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Smilex Speciality dental care

Dental Clinic

Damodaar Villa, oppt Kathrud bus stand, Karve road, Landmark - Behind Kasthuri masthani(cool drink shop), Pune Pune
1 Doctor
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Smilex Speciality dental care Dental Clinic Damodaar Villa, oppt Kathrud bus stand, Karve road, Landmark - Behind Kasthuri masthani(cool drink shop), Pune Pune
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We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you deserve....more
We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you deserve.
More about Smilex Speciality dental care
Smilex Speciality dental care is known for housing experienced Dentists. Dr. K.N. Chauhan, a well-reputed Dentist, practices in Pune. Visit this medical health centre for Dentists recommended by 96 patients.

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MON-SUN
08:00 AM - 09:00 PM

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Damodaar Villa, oppt Kathrud bus stand, Karve road, Landmark - Behind Kasthuri masthani(cool drink shop), Pune
Karve Road Pune, Maharashtra
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How to Treat Diastema?

BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
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Diastema (Gap Between Teeth)

Dental Pain: What Is It?

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Dental Pain: What Is It?

Dental pain is an especially difficult situation to handle on your own. True dental pain usually doesn’t respond to common over the counter pain control options. Let’s go over the different types of dental pain, what you can expect with each, and what you can do temporarily in each case.

Toothache (Severe Constant Throbbing, Hot and Cold Sensitivity)

Dentists call this type of toothache “irreversible pulpitis”. The nerve of the tooth has been traumatized and is in the process of dying. While this lasts you’ll have severe throbbing pain as well as pain from hot and cold. Many times the pain is enough to wake you up at night. I’ve had many patients tell me that it is worse than giving birth or having kidney stones. There are very few things you can do to help with this type of pain because of it’s severity. 800 mg of Ibuprofen every 6 hours will sometimes take the edge off. Anesthetic gels or crushed aspirin tablet around the tooth will be ineffective. The only solutions to this problem are to wait for it to go away, have the tooth extracted, or have a root canal. If you decide to wait it out, you should realize that the tooth will likely become infected at some point in the future.

Toothache (Severe constant pain especially if any pressure is placed on the tooth, No hot and cold sensitivity)

Once the nerve of the tooth has died, the area inside the tooth becomes infected. This infection will often spread out of the tooth and into the bone around the tooth. This is known as a dental abscess. You won’t have any sensitivity to temperature in this case but you can still have severe throbbing pain and pain when you bite or anything touches the tooth. You can use 800 mg of Ibuprofen every 6 hours to take the edge off. Again any anesthetic gel or similar preparation around the tooth will not help. Antibiotics will help in this case to reduce the infection and relieve some of the pain temporarily. The pain will come back at some point in the future. The only permanent options for treatment are to take the tooth out or do a root canal.

Toothache (Pain only when biting)

If you have pain on biting after having fillings done, your bite is usually a little bit high (called a 'high-point') and needs to be adjusted by the dentist. Avoid biting on that area as best you can until you can get it adjusted. If you haven’t had any dental work done recently, this can be the result of a crack developing in the tooth. The best thing to do is avoid chewing on the tooth until you can see the dentist. Most of these teeth end up needing a crown and occasionally need a root canal if the crack goes into the nerve.

Mouth Ulcer

Ulcers in your mouth can mimic the pain from the a toothache. These can develop all on their own or sometimes they are the result of biting your lip or cheek. If you see a roundish white area surrounded by a bright red halo, you likely have an ulcer. Any over-the-couter available anesthetic gel (e.g. Mucopain, Hexigel, Soregel) placed on the ulcer will help numb it and reduce the pain. Most of these will heal on their own within a week.

Sinus Pain

Sinus pain is another one of those situations that can mimic a toothache. The roots of your top molars literally sit right next to your sinuses and any type of sinus pressure from a cold, etc can cause your teeth to ache. You’ll usually feel a minor to moderate constant ache in those areas. One of the best tests of this is to bend your head and upper body down towards your feet and then straighten up suddenly. If this causes additional pain it is usually sinus related. Decongestants like Otrivin will help relieve some of this pain.

TMJ Pain

Lastly, many people develop TMJ pain. The Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)  is the joint that connects your jaw to your skull. When this joint is injured or damaged, it can lead to a localized pain disorder called Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome. Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) syndrome often responds to home remedies, including ice packs to the joint, over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), massage or gentle stretches of the jaw and neck, and stress reduction. The prognosis for TMJ syndrome is generally good as the disorder can usually be managed with self-care and home remedies. If it doesn't respond to any medication, you must see your Dentist for further care.

Tooth Sensitivity: What Is It?

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Tooth Sensitivity: What Is It?

If you have experienced sharp pain when you eat/drink hot, cold, sweet and sour food/drinks, or when you brush/floss your teeth, you may be suffering from tooth sensitivity provided that you do not have oral problems such as tooth decay. Even if you do not have any sensitive teeth, you are encouraged to read this article to prevent it.

What is Tooth Sensitivity? Tooth sensitivity is mainly caused by exposure of dentine (innermost layer) of the tooth to the oral environment. The dentine has numerous fine tubules which connect to the pulp. When the nerve endings in the pulp are irritated by external stimulus, sharp pain is felt.

