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Dr. Anjali R. Patil

MBBS

Psychiatrist, Navi Mumbai

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Dr. Anjali R. Patil MBBS Psychiatrist, Navi Mumbai
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Anjali R. Patil
Dr. Anjali R. Patil is a renowned Psychiatrist in Sanpada, Navi Mumbai. She is a MBBS . You can consult Dr. Anjali R. Patil at Dr. R.N. Patil's Suraj Neurological & Multispeciality Hospital ( Suraj Hospital) in Sanpada, Navi Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Anjali R. Patil on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Psychiatrists online in Navi Mumbai. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dr. R.N. Patil's Suraj Neurological & Multispeciality Hospital ( Suraj Hospital)

Plot No. 1 & 1 A Sector - 15, Sanpada. Landmark: Sun Palm View Building & Opposite Palm Beach Road, Navi MumbaiNavi Mumbai Get Directions
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Suraj Hospital

Plot No. 1 & 1 A Sector - 15 Landmark : Sun Palm View Building & Opposite Palm Beach RoadNavi Mumbai Get Directions
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Sir I feel very stressed before exam. So I consult a doctor. He gave me cloba 5 and veniz xr 37.5. I fear these have side effects. And I also fear I I'll get used to it. I also feel sleepy after having these. Is it safe to have cloba5 and veniz xr.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Sir I feel very stressed before exam. So I consult a doctor. He gave me cloba 5 and veniz xr 37.5. I fear these have ...
Dear lybrate-user, Welcome to Lybrate. Tension during and before examination is called performance anxiety. To overcome exam related performance anxiety, you should know yourself, your subject, exams and your study patterns. Once you study systematically and to the point, there is no need to be panic before or during the exams. “Effective learning” techniques should help you. Take care.
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I am having depression n taking pills of it. But couldn't having proper sleep. I sleep only 3-4 hrs a day and then suddenly my sleep broke n Heart beat gets faster. What should I do tell me please.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
I am having depression n taking pills of it. But couldn't having proper sleep. I sleep only 3-4 hrs a day and then su...
It means, your antidepressants haven't been properly tailored for your as a person. Discuss these issues with your psychiatrist, and get the antidepressant dose or type revised to suit you, and for best functionality. Antidepressants vary on sedation quality, and different individuals also respond differently to them. But you need 7-9 hours, average 8 hours refreshing sleeper day. So discuss and get the prescription revised. All the best,
1 person found this helpful
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I am suffering from deep depression. I am not being able to handle stress of work, it's affecting my personal life, health as well as performance at work. I can't stop negative thoughts from overwhelming my mind. I am continuously under stress and fear of losing job. Please suggest me something to deal with this stress.

DRCH, BHMS
Homeopath, Bareilly
I am suffering from deep depression. I am not being able to handle stress of work, it's affecting my personal life, h...
1] do not take overburden of work, try to take help of others. 2] do not blame always yourself for any fault 3] do not try to finish all work at one time, divide your work according to priority. This will relax you a lot. 4] steal a small time for your self and do the work of your hobby in that time, that will give you pleasure. 5] when negative thoughts come then try to remember your happiest moment of life. 6] sleep at least 8 hours daily, have balanced diet, drink plenty of water and do meditation daily. 7] take homeopathic kali phos 6x, four tablet four times daily.
1 person found this helpful
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I am addicted to watch porn. I really want to avoid that but can't control myself. How to avoid that?

