Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Aditi Deshmukh

Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Aditi Deshmukh Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Aditi Deshmukh
Dr. Aditi Deshmukh is an experienced Veterinarian in Vashi, Navi Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Aditi Deshmukh personally at Veterinary & Pet Services in Vashi, Navi Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Aditi Deshmukh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Navi Mumbai. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Aditi Deshmukh

Veterinary & Pet Services

JN-4/2/7, Sector 9, Vashi, Navi MumbaiNavi Mumbai Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Aditi Deshmukh

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My 2 month old puppy seems very dazed and disoriented after a week's treatment of Melonex 5mg. He's falling again and again in sleep. Really worried Kindly help

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please taken to vet and rule out parvo viral infection and start fluids immediately as puppy wont survive much as there body weight is very poor.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a black rabbit and he's 2 years old, my question is how can I help him wid his loose motions.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Please provide lacto bacillus powder (sporolac sachets) in his diet. You can add it in water or can feed directly also. Don't give any oral antibiotics as these may aggravate the condition. Thank you.
3 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

MVSc
Veterinarian,
8 Tips To Keep Your Pets Calm During Diwali Time

Cracker sounds are a stress for most pets – and can leave owners pretty frazzled too.

According to figures from the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) , 45% of dogs show signs of fear when they hear loud bangs.

And 65% of owners feel anxious for their pet as the bangers go off.

But with Diwali celebrations starting, planning can take the stress out during crackers bursting. Here’s ten things you can do to help:

1. Create a safe den or hideaway, like this cat tent, right. Before fireworks night, put treats, toys and blankets there so pets associate it with positive experiences. The RSPCA’s Professor Daniel Mills said: “Dogs learn this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks go off they may go there because they know no harm will come to them.”

2. Keep pets indoors. Cats should stay in and dogs walked in daylight.

3. Close curtains and play music or leave the TV on to muffle firework noise.

4. Protect small animals. Rabbits, guinea pigs or birds should be given extra bedding to burrow in and have an area of their cage or hutch covered with blankets.

5. Try letting pets smell essential oils – they can help to relax and soothe them.Use plug in pheromone diffusers.

6. Try calming supplements in their food.

7. Play with pets so they are tired and may sleep through the day.

8. Don’t punish a pet for reacting to noise – it will make things worse.

I have a pet of breed german shepherd he is not able to excrete properly his diet is good wht shd i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be digestion complication . Please take it to a vet and also concentrate fibre content in the dog as it will also lead to such compliances
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi , i have a dog age 5 Yrs .Lab . His hair shedding alot and its almost gone near genitalia .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please consult a vet it might because of skin infection or else send me photos so could suggest first aid . Still consulting a vet near by is appreciable.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
What does humanizing your dog mean?

Talking to your dog like he/she is a person.
Treating your dog like he/she is a person.
Allowing dogs to do what they want because it will hurt their "feelings"
Dressing them up in little doggie clothes.
Remember, humanizing your dog is fulfilling your own human needs, not your dogs. Humanizing dogs does more harm than good.
9 people found this helpful
View All Feed