The outermost layer of the crown is enamel. If the enamel has been damaged, the dentine will not be protected. The dentine of the root of a tooth is covered by the gum. If there is gum recession, the dentine of the root will be exposed.

Dentine Exposure is caused by:

1. Using a toothbrush with hard bristles

2. Brushing the teeth with excessive force or incorrect brushing technique, leading to gum recession and abrasion of the root surface 

3. Periodontal disease, resulting from gum recession and exposure of root surfaces

4. Acid erosion of enamel due to frequent intake of highly acidic food or drinks.

5. Habitual teeth grinding which wears off the enamel

Management of tooth sensitivity

1. Consult the dentist and learn the correct tooth brushing technique to prevent further abrasion of root surfaces.

2. Use desensitizing toothpaste to relieve tooth sensitivity. Please consult your dentist before purchasing or using desensitizing toothpaste.

3. If dentine has been exposed, the dentist can apply topical fluoride or put a filling over the exposed surface to reduce the sensitivity.

4. If you habitually grind your teeth, the dentist may fabricate a “night guard” for you to wear over the teeth to prevent continual attrition of teeth.

5. Other than tooth sensitivity, dental problems such as tooth decay, gum disease and cracked tooth may also lead to toothache. Therefore, if you have a toothache, please consult your dentist to find out the reasons behind it.

When I eat any type of meats e.g. Chicken or mutton, my teeth get tremendous pain all day long, what should be done?

BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
When I eat any type of meats e.g. Chicken or mutton, my teeth get tremendous pain all day long, what should be done?
Hello user, You need to visit a dentist and get an x ray done for the teeth. There may be some problems with gums or teeth itself. Wish you good health and happiness Keep me updated with the improvements Regards.
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I have tooth ache it is molar tooth it pains when I eat something can I have any remedies for that.

BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
I have tooth ache it is molar tooth it pains when I eat something can I have any remedies for that.
Hello user, Yes, remedies are available but they are not permanent solution to your pain. Use clove oil or burn a clove and put it near or upon the tooth. Rinse mouth with salt water and turmeric mixture twice a day. For permanent treatment visit a dentist and get an x ray done for the tooth. Wish you good health and happiness Keep me updated with the improvements Regards.
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I am suffering from bad breath sometimes. Please suggest same good herbal medicines.

BDS, MDS - Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Advanced course in maxillofacial sugery
Dentist, Lucknow
I am suffering from bad breath sometimes. Please suggest same good herbal medicines.
Get scaling polishing done by a dentist than brush twice daily especially at night use hi ora mouth wash drink plenty of water.
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My teeth have yellow spots. I think this is because I used to drink water directly from well. So this may be due to fluid ions. So is there any solution to make my teeth white back again.

BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
My teeth have yellow spots. I think this is because I used to drink water directly from well. So this may be due to f...
Hello user, Yes teeth can be whitened. Visit a dentist and ask for bleaching teeth. At home it is not possible because the spots you are describing are may be related to Fluoride. Wish you good health and happiness Keep me updated with the improvements Regards.
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A part of my front bottom tooth broke from its root and the broken piece was blackish & wasn't tough, now I can feel a gap with my tongue at the broken place which is not visible front front though, am 29 years old brushing my teeth regularly. But am worried now.

Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Hyderabad
A part of my front bottom tooth broke from its root and the broken piece was blackish & wasn't tough, now I can feel ...
Hi lybrate-user You can visit nearby dentist you may require dental cleaning The broken black piece is calculus.
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If my small puppy teeth very lightly scratch my hand and I could see very little blood should I put injection.

BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
If my small puppy teeth very lightly scratch my hand and I could see very little blood should I put injection.
Hello user, No, it's not needed because it is not a bite just a scratch but you must give injection to your pup that are required for its survival. Regards.
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My full body is fit. But 2 months before mouth ulcer happened and after consulting to doctor it went after 10 days. Then again after 15 days it happen at same place and healed within 10 days. Now again one happen under my tongue and after 6 days it healed again. I am scared what is this happening. Can you give me any advice.

Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Allahabad
Dear Lybrate user, maintain your oral hygiene, brush your teeth twice (morning & night) daily, clean your tongue properly with tongue cleaner. If you are taking tobacco or alcohol in any form quite them immediately. It may that you have any sharp edge of tooth which is irritating regularly your tongue & chick which results in ulcer, dirty teeth. Consult to your dentist for clinical diagnosis and needful treatment. If you have acidity problem treat your acidity first your ulcer will be cure soon.
1 person found this helpful
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On sunday evening I go to dentist and remove two tooth from left lower jaw. I condition of tooth is very damaged so I got deep wound after removal of tooth. After removal I got huge blood comes in my mouth, so I go to bed to avoid it but when I woke up on monday morning I have too much blood in my mouth. So I go to bathroom and clean it by water and then put cotton in mouth to stop blood. After heavy 2-3 hr blood stop, but small amount of blood comes whole day. On monday night all looks fine but when I sleep and woke up today (tuesday) I again got blood in my mouth not too much but not too less. Today at evening I still got blood in my saliva and when I spit. I consult my doctor he say all ok it's just bcz of your deep wound it takes time. I am worried about my continuous blood emission from my wound which make saliva red. So should I consult other doctor? Or any dentist can help me by consulting me?