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I am addicted to watch porn.
I really want to avoid that but can't control myself.
How to avoid that?
Hi there, Signs and Symptoms of Porn Addiction Excessive viewing of pornography. The definition of “excessive” depends on what you consider healthy, or it is the point at which pornography starts to have a negative impact on some aspect of your (or someone else’s) life. Watching pornography interferes with normal daily behavior or responsibilities. More time spent watching pornography, or searching for more stimulating types of pornography, is needed to get you aroused or to climax, i. E. You develop a tolerance. There is a sense of emotional distress, or feeling of withdrawal, when porn use is stopped. Continued use pornography despite serious consequences (e. G. Loss of relationship or job, contraction of a sexually transmitted disease or “STD”). Compulsive masturbating. Sexual dysfunction (e. G. Impotence, premature ejaculation). Use of pornography negatively affects your relationships, for example: It is more difficult to become aroused by your partner. Romantic or sexual behavior between you and your partner changes (e. G. Becomes more aggressive, dominant, or emotionally disconnected). You watch porn as a way to alter your mood (e. G. Obtain a “high”) or avoid other unpleasant feelings, like anxiety or depression. What Causes Porn Addiction? Porn addiction, like other substances or “things” that people can become addicted to, can be understood through principles of “operant conditioning.” This is where a certain behavior, watching porn in this case, is “reinforced,” or rewarded, which in turn makes you want to do it again (and again). Lots of different things can be reinforcing, and thus influence our behavior, but porn can be especially reinforcing because the reward taps into a very basic instinctual drive—sex. Therefore, it is very easy to become addicted to porn—it is accessing a fundamental (and very enjoyable) natural drive. It is also much easier to obtain than going out and finding a “mate” to fulfill this drive. The problem occurs when seeking sexual pleasure becomes excessive, impulsive, or comes at the expense of other valued behaviors. Then we might say that one has a porn addiction. Other Factors Influencing Porn Addiction Biological You may have a genetic predisposition to impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, or sensation-seeking behavior. You may have a predisposition to other characteristics that are associated with sexual addiction, like anxiety or depression. As you might expect, higher levels of sex hormones like testosterone or estrogen can affect libido. If you are inclined towards impulsive behavior and have high levels of sex-related hormones, you may be more likely to engage in excessive or compulsive porn watching. Psychological Early-life environmental factors, including adverse events like abuse or exposure to sexual content, can contribute to some of the underlying traits involved in porn addiction behaviors. Mental health: Anxiety. Depression. Personality disorders. Poor impulse control. Performance anxiety. Other mental health issues might contribute to porn addiction behaviors. Social Rejection in relationships and social circles can lead to other, less healthy ways to find sexual gratification. Social isolation: Not only does social isolation increase one’s likelihood of seeking inappropriate ways of being sexually gratified, it also leads to a host of other problems—like depression and physical maladies—that can contribute to porn addictions or unhealthy sex behaviors. Peer influence: If others around you are doing something, you are more likely to do it, too. Having a friend, or a group of friends, for example, who engage in excessive porn viewing can influence your behavior. I hope this helps. Take care and have a lovely day!
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I am 45 Years old male. I have lost my 21 years old the only son 2 months back. I am depressed and do not want to talk anybody. I am in fear that any body can kill me, but why I don't know. I have just attempted suicide but unfortunately alive. Loss of appetite.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DPM Psychological Medicine
Psychiatrist, Kolkata
I am 45 Years old male. I have lost my 21 years old the only son 2 months back. I am depressed and do not want to tal...
Dear Mr. lybrate-user, I have no words to express my feelings towards you. At this time it is quiet natural to be depressed and morose. All these can happens as a grief reaction. But I think yours one is something more because a kind of psychotic symptoms is appearing which indicates that your grief has turned into severe depression. Also you had attempted suicide. I think you should not be alone at this stage, be always with your close family members. Try to ventilate yourself by remembering your beloved son. Pray for his soul. Involve yourself in some social works so that you can percolate your love for your son in between the children at his age. Try to sublimate your grief into a productive one. If still you can't find solution you can always take professional help of a grief counsellor or a Psychiatrist. Hope you will get some light in the sea of your sorrow.
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Hi I am affected by death illness I fear in some time the heart attack will come to me like that on that time I can't able to conce. on my studies and also in my work So how do I forget it please help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
Hi I am affected by death illness I fear in some time the heart attack will come to me like that on that time I can't...
Hi there How to Stop Worrying Self-Help Strategies for Relief from Anxieties, Worries, and Fears Self-Help for Anxiety Relief Worrying can be helpful when it spurs you to take action and solve a problem. But if you’re preoccupied with “what ifs” and worst-case scenarios, worry becomes a problem. Unrelenting doubts and fears can be paralyzing. They can sap your emotional energy, send your anxiety levels soaring, and interfere with your daily life. But chronic worrying is a mental habit that can be broken. You can train your brain to stay calm and look at life from a more positive perspective. Why is it so hard to stop worrying? No one likes the way constant worrying makes you feel, so why is it so difficult to stop? The answer lies in the beliefs—both negative and positive—you have about worrying. On the negative side, you may believe that your constant worrying is going to spiral completely out of control, drive you crazy, or damage your health. On the positive side, you may believe that your worrying helps you avoid bad things, prepare for the worst, or come up with solutions. You may even believe that worrying shows you’re a caring and conscientious person. Negative beliefs, or worrying about worrying, add to your anxiety and keep it going (much in the same way worrying about getting to sleep often keeps you awake). But positive beliefs about worrying can be even more damaging. It’s tough to break the worry habit if you believe that your worrying protects you. In order to stop worry and anxiety for good, you must give up your belief that worrying serves a positive purpose. Once you realize that worrying is the problem, not the solution, you can regain control of your worried mind. