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Dr. Amar Nath Shaw  - Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna

Dr. Amar Nath Shaw

88 (10 ratings)
MCh (CTVS)

Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna

11 Years Experience ₹300 online
Book appointment and get ₹125 LybrateCash (Lybrate Wallet) after your visit
Dr. Amar Nath Shaw 88% (10 ratings) MCh (CTVS) Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
11 Years Experience ₹300 online
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Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Amar Nath Shaw
Cardio thoracic and vascular surgeon Interested in both adult and child heart surgeries Also doing thoracic and vascular cases

Info

Education
MCh (CTVS) - medical college kolkata - 2007
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Awards and Recognitions
Started first ever Cardiac surgery in whole of North bihar
Professional Memberships
Member of Association of CTVS Surgeon West Bengal
Indian Association of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgeons (IACTS)

Location

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Paras HMRI Patna

Raja Bazar Bailey Road patnaPatna Get Directions
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Paras Global Hospital

VIP Road, Allalpatti, DarbhangaDarbhanga Get Directions
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Endovascular Repair Of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms!

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Endovascular Repair Of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms!

The aorta is the largest blood vessel that supplies pure, oxygenated blood to the various parts of the body. Starting in the left lower heart chamber, it takes a U-turn down to the abdominal area and then the legs. It branches as it goes down, with two main branches being the thoracic and abdominal aorta.

Thoracic aortic aneurysm, also known as thoracic aortic dissection or descending aortic aneurysm is abnormal swelling of the aorta in the chest which can rupture over a period of time. The exact cause as to why this occurs has not been identified yet. Family history does have a role to play along with smoking, and history of heart disease, identified as risk factors.
The condition is quite slow to progress and often gets diagnosed when some other disease is being investigated. There are no clear symptoms to indicate this aneurysm, other than a probable hoarseness of voice, difficulty swallowing or pain in the shoulder blades. This is often due to the pressure it exerts on the surrounding areas.

Diagnosis, as noted above, is often when some other condition is being investigated. It can be identified on an x-ray and then further confirmed with MRI or CT scan.

Treatment is often decided based on the overall severity of an aneurysm and the condition of the patient. In most cases, the doctor might decide to wait and watch. The patient is monitored at regular intervals to ensure no symptoms develop and the condition is under control. Every once in 6 months, a scanning can be done to ensure that the aneurysm is not growing. The idea is to prevent rupture and internal bleeding, which can be life-threatening. Thoracic aortic endovascular graft repair, often referred to as TEVAR, is the most widely used technique for definitive treatment of a thoracic aortic aneurysm.

Treatment: What happens during TEVAR is that an aneurysm is identified and isolated. An incision is made in the groin area through which a small device is placed in the aorta at the area of an aneurysm. The part of the aorta with the aneurysm is replaced with a graft, so that normal blood flow is restored. Alternately, the blood flow could be bypassed to skip the aneurysm and flow through an alternate route.
This is a minimally invasive procedure and done as an outpatient than the conventional open heart surgeries that were done earlier.

Postop care:
- Maintain good control over blood pressure
- Watch out for recurrence, especially if there is a strong family history
- Quit smoking

Thoracic aortic aneurysms are very rare and not easy to identify. However, given the possible complications, they require timely intervention.
 

1874 people found this helpful

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) - The Many Benefits Of It!

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) - The Many Benefits Of It!

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) is a traditional and well established surgical procedure for treating diseases in the coronary artery. The process is carried out by using blood vessels alternately (vein or artery). Initially, CABG was performed by using the left internal mammary artery and saphenous vein. It was observed that the chance of occlusion in the vein grafts was much higher than the arterial grafts. In the last decade, total arterial grafting, which uses all the arterial conduits, is being practiced as CABG for better results.

Types of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

  1. Traditional Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: In this type of CABG, the surgeon will initially open up the chest bone to gain access to the heart. The heart is stopped using medications and the body is connected to a heart-lung bypass machine to circulate oxygen and blood throughout the body.
  2. Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting: In this surgery, small incisions are made on the left portion of the chest to gain access to the heart. This surgery is used to bypass the blood vessels present in the front portion of the heart.
  3. Off-pump Coronary artery bypass grafting: In this procedure, the chest bone is opened up to access the heart. Here, however, the heart is not stopped during the surgery.

Patients, who have been suffering since a long time and have been operated on the vein grafts, have a chance of re-developing certain artery diseases such as a heart attack. To counter this possibility, surgeons have started using the method of Total Artery CABG. In this procedure, the left and right internal mammary arteries are used from the chest and the radial artery, from the fore arm for the surgery.

The main advantages of this procedure are:

  1. The survival rate is higher in total artery CABG as compared to the traditional CABG.
  2. It comes with long term benefits
  3. The procedure is safe as well as feasible


 

5283 people found this helpful

Heart Attack And Cardiac Arrest - Know The Differences!

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Heart Attack And Cardiac Arrest - Know The Differences!