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery), FWT (W.B)
Homeopath, 24 Parganas
On sunday evening I go to dentist and remove two tooth from left lower jaw. I condition of tooth is very damaged so I...
Hi Lybrate user for your problem you can take homoeopathic medecine to stop bleeding &healing wound 1.Arnica 30 & Hypericum 30 2 drops to be taken every alternatie 2 hours with half cup water, Hammamelis Q 20 drops mixed with half cup water & take every alternatie 15 minutes, then 2nd dose after 4 hours same process. You take ice cubes on wounded area. You must recover from this problem, if need you can consult with me privately, Take care.
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I am suffering dental floss for approximate 3 months. At night it occur pain sometimes.

BDS, MDS
Dentist, Jaipur
I am suffering dental floss for approximate 3 months. At night it occur pain sometimes.
Dental floss is used to clean teeth along with brushing. You need to check for right word for your problem.
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Osteoporosis - How It Impact Your Oral Health?

BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
Osteoporosis - How It Impact Your Oral Health?

Osteoporosis is an age related condition characterized by low bone density and fragile bones. Lack of calcium and vitamin D are the most common triggers of this condition. These are vital elements for healthy teeth as well. Osteoporosis has a direct relationship with oral health and can trigger a number of issues such as loss of teeth and gum and periodontal disease. The effects of osteoporosis on oral health are seen more in women than in men. 

This risk increases when talking about menopausal women. 

The jawbone is one of the areas which bear the brunt of osteoporosis. The loss of bone density in this area can make teeth loose and cause tooth loss. It can also affect the gum ridges that hold dentures in their place. This can result in ill fitting dentures that need to be frequently changed. 

Medication for osteoporosis is also linked to dental health. In rare cases, antiresorptive medicines that are prescribed to strengthen the bones can lead to a condition known as osteonecrosis. This refers to the death of a bone due to poor blood supply. Antiresorptive medication can be administered orally or intravenously with the latter having a higher risk of triggering osteonecrosis. Though it affects the hips and shoulder bones in most cases, it can also affect the jaw bone. It is marked by pain, swelling, infection and exposed bone. Loose teeth, gum infections and numbness or heaviness of the jaw are also symptoms of osteonecrosis of the jaw bone. 

 The risk of suffering from osteonecrosis cannot be determined beforehand. Hence it is a good idea to see your dentist before or just after starting antiresorptive treatment for osteoporosis and to schedule regular checkups for the duration of your treatment. Dental problems if any should be treated before starting medication for osteoporosis. Osteonecrosis of the jaw bone is most commonly seen after undergoing a dental procedure that affects the jawbone and associated tissues such as a tooth extraction. Ideally, invasive dental procedures should be avoided if you are taking antiresoptive medicines. However, it can also occur spontaneously. 

Biophosphonates are also commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis. This type of medication slows down the breakdown of bone tissue. However, this can lead to the development of new bones. This is not a troublesome issue when it comes to bones like the hip, leg or arm bones but can be very disruptive if it affects the jawbone. This is because the jaw bone is constantly reforming and reshaping itself.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1 person found this helpful

Sir main apne teeth ki bahut care krti hu uske baad bhi usme peelapan nahi jata can you tell me why.

BDS
Dentist, Margao
Sir main apne teeth ki bahut care krti hu uske baad bhi usme peelapan nahi jata can you tell me why.
That must be the basic shade of your teeth. If you want them whiter you need to get teeth whitening done.
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Sir main teeth ki bahut care krti hu uske baad bhi peelapan nahi jata can you tell me reason.

BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
Sir main teeth ki  bahut care krti hu uske baad bhi peelapan nahi jata can you tell me reason.
Hello user, This can be internal staining of teeth. Visit a dentist and get it checked properly. Wish you good health and happiness Keep me updated with the improvements Regards.
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I am 42 years from few days I am in difficult I have chala in my mouth some time finish. Again return. I am facing few days. I have 1 small Dana and cool down tongue. Kindly what I treatment. I am doing treatment taking kereostum homeo panic and some pinch turmeric and salt with hot water.

Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Allahabad
Dear Lybrate user, you have ulcers due to bad oral hygiene or sharp edges of teeth which regularly irritate your tongue & chick also, which cause ulcer. Maintain oral oral hygiene, brush your teeth twice (morning & night) daily. Clean your tongue properly with tongue cleaner. You need scaling your teeth if they are dirty due to deposition of stain & calculous. You should consult to dentist for scaling your teeth, round off sharp edge of teeth.
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HI, I am 32 Year women, I am experiencing the white line in sides of my tongue, when I goodgled it, It says Teeth tongue symptoms, I comes and goes, But now I feel burning sensation too with that line on left side of my thigh, I am feeling depressed now a days too with the extreme fear of cancer and there are many other factors including for my depression. Can you suggest me what it is.

BDS
Dentist, Margao
You need to consult your dentist. It might just be frictional keratosis and nothing to worry about but if there is burning sensation then you need to go see a dentist. If they are ulcers then they can be due to stress too.
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Common Complications After Dental Caping Or FPD

Bachelor of Dental Surgery
Dentist, Allahabad
Common Complications After Dental Caping Or FPD

1) If your crown is alive, crown cutting done for fpd or caping, it may cause mild pain for 7 to 10 days.
2) It may cause thermal sensation for some days
3) It may cause mild irritation.
4) It may feel bulging or heaviness. (specially is case of fpd).

