives them exclusively through you.

B12 is almost exclusively found in animal products (eggs, meat, milk, for example) so it is difficult to get enough B12 through a vegetarian diet. Consider supplements because B12 is essential for your baby's brain development. Similarly, a Vitamin D deficiency in mother's body results in deficiencies in the breast-milk, and in turn, affects the baby's calcium and phosphorus absorption. Severe deficiency of Vitamin D can cause rickets, and soften and weakening of bones in your baby and you. Consult your physician or paediatrician to check if you or your baby need Vitamin D supplements.

Just like you must consume and check certain things to ensure the best interests of your baby, you must watch Vitamin C levels for your health. Especially during pregnancy and lactation period, your body needs Vitamin C to recover from the wear and tear. Eat a lot of Vitamin C-rich fruits like oranges, sweet lime, guava and our humble lemon. Ensure the fruits are ripe and avoid specific fruits if you are allergic to them. Also remember, Vitamin C is most volatile and responds adversely to heat. For example, for best benefits, squeeze lemon on the food on your plate, not while it is cooking away. Alternatively, eat fruits immediately after cutting them, don't store them open for long.

Goodness of Galactagogue

Galactagogues are the foods that induce, augment or maintain lactation. The most popular among them is fenugreek; the active ingredient found in fenugreek increases lactation. Rich in fibre, it prevents digestive problems for the mother. Methi laddus are a famous recipe for new mothers. Alfalfa is a highly nutritive plant, rich in essential Vitamins like A and E, and minerals such as Calcium, and Phosphorus. Milk thistle or Bhat kataiya has good anti bacterial, anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory properties. Its stalks and flowers can be added to daily salads. It is also available in the form of tea packets for the lovers of green tea. Asparagus racemosus or Shatavari a known uterine tonic and a galactagogue. Available in the form of granules it can be easily added to warm milk or tea. Garden cress seeds or Aliv or Halim are rich in Calcium and Vitamin C and a natural galactagogue. They can be roasted and consumed along with milk or in form of laddus.

Before I close this blog entry, I will advise to watch your water and fluid intake as a mother. Water and juices help to hydrate your body and also provide the fluid to produce milk for your baby. Never dehydrate yourself.

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