A heart attack and Cardiac Arrest may sound like terms that have the same medical meaning. They are not. While a heart attack occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is blocked, a cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops to beat. You might want to know the causes behind the conditions and the symptoms and signs that one may experience. Read on to know about them.

What is a heart attack and what is a cardiac arrest?
When the flow of blood towards the heart gets blocked, a heart attack occurs. This may be due to a clot in the arteries or plaque buildup on the walls of the arteries. A sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the affected individual's heart malfunctions as well as it stops to beat all of a sudden.

Thus, it is evident that heart attack is actually a circulation problem whereas cardiac arrest is an electrical problem. During a heart attack, blood rich in oxygen is not allowed to reach a particular part of the heart because of a blocked artery. If quick treatment is not done for reopening the blocked artery, then that specific section of the heart which receives nourishment from that artery tends to die.

In cardiac arrest, as the heart stops beating unexpectedly, so organs like brain, lungs, etc. also stop receiving blood. It results in a sudden fall in blood pressure as well as the circulatory system tends to collapse. Usually, the affected individual loses consciousness because the flow of blood to the brain decreases. Death might follow if emergency treatment is not carried out immediately.

Quite like the conditions are different, the symptoms are also different. Here are some of the most common symptoms of both heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest. It will assist you in understanding that both these health issues are different.

Symptoms of a heart attack:
Pressure or pain in abdomen or chest, trouble breathing, sweating, dizziness, chest tightening feeling, pain that spreads to arm or jaw, losing unconsciousness, heart palpitation, etc. are some of the basic signs. According to studies, nearly one-thirds of the heart attack patients do not undergo chest pain during heart attacks.

Particularly women experience atypical symptoms other than the ones that are mentioned above. Few of them include gastric pain, vomiting, nausea, breathing problem without any chest pain, getting unconscious, etc.

Symptoms of Cardiac Arrest:
Collapse, dizziness, trouble in breathing, chest pain, blue discoloration of face, etc. are the most common sudden cardiac arrest's signs. A huge number of people who experience cardiac arrest do not experience any symptoms at all.

Though both heart attack and cardiac arrest are linked to each other some way or the other, yet they are different. However, both the conditions need immediate medical assistance, an absence of which may prove fatal.

4903 people found this helpful

Blockages In Heart Arteries - What Does This Mean?

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Blockages In Heart Arteries - What Does This Mean?

Blockage in heart is a common term used for narrowing of coronary arteries. Coronary arteries are vessels, which supply blood and thus oxygen and food) to continuously working heart muscles. Heart muscles which are not tired working from the birth till death, however, cannot sustain long without blood supply.

A reduction in blood supply gives rise to ischemia of heart muscles commonly manifested as chest discomfort or angina. A sudden complete shutdown of blood supply leads to heart attack leading to permanent damage to heart (if blood flow not reestablished promptly).

But what causes these arteries to block? Deposition of LDL cholesterol (low density cholesterol) in inner surface of coronary arteries is the primary reason of these blockages. LDL a normal component of blood (upto certain limit) starts depositing in arteries as early as 10 years of age!

Deposition of billions of LDL molecules over several years on inner surface of arteries gives rise to visible narrowings in these arteries. Flow ahead of these narrowings is reduced in proportion to the narrowing. At a level of 70 % narrowing the flow is reduced to give ischemia (and angina) during exercise. Gradually increasing degree of narrowing reduces the exercise needed for ischemia and angina; a narrowing of more than 90 % can give symptoms at rest. A sudden clot formation at any of these stages can block the flow suddenly giving a heart attack.

If LDL is a normal component of blood, why it is deposited in the arteries at first place?

LDL above a certain limit in blood starts depositing in the arteries. Diabetes, Hypertension, smoking, less exercise and genetics makes it more sticky thus making narrowing faster. This is why these risk elements need to be properly attended for prevention from heart disease. For treatment medicines are important for stopping the progression of narrowings; angioplasty is a method of fast resolution of blockage; and bypass surgery is the method of creating a whole new blood supply for the affected part of the heart. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4865 people found this helpful

How To Give CPR The Right Way?

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
How To Give CPR The Right Way?

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR is an activity that should be learnt by everybody. It’s a skill that comes handy at the time of the crisis. Owing to the fact that 90 percent of the overall cardiac related conditions occur outside the hospital, learning CPR becomes essential. A person with the knowledge of CPR can save the life of a patient in those crucial seconds when life hangs in the balance. Here is a brief know how about CPR and the way it is done:

Before CPR is started:
It is necessary to tap the patient on the shoulder and ask if he is fine. If the answer is not in the affirmative, seeking medical help is the best possible alternative. If medical help such as ambulance is out of reach, starting the CPR is the best possible way to go.

CPR for children above 9 years:
The patient should be laid on their back and the person intending to give the CPR should kneel next to the shoulder and neck of the patient. The heel of one hand should be placed to the center of the chest of the patient. The heel of the other hand should be placed over the lace and first fingers together. The elbow of the person intending to give the CPR should be kept straight and the shoulder should be aligned directly over the hands. Thus, begins the process of compression as hard as possible. The aim should be to compress at least 100 times within a single minute. The chest should be given the chance to arise fully in between each compression. One small hat tip in this regard is to give the CPR in the disco mode. One beat at a time.