 Treatment:- Generally these problems are auto cure in approx 10 days and there are no need of treatment. If it causes more pain, pain killers should be prescribed. Salt water gargle provide relief to patient in this case. These problems will be auto cure in 7 to 10 days.

Brushing, Flossing and Mouthwash Tips

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Brushing, Flossing and Mouthwash Tips

Brushing: 

Brushing seems like such an easy thing to do right? Then why do so many people do it so infrequently or ineffectively? I’ve had teenager (and occasionally adults) who even admit that they haven’t brushed their teeth in a week! Please don’t be this person! I’m going to go through some easy tips to make brushing more effective and help you reduce your risk of cavities, gum disease, and bad breath. Improving your oral hygiene is easy and doesn’t take much time at all! The biggest thing you’ve got to do is make a habit of it. A habit takes about 21 days of practice before it is ingrained. After it is a habit, it won’t feel difficult or like it is a chore and it’ll make a huge difference in your oral health.

Tip #1: Brush twice a day for 2 minutes each time with a fluoride toothpaste. Most people like to do this first thing in morning to get rid of morning breath and then right before bed. If you only can pick one, brush before bed. Your saliva production decreases at night and if you’ve got sugar or acid on your teeth, they’re more susceptible to attack. Two minutes is also important. You want enough time to fully remove all the build-up on your teeth (which take longer than you think) and allow the fluoride to be taken up into your tooth. The fluoride can’t be taken up effectively until you’ve cleaned all that mess off your teeth. If you want to be really thorough buy some plaque disclosing solution and use it before you brush your teeth. This will stain all the plaque on your teeth and will let you know when you’ve gotten it all off.

Tip #2: Don’t hold your toothbrush with the bristles at a 90 degree angle to your teeth. You want to hold it at a 45 degree angle to your teeth with the bristles pointing towards your gums and do quick vibrating or circular motion all around your mouth. This helps clean the plaque away from the area by the gums which is generally the hardest spot to keep clean. Another good way to brush is to place your tongue at a 45 degree angle to your gums and sweep the toothbrush down along the side of the tooth. The fancy name for this is the “modified bass method”. It works great if you spend a lot of time doing it but most people can’t pull this off consistently.

Tip #3: Don’t rinse your mouth out with water or mouthwash after brushing. Just spit out the toothpaste. This allows the ingredients in the toothpaste to continue working.

Tip #4: Always brush your tongue or use a tongue scraper. Your tongue is covered in taste buds that give food and bacteria a great place to hide. If you notice your tongue is a different color (like white, brown, or black) you’ve got a lot of work to do! Your tongue should be a nice pink color with no coating on the top of it. A lot of people have bad breath because they don’t do this.

Tip #5: Don’t brush right after drinking something acidic like soda or orange juice. The acid temporarily makes your enamel softer and you can actually brush some of it off if you brush immediately. Instead wait a minimum of 30 minutes and I’d probably recommend waiting even longer than that if you’re able to.

Tip #6: Consider investing in an electric toothbrush. They do a phenomenal job getting your teeth clean in a much shorter period of time than a manual toothbrush. The best types of electric toothbrushes are the ones with round heads that rotate and oscillate around. All you have to do is place it on the different surfaces of your teeth for a short period of time and it does all the work for you. No brushing or special technique needed. If you have poor dexterity in your hands (such as in children or the elderly) this becomes even more important. I think every kid should have a cheap electric toothbrush (cheap because they inevitably end up thrown off the counter, or in the toilet!). I’ve seen them for as little as $5 at places like Walmart.

Flossing:

For some reason everyone hates doing this even though it is so fast and easy. I have so many patients who will go to the gym every single day for an hour but can’t spare the extra half a minute to floss their teeth. I can guarantee you that flossing for 30 seconds a day has a much bigger overall health impact than 30 seconds at the gym. I can personally floss my teeth in 10-20 seconds. You can too with a little practice. Here are some tips on how to floss effectively and motivate you to keep doing it.

Tip #1: Make it a habit! Just like with brushing you need some time to make this a habit. Again, force yourself to do it at the same time each day for 21 days straight. After that it gets easy. Do it every night before going to bed. You’ll thank yourself when it is time to go to the dentist and when your teeth aren’t falling out at age 50 or 60.

Tip #2: Use a floss that is easy to use for you. Those flosses that shred and are a pain are why people hate flossing. The best floss is the one that you will use! My patients ask me all the time what I recommend. I always tell them that I don’t care what they use as long as they are using something!

Tip #3: “Only floss the teeth you want to keep”. Periodontal disease (bone loss around your teeth) is the number one reason why people lose teeth. I’ve never seen someone who flosses regularly develop periodontal disease (unless there was some rare underlying medical condition).

Tip #4: If you are terrible at flossing or can’t get into it, try purchasing a Waterpik and use that instead. A waterpik has a small wand with a tip that shoots a stream of water that can be used to clean between your teeth. It is just as effective as floss and can making cleaning around bridges or braces much easier than traditional floss. Want  really good breath afterwards? Fill it up with mouthwash instead of water and you’ll kill two birds with one stone.