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #1: Create a worry period It’s tough to be productive in your daily life when anxiety and worry are dominating your thoughts. But what can you do? Telling yourself to stop worrying doesn’t work—at least not for long. You can distract yourself for a moment, but you can’t banish anxious thoughts for good. In fact, trying to do so often makes them stronger and more persistent. You can test this out for yourself. Close your eyes and picture a pink elephant. Once you can see itin your mind, stop thinking about it. Whatever you do, for the next 60 seconds, don’t think about pink elephants! How did you do? Did thoughts of pink elephants keep popping in your brain? Why trying to stop anxious thoughts doesn’t work “Thought stopping” backfires because it forces you to pay extra attention to the very thought you want to avoid. You always have to be watching for it, and this very emphasis makes it seem even more important. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do to control worry. You just need a different approach. This is where the strategy of postponing worrying comes in. Rather than trying to stop or get rid of an anxious thought, give yourself permission to have it, but put off dwelling on it until later. Learn to postpone worrying Create a “worry period.” Choose a set time and place for worrying. It should be the same every day (e.g. In the living room from 5: 00 to 5: 20 p.m.) and early enough that it won’t make you anxious right before bedtime. During your worry period, you’re allowed to worry about whatever’s on your mind. The rest of the day, however, is a worry-free zone. Postpone your worry. If an anxious thought or worry comes into your head during the day, make a brief note of it and then continue about your day. Remind yourself that you’ll have time to think about it later, so there’s no need to worry about it right now. Go over your “worry list” during the worry period. If the thoughts you wrote down are still bothering you, allow yourself to worry about them, but only for the amount of time you’ve specified for your worry period. If they don’t seem important any more, cut your worry period short and enjoy the rest of your day. Postponing worrying is effective because it breaks the habit of dwelling on worries when you’ve got other things to do, yet there’s no struggle to suppress the thought or judge it. You simply save it for later. And as you develop the ability to postpone your anxious thoughts, you’ll start to realize that you have more control than you think. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #2: Ask yourself if the problem is solvable Research shows that while you’re worrying, you temporarily feel less anxious. Running over the problem in your head distracts you from your emotions and makes you feel like you’re getting something accomplished. But worrying and problem solving are two very different things. Problem solving involves evaluating a situation, coming up with concrete steps for dealing with it, and then putting the plan into action. Worrying, on the other hand, rarely leads to solutions. No matter how much time you spend dwelling on worst-case scenarios, you’re no more prepared to deal with them should they actually happen. Distinguish between solvable and unsolvable worries If a worry pops into your head, start by asking yourself whether the problem is something you can actually solve. The following questions can help: Is the problem something you’re currently facing, rather than an imaginary what-if? If the problem is an imaginary what-if, how likely is it to happen? Is your concern realistic? Can you do something about the problem or prepare for it, or is it out of your control? Productive, solvable worries are those you can take action on right away. For example, if you’re worried about your bills, you could call your creditors to see about flexible payment options. Unproductive, unsolvable worries are those for which there is no corresponding action. “What if I get cancer someday?” or “What if my kid gets into an accident?” If the worry is solvable, start brainstorming. Make a list of all the possible solutions you can think of. Try not to get too hung up on finding the perfect solution. Focus on the things you have the power to change, rather than the circumstances or realities beyond your control. After you’ve evaluated your options, make a plan of action. Once you have a plan and start doing something about the problem, you’ll feel much less worried. Dealing with unsolvable worries But what if the worry isn’t something you can solve? If you’re a chronic worrier, the vast majority of your anxious thoughts probably fall in this camp. In such cases, it’s important to tune into your emotions. As previously mentioned, worrying helps you avoid unpleasant emotions. Worrying keeps you in your head, thinking about how to solve problems rather than allowing yourself to feel the underlying emotions. But you can’t worry your emotions away. While you’re worrying, your feelings are temporarily suppressed, but as soon as you stop, they bounce back. And then, you start worrying about your feelings: “What’s wrong with me? I shouldn’t feel this way!” The only way out of this vicious cycle is by learning to embrace your feelings. This may seem scary at first because of negative beliefs you have about emotions. For example, you may believe that you should always be rational and in control, that your feelings should always make sense, or that you shouldn’t feel certain emotions, such as fear or anger. The truth is that emotions—like life—are messy. They don’t always make sense and they’re not always pleasant. But as long as you can accept your feelings as part of being human, you’ll be able to experience them without becoming overwhelmed and learn how to use them to your advantage. The following tips will help you find a better balance between your intellect and your emotions. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #3: Challenge anxious thoughts If you suffer from chronic anxiety and worries, chances are you look at the world in ways that make it seem more dangerous than it really is. For example, you may overestimate the possibility that things will turn out badly, jump immediately to worst-case scenarios, or treat every negative thought as if it were fact. You may also discredit your own ability to handle life’s problems, assuming you’ll fall apart at the first sign of trouble. These irrational, pessimistic attitudes are known as cognitive distortions. Although cognitive distortions aren’t based on reality, they’re not easy to give up. Often, they’re part of a lifelong pattern of thinking that’s become so automatic you’re not even completely aware of it. In order to break these bad thinking habits and stop the worry and anxiety they bring, you must retrain your brain. Start by identifying the frightening thought, being as detailed as possible about what scares or worries you. Then, instead of viewing your thoughts as facts, treat them as hypotheses you’re testing out. As you examine and challenge your worries and fears, you’ll develop a more balanced perspective. Stop worrying by questioning the anxious thought What’s the evidence that the thought is true? That it’s not true? Is there a more positive, realistic way of looking at the situation? What’s the probability that what I’m scared of will actually happen? If the probability is low, what are some more likely outcomes? Is the thought helpful? How will worrying about it help me and how will it hurt me? What would I say to a friend who had this worry? Cognitive Distortions that Add to Anxiety, Worry, and Stress All-or-nothing thinking – Looking at things in black-or-white categories, with no middle ground. “If I fall short of perfection, I’m a total failure.” Overgeneralization – Generalizing from a single negative experience, expecting it to hold true forever. “I didn’t get hired for the job. I’ll never get any job.” The mental filter – Focusing on the negatives while filtering out all the positives. Noticing the one thing that went wrong, rather than all the things that went right. Diminishing the positive – Coming up with reasons why positive events don’t count. “I did well on the presentation, but that was just dumb luck.” Jumping to conclusions – Making negative interpretations without actual evidence. You act like a mind reader, “I can tell she secretly hates me.” Or a fortune teller, “I just know something terrible is going to happen.” Catastrophizing – Expecting the worst-case scenario to happen. “The pilot said we’re in for some turbulence. The plane’s going to crash!” Emotional reasoning – Believing that the way you feel reflects reality. “I feel frightened right now. That must mean I’m in real physical danger.” 