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Dr. S.C Aneja  - Veterinarian, Panchkula

Dr. S.C Aneja

BVSc & Animal Husbandry, Post Graduate Diploma In Veterinary Gynaecology and ...

Veterinarian, Panchkula

46 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
Dr. S.C Aneja BVSc & Animal Husbandry, Post Graduate Diploma In Veterin... Veterinarian, Panchkula
46 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. S.C Aneja
Dr. S.C Aneja is a trusted Veterinarian in Sector 21, Panchkula. He has been a successful Veterinarian for the last 45 years. He has done BVSc & Animal Husbandry, Post Graduate Diploma In Veterinary Gynaecology and Obstetrics. You can meet Dr. S.C Aneja personally at Vet Pet Care Centre in Sector 21, Panchkula. Book an appointment online with Dr. S.C Aneja on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Panchkula and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
BVSc & Animal Husbandry - Ludhiana University - 1971
Post Graduate Diploma In Veterinary Gynaecology and Obstetrics - Indian Veterinary Research Institute - 1991
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Indian Veterinary Association
Indian veterinary council

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H No-1547, Panchkula, Sec 21, PanchkulaPanchkula Get Directions
150 at clinic
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My dog is having high fever with blood in motion and also vomiting since 1 day. He is 3 months old. Please tell me what to do? please

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
May be of parvo diarrhoea . please investigate about vaccination history and also treat with a vet with fluids for at least 5 days
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Sir my dog is of 7 month i.E pomalian dog & he is vomiting from 3 days , vomiting colour is yellow firstly then its light yellow colour from outside & inside it looks white sticky cough like so suggest anything sir ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Its summer gastritis please feed him half the food as usually and please give plenty of water and water melon if possible and suspension normetrogyl orally 5 ml 3 times daily and consult your vet.
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Hello doctor my dog, 2yr old male great dane vomits the food particularly at night. Around 6 hours after having the food which is mainly 3 egg with rice and vegetables - home made food. The food is as it is, undigested this happened twice continuously at night now. And happens once or twice a month (anytime, no time relevance) what should be done. What is better food for him, something we can prepare at home? is it something to do with rice or egg yellow?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Great dane is a giant breed, and needs optimal proteins to maintain his health. The food he's currently being offered doesn't appear to fulfill his requirements. You can explore to offer him 650-750gms of boiled boneless chicken + 150gms of overcooked rice in a day. About 4 boiled egg whites can be given as well. Please avoid egg yellow. Alternatively - you can explore offering him giant breed pet food, or a combination of pet food + home cooked food. Regarding vomiting - please check food timings, overdue deworming etc. Hows his stools? you may need to add some meds to enhance emptying of stomach contents down the intestines, if he vomits the food as it is.
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My pet dog (German Shepherd) is in bad condition of fever at last two days. What should I do?

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Fever could be due to multiple reasons. Along with fever does you dog have any loose motion, diarrhea or coughing etc. Kindly advice so that I can suggest next steo
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My labra dog is 6 month old and his weight is 28 kg mere dog ko bahut khujali ho rahi he or vo itna khujata he ki vaha se blood nikal aata he please help me.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Khujali means Skin Infection, may be bacterial, fungal, mites tick, lice etc, Pleasedo skin scraping exam, It may be even demodectic mange. Give Ivermecgtin Injeion s/c or its tablet one orally with gruel repeat after 10 days, Give Antihistaminics also. Possibley to give relief, steroids, ointment over the body & orally also. Skin ointment containing, antibacterial, antifungal, antimites are available apply for 10-15 days or more, Itywill give Good results.
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Hello My dog is mixed breed of lab and street and is 8 years old this year. Could you please let me know the precautions I should take ? He sheds hair every two months as well. But Is very active and runs a lot.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
For hair do regular brushing once a day and start some nutricoat tonic for hair. As considering age do blood test regular once in year.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

What shampoo should i use for dog ?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian,
You should use only dog shampoo. Human shampoo are not indicated for dogs because of different skin.
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I am giving treatment for parvo virus for my dog what are the symptoms for decreasing of virus.