Tip #5: If you’ve got big spaces between your teeth, try using soft piks instead of floss. There are a lot of variations and sizes with these but they all look basically the same. They look similar to little tiny christmas trees or pipe cleaners. You can find these next to the floss in most stores or you can usually find them in bulk online for better prices. They are small enough to fit in between the small spaces between your teeth but large enough that they clean the spaces really well! I’ve got a lot of older patients who do great keeping their teeth clean and use these exclusively.

Mouthwash:

Tip #1: Mouthwash cannot replacing brushing or flossing, ever! Listerine made this claim a while back, got sued for making false claims, and it was upheld in court! Always make brushing and flossing a priority before using mouthwash. It does work well in addition to doing these things.

Tip #2: Don’t use mouthwash immediately after brushing. This removes the ingredients from the toothpaste that are helping to protect your teeth. Wait at least 30 minutes. For most people they should brush their teeth in the morning, use mouthwash after lunch, and then brush and floss right before bed.

Tip #3: Figure out what mouthwash is correct for your situation. You can find mouthwashes that are better for breath control, dry mouth, reducing cavities, or a combination of all of them.

Best Diets For Your Teeth

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Best Diets For Your Teeth

You can’t go a day without seeing a new article about which diet is the best for losing weight, staying healthy, building muscle, or being environmentally responsible. There always seems to be some new trend that everyone is trying out. It can be hard enough to sort out which one is right for you before you even start asking the question I’m always thinking…

“What will it do to your teeth??”

I know. I know. It’s probably not the first question that comes to most people’s minds. I think it is a really important one though. A healthy set of teeth is important for eating and chewing as well as overall health. Many people are starting to realize that your mouth is a window into the health of the rest of your body. A great diet should be healthy for your teeth as well as for the rest of your body. Figuring out that part… Not so easy, but I’ve got you covered!

I’m going to go through all the major diets out there, and rank them according to how tooth friendly they are (This doesn’t take into account if the diet is effective for anything else… just how “safe” it is for your teeth). These rankings are my subjective ratings on the diets based on how I think the average person would use the diet.

One last piece of advice before we get into the rankings….

Almost any diet can be made “teeth healthy” if you understand and follow the basic rules about how to eat for healthy teeth. The problem is that people don’t usually understand how the process works, what foods can actually cause cavities, and how to avoid it.

Diets with a Tooth Score of 0-2 will be very challenging to follow as is and not develop cavities long term.

Diets with a Tooth Score of 3 can be made teeth healthy if you watch what and how you’re eating.

Diets with a Tooth Score of 4-5 will typically be quite teeth healthy without much modification.

ABS DIET

This diet recommends six meals a day, each meal containing at least two of it’s twelve superfoods (Almonds/Other Nuts, Beans, Spinach/Green Veggies, Dairy, Instant Oatmeal, Eggs, Turkey/Lean Meats, Peanut Butter, Olive Oil, Whole Grain Breads and Cereals, Whey Protein Powder, and Berries. Smoothies are a highly recommended way to get many of these meals in.

Pros: It recommends limiting refined carbohydrates and sugar.

Cons: It keeps you eating all throughout the day. Whole grain breads and cereals can still cause cavities. Sipping on smoothies, especially if they are berry heavy, is a good way to get cavities.

Tooth Score: 2/5. The constant eating is the biggest risk factor with this diet.

 

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DIET

This diet is a relatively complicated one to follow! Here are the basic rules… 1) Eat as much fresh food as possible 2) Avoid processed foods and sugars 3) Get 40-50% of your calories from carbs, 30% from fat, and 20-30% from protein 4) Eat whole grains 5) Eat pasta in moderation 6) Avoid high fructose  7) Reduce your intake of saturated fats 8) Eat more vegetable based protein than animal based protein other than fish 9) Eat fruits and vegetables from the entire color spectrum and 10) Drink water

Pros: It recommends you limit most refined carbohydrates, sugar, and high fructose corn syrup. These are the biggest contributors to tooth decay.

Cons: It can be complicated to follow and know if you’re doing right.

Tooth Score: 4/5. It cuts out the vast majority of foods that are known to cause cavities.

 

ATKINS DIET

The Atkins diet is one of the most popular low carb diets out there. It has you cut out almost all starchy and sugary carb foods including candy, cookies, chips, potatoes, pasta, bread, and sugary drinks.

Pros: It cuts out almost all carbs and sugars which are the biggest contributors to tooth decay.

Cons: None for your teeth.

Tooth Score: 5/5. By cutting out almost all carbs (except those you get from vegetables) you reduce your risk for cavities drastically.

 

BIGGEST LOSER DIET

The Biggest Loser Diet, popularized by the reality television show, focuses on small portions of food eaten in 5-6 meals throughout the day. It emphasizes weight loss which is achieved by eating fewer calories. The recommended foods for this diet include lean proteins such as turkey or chicken, low fat dairy, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts.

Pros: It cuts out refined carbohydrates.

Cons: You are eating more frequently and still have a good number of sugars and carbs in your diet from grains and fruits.

Tooth Score: 2/5. The combination of eating frequently and carbs isn’t usually a good one for your teeth. Limiting how often you eat grains and fruits will help lessen the impact on your teeth.