'Shoulds’ and ‘should-nots’ – Holding yourself to a strict list of what you should and shouldn’t do and beating yourself up if you break any of the rules Labeling – Labeling yourself based on mistakes and perceived shortcomings. “I’m a failure; an idiot; a loser.” Personalization – Assuming responsibility for things that are outside your control. “It’s my fault my son got in an accident. I should have warned him to drive carefully in the rain.” Worry and anxiety self-help tip #4: Accept uncertainty The inability to tolerate uncertainty plays a huge role in anxiety and worry. Chronic worriers can’t stand doubt or unpredictability. They need to know with 100 percent certainty what’s going to happen. Worrying is seen as a way to predict what the future has in store—a way to prevent unpleasant surprises and control the outcome. The problem is, it doesn’t work. Thinking about all the things that could go wrong doesn’t make life any more predictable. You may feel safer when you’re worrying, but it’s just an illusion. Focusing on worst-case scenarios won’t keep bad things from happening. It will only keep you from enjoying the good things you have in the present. So if you want to stop worrying, start by tackling your need for certainty and immediate answers. Challenging intolerance of uncertainty: The key to anxiety relief Ask yourself the following questions and write down your responses. See if you can come to an understanding of the disadvantages and problems of being intolerant of uncertainty. Is it possible to be certain about everything in life? What are the advantages of requiring certainty, versus the disadvantages? Or, how is needing certainty in life helpful and unhelpful? Do you tend to predict bad things will happen just because they are uncertain? Is this a reasonable thing to do? What is the likelihood of positive or neutral outcomes? Is it possible to live with the small chance that something negative may happen, given its likelihood is very low? Adapted from: Accepting Uncertainty, Centre for Clinical Interventions Worry and anxiety self-help tip # 5: Be aware of how others affect you How you feel is affected by the company you keep, whether you’re aware of it or not. Studies show that emotions are contagious. We quickly “catch” moods from other people—even from strangers who never speak a word (e.g. The terrified woman sitting by you on the plane; the fuming man in the checkout line). The people you spend a lot of time with have an even greater impact on your mental state. Keep a worry diary. You may not be aware of how people or situations are affecting you. Maybe this is the way it’s always been in your family, or you’ve been dealing with the stress so long that it feels normal. Try keeping a worry diary for a week or so. Every time you start to worry, jot down the thought and what triggered it. Over time, you’ll start to see patterns. Spend less time with people who make you anxious. Is there someone in your life who drags you down or always seems to leave you feeling stressed? Think about cutting back on the time you spend with that person or establish healthier relationship boundaries. For example, you might set certain topics off-limits, if you know that talking about them with that person makes you anxious. Choose your confidantes carefully. Know who to talk to about situations that make you anxious. Some people will help you gain perspective, while others will feed into your worries, doubts, and fears. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #6: Practice mindfulness Man meditating Worrying is usually focused on the future—on what might happen and what you’ll do about it. The centuries-old practice of mindfulness can help you break free of your worries by bringing your attention back to the present. In contrast to the previous techniques of challenging your anxious thoughts or postponing them to a worry period, this strategy is based on observing and then letting them go. Together, they can help you identify where your thinking is causing problems, while helping you get in touch with your emotions. Acknowledge and observe your anxious thoughts and feelings. Don’t try to ignore, fight, or control them like you usually would. Instead, simply observe them as if from an outsider’s perspective, without reacting or judging. Let your worries go. Notice that when you don’t try to control the anxious thoughts that pop up, they soon pass, like clouds moving across the sky. It’s only when you engage your worries that you get stuck. Stay focused on the present. Pay attention to the way your body feels, the rhythm of your breathing, your ever-changing emotions, and the thoughts that drift across your mind. If you find yourself getting stuck on a particular thought, bring your attention back to the present moment. Using mindfulness meditation to stay focused on the present is a simple concept, but it takes practice to reap the benefits. At first, you’ll probably find that your mind keeps wandering back to your worries. Try not to get frustrated. Each time you draw your focus back to the present, you’re reinforcing a new mental habit that will help you break free of the negative worry cycle. I hope this helps. Take care
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From last three years I have been suffering from OCD. Though I have been able pass my last exam with good marks .I feel I can not concentrate on studies. Idea of visiting a foreign country some times comes to my mind then I continue to repent for hours for not havhig been sent UK for further studies by my parents. Even I get angry on them. Some times other things come mind which remain for hours and make me disturbed Kindly help me.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user, Your problem is not OCD. It is more lack of determination. Anger and aggression are emotions. Anger comes when you become irritated. Irritation happens when you don't like something, or when something is repeated. As anger is an emotion, it should be vent out. You should be able to throw anger out instead of controlling it. But more perfect will be, know the frustrating situations and stop being emotional. If practiced properly, you will not get irritated at those circumstances at all. Those techniques are much easier to understand. Take care.
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I have not got job. That's why I feel great tension especially when I go to bed to sleep. Sometimes it disturbs my sleep. So what will I do?