BVSc
Veterinarian, Noida
If upto 24 hours, there is no vomiting and loose motion (enteritis, it means it dog has recovered from parvo infection.
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How can i loos my pet and wieght

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
LOT OF DIET FOODS AVAILABLE IN MARKET LIKE LIGHT DIET FOR DOGS IN HILLS SCIENCE PLAN,OR ADULT DIET IN CHICOPEE, .BASIC IS THEY ARE WELL BALANCED LOW PROTEIN AND LOW FAT CONTENT DIET ON REGULAR FEEDING FOR 6-10 MONTHS YOUR DOG LOOSES WEIGHT WITH OUT ANY SIDE EFFECT .
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

My lebra have loose motion and he is only 1 month old. We only gives milk him to drink.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should not use milk for feeding. You should use ceralac (samolac) or starter feed. Check for deworming.
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What can I do if my dogs fever is too high? Will benadryl help lower a fever? And I am not feeling well when I ate some oil pieces.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
What can I do if my dogs fever is too high? Will benadryl help lower a fever?
And I am not feeling well when I ate so...
Benadryl will not help lowering temp. You should take your pet to vet, because high fever is because of different reason like heat stroke, tick fever, infection etc.
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My dog is 16 year old yesterday he wake up in the evening his neck is tilted and silva comes out from his mouth frequently. Now doctors says its a paralysis attack. So they gave him some injections and ib drip. Of glucose and saline but the condition is still same he is not able to sleep, eat and walk he trying to walk but goes down after 4 -5 steps. Please advise something so he can recover fast.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your dog can have inner ear infection. Specially the side whr the head is tilted. Explains both salivation (vomiting sensation) and pain (tilting of head, loss of hunger, loss of sleep). Improper walking can happen if the balance between both of the ears is lost for any reason. Imagine your self rotating 20 times. In your dogz case it could an infection and no actual neurological issue. Kindly ask your doctor to do an otoscopy for the ear and send swab samples for culture test. Good luck.
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I have a 8 months old Labrador. Its fur is shedding so much, it got ticks about one Month ago, and left some spots without fur. I have used vitabest as suggested by my vet. Its of no use. Just for touching dog , my hands are full of its hair , Its shampoo is reltix. Please suggest how can I reduce its shedding. Thank you in advance.

BVSc, MVSc
Veterinarian, Aurangabad
Alopecia means hair fall is common in pets due to calcium multivitamin and protein deficient diet also at junction of two season due to moisture they shed off hairs so my advice is give liquid vencalp 7.5 ml, actipet 5 drops and high protein diet of your choice containing 28-32% protein try to maintain a dog dry and ectoparasite by dusting powder frescia.
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Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he tried and failed I took him to vet doc, But my rabbit died in Vet Clinic before Checking He Tried to stand too hard and Breathing by month but He couldn't stand for a minute and in two hours he died Please I want to know Why he died?

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he t...
The best way to know the reason in such cases to request vet to conduct posts mortum. As such symptoms can arise in multiple situation i. E. By making out which organs are affect vet can have rough idea about cause of death.
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My female dog is not at all eating well

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
Please give me a details report of your dog to get assessment of your pet . Simple words like above won't give me much knowledge to judge your case . Or privately come to private chat send your dog photos and write your query so that i can give suggestion based on facts
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I have this puppy with me from last 10-12 days. I adopted him. He's active and eats regularly. Pedigree twice or thrice a day and rest home food like chapati ,rice, biscuits,breads etc. He got 2 months old today, he's stomach is showing growth, but his neck and face are still the same they were on the day I brought him.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Get him checked by local vet the dog might need dewrming since you hv adopted him have a complete blood checked up so ytou vet can give you proper guidence on food and healthcare.
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Hey please any doctor help me my dog has eaten a frog and he is vomiting. please suggests me any fast treatment.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Dog is carnivores, it eats many kinds of animals, if given to it, but generally, it kills & does not eat. Vomition is an act of getting out the frog from stomach, it is good thing, I have not encountered such situations as like you, in my opinion, it may digest the frog, by its digestive juices, or more prompt, the frog should be removed by laparotomy means by surgical operation, it is done well. Frogs have obnoxious glands on its skin, due to which there will be vomiting,
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