 

DASH DIET

The DASH diet was originally created as a diet to help keep blood pressure in check. It has since been rated by several publications as one of the best overall diets to follow. It recommends eating the following servings of food each day (on a 2000 calorie diet): 7-8 servings of whole grains, 4-5 servings of fruit, 4-5 servings of vegetables, 2-3 servings of low fat or non-fat dairy, 2 or less servings of lean meats, fish, or poultry, 4-5 servings per week of nuts, seeds, and legumes, and limited consumption of fats and sweets. It also recommends keeping sodium intake very low

Pros: Great for your overall health

Cons: It has a large proportion of your food coming from grain and grain products as well as fruits. All of these can contribute to cavities if eaten too frequently.

Tooth Score: 3/5. To make this diet more teeth healthy, limit grain products, fruits, and any sugary items to your specific mealtimes and don’t snack on them throughout the day.

 

FAST DIET (5:2)

The fast diet (the most popular of which is the 5:2 variety) is a diet in which you eat normally 5 days out of the week and the other two days you eat a very small number of calories (usually around 500 calories). The goal of this diet is to lose weight. It says you can pretty much eat what you want on your non-fast days. The major goal is calorie reduction.

Pros: One of the easier ones to follow.

Cons: There aren’t any recommendations about cutting out refined carbs and sugar.

Tooth Score: 1/5 if your 5 regular days are like the typical western diet (high in refined carbs, sugars, and sweet drinks). If you eat more healthy foods on your regular days this could be a reasonable diet for your teeth.

 

FERTILITY DIET

The Fertility Diet as the name suggests was created to help people get pregnant. Many cases of infertility are related to the woman not ovulating which this diet can help with. The rules include avoiding trans fats, using unsaturated vegetable oils, eating vegetable proteins instead of animal proteins, eating slow carbs such as whole grains, vegetables, and fruits, drinking whole milk, eating iron containing plants, and staying hydrated while avoiding sugary drinks.

Pros: It recommends avoiding refined carbohydrates and extra sugars.

Cons: It is recommended that some women gain weight on the diet to get to a more healthy BMI for fertility. It is easy to eat the wrong foods in order to do this (such as ice cream or too many carbs).

Tooth Score: 4/5. Overall a good diet as long as you watch how often you’re consuming carbs and fruits.

 

FLAT BELLY DIET

The Flat Belly Diet claims you can lose up to 15 lbs in a month with their system. For the first four days of the diet you can only eat 1200 calories and avoid all salt, processed foods, carbs, and gassy foods such as broccoli, onions, and beans. After the first four days you shoot for 1600 calories a day, eating a small meal/snack every four hours and sticking to a Mediterranean style diet. You also have to drink 2 liters of water a day that has been mixed with ginger root, cucumber, lemon, and mint leaves.

Pros: After the first four days, it sticks to a Mediterranean style diet, which is pretty tooth safe.

Cons: The water concoction isn’t great for your teeth (regular water would be much better) and eating all throughout the day is associated with a higher rate of developing cavities.

Tooth Score: 2/5. If you drink plain water instead of their “sassy water” and avoid most processed carbs and sugars, it’ll be much safer for your teeth.

 

FLEXITARIAN DIET

The Flexitarian diet aims to have you add five new food groups to your diet without putting specific restrictions on what else you can eat: Plant proteins such as tofu, beans, nuts, eggs, or seeds, fruits and vegetables, whole grains, dairy, and sugar and spice. It also aims to reduce the calories you eat each day.

Pros: Relatively easy to follow.

Cons: Easy to justify eating too many carbs and sugar.

Tooth score: 2/5. While much healthier than the standard diet, it still allows a lot of cavity creating foods, which if eaten too frequently will definitely cause tooth decay.

 

GLYCEMIC INDEX DIET

The Glycemic Index Diet attempts to get you to only eat foods that have a low glycemic index (eg. that don’t spike your blood sugar quickly such as refined carbohydrates, sugars, crackers, etc).

Pros: Many of the foods that have a high glycemic index are also cavity causing. Cutting them out will help.

Cons: Some of the moderate to low glycemic index foods can still cause cavities (such as fruits, pasta, or ice cream).

Tooth score 3/5. If you watch how often you eat those additional cavity causing foods, you can lessen the impact on your teeth.

 

INTERMITTENT FASTING

Intermittent fasting is a pretty broad term that spans everything from the 5:2 fast diet to one meal a day to a whole variety of other diets. The one thing that binds them all together is the emphasis on extended periods of not eating / minimal eating.

Pros: Extended fast periods are good and safe for your teeth.

Cons: No guidance on what types of foods to eat.

Tooth score: 4/5. One of the biggest factors in developing cavities is the frequency with which you eat sugars and carbohydrates that cavity causing bacteria feed on. Intermittent fasting makes it so that you don’t eat them frequently, even if you do eat them.

 

JENNY CRAIG DIET

Many people love the Jenny Craig Diet because they make it easy. They send you pre-packaged meals and provide you with the meal plans so that you can stay on track. Portion size control is the biggest thing that they do for you.

Pros: By having pre-set meals and snacks you are able to avoid constant snacking throughout the day.

Cons: There are still a lot of refined carbohydrates and sugars in their meals, snacks, and desserts.

Tooth Score: 3/5.