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
I have not got job. That's why I feel great tension especially when I go to bed to sleep. Sometimes it disturbs my sl...
Hi lybrate-user. Do not worry you will surely get a job, get yourself organized exercise daily for an hour to beat stress as it produces endorphins which are happy hormones, eat balanced diet, take bath before going to sleep. Also, organize your activities, look up for work, keep searching, realize your weakness and strength work on your weakness your difficulties you are encountering in clearing interview. Talk to a professional. All the best.
2 people found this helpful
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Hello. I am. 18 years old and. I am in depression. My mental health is not so good. I am suffering from headache. What I do. Plz give full daily routine chart for this.

Master Of Science In Counseling & Psychotherapy
Psychologist, Bangalore
Hello. I am. 18 years old and. I am in depression. My mental health is not so good. I am suffering from headache. Wha...
Hi lybrate-user, start your day with outdoor walk, deep breathing exercise, good diet, reading inspiring/self help books, listening to music, talking to your friends, feel happy for all your positive qualities, good friends and supportive people. Have a good sleep relaxing your mind. Have a talk with a counselor for identifying your feelings and engage yourself in positive things.
2 people found this helpful
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I am not able to concentrate on studies. I used to do it better. What should I do?

BHMS
Homeopath,
Dear lybrate user, take homoeopathic anacardium 200, 5 drops, thrice daily, in empty stomach. Also take homoeopathic mother tincture ashwagandha q, 30 drops, thrice daily, after meals, in a cup of water.
5 people found this helpful
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I am taking quetiapine for 10 years and I felt depression for 10 years. How can I get rid of it. I feel boring every time.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
I am taking quetiapine for 10 years and I felt depression for 10 years. How can I get rid of it. I feel boring every ...
You are being treated for a serious condition and must periodically get the medication reviewed. I am sure you are one of those who has not combined medication with therapy. This can make it difficult for you to recover well. Do meet with a counselor and develop certain coping skills and techniques which can substantiate the medication well for faster recovery.
2 people found this helpful
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I constantly keep thinking and dreaming about something. I'm not free even a second. Because of this im not in this world. I must gain consciousness and be in this world. I must stop thinking unnecessarily. My mind must be active. Please suggest me something to create alertness.