CPR for infants and children below 9 years:
Before starting the CPR, the head should be tilted backward and the chin should be lifted upward to open the passage for the airway. In case the breathing is absent, either of the below-mentioned rescue breaths should be applied:

  1. For a child, the nose should be shut and mouth should be completely sealed.
  2. For an infant, the seal is applicable on the mouth and the nose both.

This should be followed by blowing in the mouth till the chest has a visible rise. There should at least be 30 chest compressions given to the patient within a minute. While For a child the chest should be pushed with one or two hands, for an infant, the chest should be pushed with no more than three fingers. The above steps should be repeated three to four times.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4377 people found this helpful

Heart Transplant - When Is The Right Time

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Heart Transplant - When Is The Right Time

There are many people worldwide who suffer from heart problems (irrespective of their age and sex). While in most cases, the condition improves with proper treatment and medications, in few, the condition is beyond treatment. A heart transplant comes as a savior for such people. It gives them a new lease of life. The transplant involves replacing a heart that has stopped functioning normally (damaged or may be diseased) with a healthy heart (from the donor).

Over the years, heart transplant has undergone a sea of change. With the advancement of science and technology, the success rate in a heart transplant has seen an exponential rise.

People who need a heart transplant:
A heart transplant may be essential in the following cases.

  • A congenital heart disorder (a person born with a heart problem).
  • Defective or diseased heart valves.
  • Amyloidosis (a condition where amyloid fibrils get deposed in the tissues and organs of the body intracellularly or extracellularly).
  • Problems in the coronary artery.
  • Cardiomyopathy (A condition where the muscles of the heart become weak, thereby affecting the normal functioning of the heart).
  • A heart transplant that failed previously.
  • Ventricular Arrhythmias (a condition that originates in the ventricles, in ventricular arrhythmias, the heart rhythms are abnormally rapid).

However, under the following circumstances, a heart transplant may not be a wise idea

  • People with infections or chronic lung or kidney disorders.
  • A case of cancer in the past.
  • Age may be a deciding factor.The recovery from a heart transplant may not be 100% in an aged person.

The heart transplant procedure:

The first step in heart transplant is the availability of a suitable donor. In this case, a donor is a person whose brain is dead but the other organs, including the heart, is healthy and functioning properly. A surgeon performs three operations in a heart transplant.

  • The first operation is essentially the removal of the healthy heart from the donor body. The heart is kept in a cool place, preferably ice (to keep the heart alive and in good condition until the heart transplant takes place).
  • In the second operation, the recipient's damaged or diseased heart is operated out.The situation may, however, be complicated if the patient had a heart surgery in the past.
  • The third and the final surgery involves implanting the donor heart into the recipient body (the recipient's upper heart chambers and the atrial back wall are however not removed).
  • Once the implantation takes place (without any complications), the surgeons sew the heart into place.
  • The blood vessels are then connected back to the heart and the lungs. The heart starts beating again once it is warmed up.
  • To enable the patient to receive the nutrients and oxygen (during the heart transplant), the patient is put on a heart-lung machine.
  • If no complications develop after the transplant, the patient is discharged within a fortnight.

In some unfortunate cases, there may be organ rejection. The condition arises when the recipient's immune cells see the transplanted heart as non-self (foreign agents). If left unattended, it may damage the heart. Immunosuppressant drugs can help avert the rejection. However, it is important to monitor the patient closely for any infections that may arise to the administration of the immunosuppressants.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4791 people found this helpful

Silent Heart Attacks - Understanding Them Deeply!

MCh (CTVS)
Cardiothoracic Vascular Surgery, Patna
Silent Heart Attacks - Understanding Them Deeply!

A heart attack does not always have obvious symptoms, such as pain in your chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats. In fact, a heart attack can actually happen without a person knowing it. This condition is known as a ‘silent heart attack’, medically known as ‘silent ischemia’, occurring due to the shortage of oxygen supply to the heart muscle.

The causes of a silent heart attack are similar to that of a heart attack. They include-

  1. Obesity or excess weight
  2. Lack of exercise
  3. Disorders such as diabetes
  4. High blood pressure
  5. High cholesterol
  6. Age, usually above 65
  7. Heart diseases
  8. Consumption of tobacco or smoking

A silent cardiac arrest makes one more vulnerable to another heart attack that could be fatal.

Diagnosis:

The only method to diagnose if you had a silent heart attack is through imaging tests, such as echocardiogram, electrocardiogram or others. These tests can show certain changes which might be indicative of a heart attack.

An analysis of one’s overall health and the symptoms can aid in deciding whether few more tests are required.

How would you prevent a silent heart attack?

  1. Get your cholesterol and blood pressure count tested regularly.
  2. Refrain from smoking.
  3. Be aware of your body and call on a doctor if you feel there’s anything which is bothering you.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4415 people found this helpful