 

MAYO CLINIC DIET

The Mayo Clinic Diet focuses on eating according to their Healthy Food Pyramid which emphasizes eating a lot of fruits, vegetables, and in lesser amounts, “smart” carbohydrates such as whole grains. For the initial portion of the diet, they also recommend cutting out artificial sweeteners, alcohol, and all sugary items but are added back after losing the weight you’d like to lose.

Pros: It recommends cutting out refined carbohydrates and eat “smart ” carbohydrates such as you’ll find in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

Cons: Carbohydrates (with a picture of pasta) are still high on their list of foods to eat.

Tooth Score: 3/5

 

MEDITERRANEAN DIET

The Mediterranean Diet basically has four different categories of foods to eat… Eat regularly, Eat in Moderation, Eat Rarely, and Don’t Eat. Eat regularly includes fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads and pasta, nuts, beans, fish, and healthy oils such as olive oil. Eat in moderation includes eggs, dairy, and poultry. Eat rarely includes red meat. Don’t eat includes refined carbohydrates, processed foods, processed meats, and sugars.

Pros: It cuts out refined carbohydrates.

Cons: It still has a heavy emphasis on carbohydrates and fruits which can both cause cavities if eaten frequently.

Tooth Score: 3/5

 

MIND DIET

MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (quite a mouthful!). The goal of the diet is to reduce your risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have shown that it is effective in doing this if followed well. The foods it recommends eating are a combination of the Mediterranean and DASH diets, specifically the ones that are good for brain health. These include green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, berries, nuts, whole grains, fish, and poultry.

Pros: It cuts out refined carbohydrates.

Cons: Like the two diets it is based on, a large proportion of calories still come from carbohydrates and fruits. This can cause cavities if eaten too frequently.

Tooth Score: 3/5.

 

NUTRISYSTEM DIET

The Nutrisystem diet is similar to the Jenny Craig Diet in that you select from pre-packaged meals that are shipped to your house. It focuses on portion control and eating many small meals throughout the day. The meals shoot for 50% of your calories from carbohydrates, 25% from protein, and 25% from fat.

Pros: You have some flexibility in what meals you get.

Cons: A lot of meals have sugar or a lot of carbohydrates in them and it also recommends you eat frequently throughout the day.

Tooth Score: 2/5.  Too many carbohydrates too often can lead to cavities.

 

ORNISH DIET

In the Ornish diet foods are broken up into five categories, Group 1 being the most healthy all the way to Group 5 which is the least healthy. Group 1 includes fruits, vegetables, beans, non-fat dairy, and whole grains. Group 2 includes avacados, nuts, seeds, and various oils such as canola or olive. Group 3 includes seafood and reduced fat dairy products. Group 4 includes poultry, whole fat dairy products, cookies, and cakes. Group 5 includes red meat, butter, fried foods, and other highly processed foods. The goal is to eat primarily from groups 1 and 2, occasionally from group 3, and infrequently from groups 4 and 5.

Pros: It cuts out most refined carbohydrates.

Cons: Depending on how you implement the diet you can end up with a lot of carb heavy meals.

Tooth Score 3/5

 

PALEO DIET

The goal of the Paleo diet is to eat like early humans used to eat. This can be quite variable so there are a good number of variations on this diet. Most practitioners of the Paleo diet recommend getting the vast majority of your calories from fruits, vegetables, nuts, and meat. Beans, sugars, and most carbohydrates, even whole grain, are a big no-no.

Pro: It cuts out most carbohydrates except for what you get from fruits and vegetables.

Cons: It’s unclear if this diet is actually healthy for the rest of your body (even though it is pretty good for your teeth)

Tooth Score: 5/5

 

SLIM FAST DIET

You eat Slim Fast products as meal replacements. These primarily include shakes, meals bars, and snack bars. You also fix one 500 calorie meal a day. The primary goal of this diet is to lose weight, not to be a long term diet plan.

Pro: It is an easy diet to follow, if not very exciting.

Cons: Most of the products have sugar or carbs in them.

Tooth Score 1/5.

 

SLOW CARB DIET

The Slow Carb Diet was popularized by Tim Ferris in his book, “The Four Hour Body”. Tim Ferris differentiates between “fast carbs” and “slow carbs”. Fast carbs are things like sugar and refined carbohydrates (such as white flour) that break down quickly into sugars. He specifically says to avoid anything white and starchy as well as fruits. Slow carbs are things like whole grains and vegetables that your body breaks down much more slowly. You basically cut out all “fast carbs” from your diet 6 out of the 7 days of the week. The 7th day is a cheat day and you can eat whatever you want. You also shouldn’t drink any calories so no sugary drinks allowed.

Pros: The diet really cuts out the vast majority of foods that cause cavities.

Cons: Most people go crazy on the cheat day, but it shouldn’t be too much of problem if eat the right things on the other days.

Tooth Score: 4/5

 

SMOOTHIE OR JUICING DIET

Several documentaries have extolled the virtues of a smoothie or juicing only diet for some period of time in order to lose weight. The most popular of these is “Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead”. The basic idea is that you only make fruit and vegetable smoothies or juice for whatever period of time you need in order to lose your required amount of weight.

Pros: None that I can think of.

Cons: Drinks with sugar (such as almost every smoothie or juice) are terrible for your teeth, especially if you consume them frequently.