M.sc dietitics and food service management, Diabetes educator
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Bhopal
I constantly keep thinking and dreaming about something. I'm not free even a second. Because of this im not in this w...
Do regular exercise. Stop eating junk and processed food. Take 2 banana with warm milk in the morning. Include protein rich food in your diet like soyabean, sattu with milk, sprouts, milk and milk products, combination of cereal and pulses, take healthy and heavy breakfast. You can consult me online on Lybrate I will give you diet chart.
3 people found this helpful
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8 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Disease!

MBBS, Basic Life Support (B.L.S), Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE)
General Physician, Bangalore
8 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Disease!

Are you experiencing memory loss? Your memory changes often as you grow, but memory loss which causes disruption of your daily life is not a part of ageing. It may be a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common type of dementia. Dementia refers to a slow decline in your memory, thinking, judgement and reasoning skills.

Alzheimer’s is a fatal disorder, which may result in the loss of brain function. It may be hard to differentiate between the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and normal age-related changes. For proper identification of symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease, you should know about the warning signs. They are as follows:

  1. Memory loss which disrupts daily life: Forgetting of information learnt recently is a common sign of Alzheimer’ disease, especially in the early stage. Forgetting important events or dates and asking for something over and over are also likely signs.
  2. Difficulty in planning and solving problems: Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow any plan or work associated with numbers. Trouble regarding keeping track of bills and following a particular recipe are common examples. A person may also face problems with concentration.
  3. Difficulty in completing familiar tasks: Another warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease is when a person cannot complete simple and familiar daily tasks. Problems like driving to a known location, remembering the rules of a game or managing budget are likely.
  4. Confusion regarding time or place: People with Alzheimer’s disease may lose track of seasons, dates and the passage of time. They may not understand situations when they do not happen immediately.
  5. Problems in understanding visual images: Vision problems may be an indication of Alzheimer’s in some people. Difficulty in reading, judgement of distance and the determination of color may occur which cause problems during driving.
  6. Problems in speaking or writing: Another sign of Alzheimer’s disease is when a person has problems in following or joining a conversation. They may pause while conversing and have no idea about how to continue with it. Problems with vocabulary, finding proper words and calling things by a wrong name are more warning symptoms.
  7. Misplacing stuff and being unable to retrace steps: A person with Alzheimer’s may develop a tendency of keeping things in unusual places. They end up losing the things as they cannot go back and retrace where they kept something. They may also accuse people of stealing their things.
  8. Decreased sense of judgement: Another important warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease is a decreased sense of judgement. Changes in decision making and judgement are likely to develop in a person. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a General Physician.
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one person treated me badly. That incident is getting reminded in my every now and then. Because of which iam not able to concentrate on my job and daily routine. what should I do to over come this problem.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
Your obsession is unnecessary. You must quickly get rid of that experience, and either talk to that person and tell him what you are going through or talk to a counselor to sort it out. That person may have had good intentions when he treated you like that. If you silently suffer, you will feel more and more dejected and become terribly dysfunctional. When we give such incidents so much of power, they will affect our self-esteem, self-confidence and our self-image. You stand to lose too much around a single incident. You have made yourself very vulnerable. Go out and meet people, visit a gym regularly, do some personality development courses, study more and equip yourself to such an extent that you give a boost to your confidence. That incident will then fade away into oblivion forever.
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Causes And Symptoms Of Balance Disorder!