Tooth Score: 0/5. This is a dangerous one for your teeth.

 

SOUTH BEACH DIET

The South Beach Diet is another low carb / right carb diet. It breaks up the diet into three separate phases. Phase 1 is the most restrictive and cuts out all carbohydrates except those with a very low glycemic index such as such as vegetables. This phase is very tooth friendly and intended to help you lose a lot of weight. Phase 2 lets you re-introduce some of those carbs back into your diet. It recommends only whole grains, fruits, whole wheat pasta, and sweet potatoes. This is moderately tooth friendly. Phase 3 is when you are at a stable weight and are just maintaining. It recommends you make good food choices based on your experiences in the first two phases. You can go back to phase 1 and 2 if you need to lose more weight.

Pros: Cuts out refined carbohydrates for the most part.

Cons: Once you’re at a stable weight, it is far less restrictive and you might start choosing foods that are bad for your teeth again.

Tooth Score 3/5. Depending on what phase you’re in, it can be either good or bad for your teeth.

 

STANDARD WESTERN DIET

This isn’t so much a “diet” as it is the typical way many people eat today. It started in the United States and has since spread to most other parts of the world. There is a heavy emphasis on refined carbohydrates, meats, and sugary drinks. Fruits and vegetables are usually an afterthought. It is responsible for the skyrocketing rates of obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and many other diseases. As expected it is terrible for your teeth too.

Tooth Score: 0/5

 

TLC DIET

The TLC diet aims to lower your bad cholesterol levels and be heart healthy. It does this by reducing saturated fats in your diet. On this diet you’ll want to avoid most saturated fats including butter, whole fat dairy, and fatty meats. It also increases the amount of soluble fiber you consume. The recommended foods include fruits, vegetables, fish, skin off lean meats, bread, pasta, and other whole grains.

Pros: It is rated as a good diet for your heart.

Cons: There are a lot of recommended carbs in this diet. If you’re eating fruits, bread, and pasta too frequently you’ll likely develop cavities.

Tooth Score: 2/5

 

TRADITIONAL ASIAN DIET

This one spans a good variety of different diets prevalent in the area of Asia. Most of them are low fat and include large amounts of rice, vegetables, fruit, and fish. Red meat is very limited.

Pros: It is typically considered a pretty healthy diet.

Cons: Rice, fruit, and noodles can definitely cause cavities, especially if combined with any added sugars.

Tooth Score: 2/5

 

VEGAN DIET

A vegan diet aims to cut out all animals products. That means no butter, eggs, dairy, cheese, meats, or fish. Most people on a vegan diet eat large amounts of fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, pasta, and bread.

Pros: A well done vegan diet (heavy on the vegetables, fruits, beans, and nuts can be really healthy).

Cons: It is easy to load up on carbs or sweets while on this diet since you have so many other restrictions.

Tooth Score: 2/5. I recently had a patient who had 15 cavities while eating a vegan diet. She was snacking on potato chips all day which led to the cavities. I’ve seen the same thing with fresh fruit heavy diets. You can make it more teeth healthy by eating more whole grains, limiting the frequency with which you have them (don’t snack on them!), and avoiding added sugars.

 

VEGETARIAN DIET

The vegetarian diet cuts out all meat products but other animal products such as dairy and eggs are OK for most people. There are a couple of different variations that allow different items. Most people eat a large amount of vegetables, fruits, cheese, nuts, beans, pasta, and bread.

Pros: A well done vegetarian diet can be really healthy.

Cons: As with the vegan diet it is easy to load up on way too many carbs and sugars.

Tooth Score: 2/5. To make this one more teeth healthy avoid eating carbs and extra sugars except at meal times.

 

VOLUMETRICS DIET

The Volumetrics Diet is different than many of the other diets I’ve featured on here. Instead of focusing on food groups or calories, it recommends simply eating high volume, low calorie foods to keep you full without eating excess calories. Examples of these high volume, low calorie foods include fruits, vegetables, low fat dairy, whole grains, and lean meat.

Pros: It recommends cutting out refined carbohydrates.

Cons: You can still develop cavities if you are eating a lot of the fruits and grains too frequently.

Tooth Score: 3/5

 

WEIGHT WATCHERS DIET

Weight Watchers works by using a SmartPoints system. You have a set number of points you can use each day. Foods that are healthy cost very few points while calorie heavy, non-nutritious foods cost a lot of points. No food is banned in this diet. The SmartPoints system aims to get you to eat low calorie and fillings foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean vegetables.

Pros: Most of their “good” foods are pretty healthy for your teeth.

Cons: You can eat small amounts of the “bad” foods on this diet and if you are doing it frequently throughout the day they can still cause cavities.

Tooth Score: 2/5

 

ZONE DIET

This diet ends up being a relatively low carbohydrate diet. It allows you 3 meals a day a two snacks. Each meal is supposed to be 30% protein, 30% fat, and 40% non-starchy/non-sugary carbohydrates. High sugar fruits and vegetables are discouraged as well as bad fats like red meat and egg yolks. Most meals end up being about 1/4 lean meat, 2/3 good fruits and vegetables, and the rest good fats such as avocados, etc.

Pros: It cuts out most foods that cause cavities.

Cons: Not many from the perspective of your teeth.

Tooth Score: 5/5

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