MBBS, MS - ENT
ENT Specialist, Ghaziabad
Causes And Symptoms Of Balance Disorder!

Balance disorders are a combination of physiological factors that can make you feel unsteady or dizzy. While sitting, standing or lying down, you may feel as if you are floating, moving, or spinning and you may feel dizzy and dazed for the time being. This disorder can intervene in your daily activities of life, and can even lead to falls and accidents, which may cause you to end up with fractures and other types of injuries.

What causes balance disorder?

A combination and coordination of many body systems such as muscles, bones, vision, the balancing organ within the ear, heart and nerves help maintain normal balance. Dysfunction of these systems can lead you to encounter balance problems. Balance disorders can be caused by many types of conditions.

Some of the causes of the disorder are:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): This occurs due to dislodged or displaced calcium crystals in the inner ear, which help you maintain balance. It is the most commonly found cause of vertigo. A spinning sensation while turning in bed is a common sign.

  1. Migraines: Migraines are a general cause of dizziness. Sensitivity to motion can also be caused by migraines. It can also lead to motion sickness, which is dizziness experienced when traveling in boats, cars or airplanes.
  2. Head injury: A severe concussion can also cause vertigo.
  3. Ramsay Hunt syndrome: Commonly known as zoster otitis, this condition affects the nerves close to the ears. It can be attributed to hearing loss, vertigo and pain in the ear.
  4. Vestibular problems and nerve damage: Damaged nerves in the legs can cause difficulty in movement and locomotion. Abnormalities and dysfunctions in the inner ear can lead to a sensation of dizziness and a heavy head.

How do you know if you have balance disorder?

Some of the characteristic symptoms of this condition include:

- Blurred vision
- Nausea and vomiting
- Diarrhea
- Blood pressure
- Fatigue
- Depression and anxiety
- Psychological disorientation
- Fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Ent Specialist.

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Hello Dr, I am 47 year old long time have fobia can't walk alone I am always afraid going to fall down if I go to market feel very nerves if you can help me Thanks.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Hello Dr, I am  47 year old long time have fobia can't walk alone I am always afraid going to fall down if I go to ma...
Dear Lybrate user. I understand. Some physical diseases are thought to be prone to be made worse by mental factors such as stress and anxiety. At any given time, a person's mental state can affect the degree of severity of a physical disease. Physical symptoms that are caused by mental factors are also called somatization or somatoform disorders. I think your problem is PSYCHOSOMATIC PROBLEM. I suggest online counseling and psychotherapy. Take care.
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My voice sounds soft and different. I would to have a deep and authoritative voice. Voice therapy or any other solution for this.

Master of science in audiology, Bachalor in audiology and speech
Speech Therapist, Delhi
Hello Mr. lybrate-user, change in voice calls for professional help. If you had deep voice that means you must be trying to lower down the throat and speak. If you were changing your voice. It can lead to some problem in voice box. First thing throat should be examine and than we can reach on the conclusion. But for now take deep breath through nose and than talk, see if there is some betterment in your voice. If not than meet speech therapist.
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I'm a woman of 50 years old married for 34 years with 3 children. Two of my older children settled in life. My hubby is 58 years old and self employed. When ever we get in argument I feel like walk away from home and live separately. When ever I feel so strongly I go to my parents place to stay for a month or two and come back home. What should I do? Is it right to live alone or should I compromise for ever and live with him? He is not bad and loves me. I did not have physical relationship with him since 5 yrs. Please give me right advice. Thanks.

Fellow,European Committee of Sexual Medicine, Diploma in Psychological Medicine, M.B.,B.S
Sexologist, Jaipur
Hi what you are experiencing is normal in most long term relationship. Arguments will always take place if two persons live together. Most important is finding ways to get out of the post argument depression you can fix a couple of hours for a no talking period but never ever remain away regularly after fights similarly must plan some times together, may be outings improve intimacy must continue touch, cuddling or kisses no sex should not imply no intimacy
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