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Dr. Y.T.Mehtha

Pediatrician, Mumbai

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Dr. Y.T.Mehtha Pediatrician, Mumbai
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Y.T.Mehtha
Dr. Y.T.Mehtha is a popular Pediatrician in Ghatkopar West, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Y.T.Mehtha personally at Bhanushali Nursing Home in Ghatkopar West, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Y.T.Mehtha and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English
Hindi

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Bhanushali Nursing Home

1st Floor, Avantika Apartment, New Maneklal Estate, Ghatkopar West. Landmark:-Opposite Abhyudaya Bank, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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Master Of Science ( Home Science) , B.Sc
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
Serve food in smaller portions. Do not demand or reward “a clean plate.” Let your child ask for more if he or she is still hungry.
4 people found this helpful

Please help me out to increase my lactation I'm a feeding mom My milk supply suddenly dropped And baby isn't gaining weight. I'm a working mom.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FCPS, DGO, Diploma of the Faculty of Family Planning (DFFP)
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
First meet Paediatrician and confirm that your lactation is less. Paediatrician can advise you for lactation as well as advise feeding for baby.
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Doctor, I have a daughter. I have small breast so less milk. How does fill my breast?

M.B.S.(HOMEO), MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Visakhapatnam
Fatty tissue is what gives the breast its rounded shape and protects the internal structures from injury. The amount of fatty tissue and the size of the breast are not related to the ability to produce milk, so small breasted women are just as capable of adequate milk production as the more amply endowed. Some of the most copious milk producers that I have encountered – including mothers of twins – have had very small breasts. When you’re lactating, your breasts produce milk constantly, and it accumulates in the milk ducts between feedings. When your baby nurses, he will empty out most of the milk in the breast – usually about 75 – 80%. Breastfeeding moms can produce an equal amount of milk over a 24 hour period regardless of the size of their breasts, but women with large breasts may have more ‘storage capacity’ than those with smaller breasts. That means that that a large breast may store more milk in reserve between feedings – sometimes several times as much as a small breast. For example: If a large breast contains 6 oz, and the baby takes 4 oz from each side at a feeding (8 oz total), that leaves about 2 oz in each breast (4 oz total) in reserve for the next feeding – in addition to the milk produced while the baby nurses. Smaller breasts may contain 4 oz in on each side. If the baby takes 3 oz on each side (6 oz total) per feeding, that leaves about 1 oz in reserve in each breast (2 oz total) for the next feeding, in addition to milk produced while the baby nurses. Because of this individual ‘storage capacity’, women with smaller breasts may need to nurse more often, because their babies may take in less per milk per feeding. Women with larger breasts may deliver more milk during each feeding, so the baby doesn’t need to nurse as often in a 24 hour period – or the baby may only take one breast per feeding.
1 person found this helpful
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How to Protect Your Child From Lung Infection

FELLOWSHIP IN PCCM, FELLOW-PEDIATRIC FLEXIBLE BRONCHOSCOPY, FELLOWSHIP IN PEDIATRIC CARDIAC CRITICAL CARE, D.C.H., M.B.B.S
Pediatrician, Ahmedabad
How to Protect Your Child From Lung Infection

Children are found to be more prone to falling sick than adults. This is not only due to their lower immunity, but also the carelessness of the elders around. Since it is not expected of children to take precautions, it is up to the parents to take care of that. The following is a list of ways to protect your child from one of the most common kinds of illness encountered by children lung infection.

  1. Avoiding smoking in front of children: It is a well established fact that passive smoking or being in proximity to a smoker is almost as harmful as smoking itself. Parents who smoke in the presence of their children are putting the latter at the risk of lung infections and various serious lung conditions. Thus, children should be kept away from tobacco smoke as much as possible.
  2. Limited use of mosquito repellents near children: Mosquito repellents have been known to cause asthmatic attacks in small children. The liquidators and the mosquito coils contain chemicals which should not be inhaled, especially by children.
  3. Avoiding air pollution: Air pollution causes irreparable damage to the lungs of children. Harmful gases and smoke from vehicles can lead to asthma, or even lung cancer, in children. To avoid this as much as possible, children should be made to wear pollution masks, especially while travelling through busy streets with heavy traffic.
  4. Avoiding objects which can cause allergic reactions or act as triggers: The triggers vary from one child to another and for some, there might not be any trigger at all. However, it is the responsibility of the parents to keep the children away from things, which might cause allergic reactions. Examples of such objects are, certain fabrics, fur of animals, incense sticks, perfumes, talcum powder, citrus food, peanut, pollen, flowers, dust, fumes and so on.
  5. Teaching them personal hygiene: Teaching children to carry handkerchiefs, cover their mouths while coughing or sneezing, washing their hands properly, and other good hygiene habits, can combat lung infections to a great extent, as these help prevent the spread of germs.
  6. Timely vaccinations: Proper vaccination acts as a precautionary measure for lung infections in children. Thus, parents should get their children vaccinated after consulting the respective physician.
4749 people found this helpful

Healthy Sex Talk to educate Kids of ages 5-12

MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Agra
Healthy Sex Talk to educate Kids of ages 5-12
A list of parenting action items, created in the hope that we can raise a generation of children who have less rape and sexual assault in their lives.

Teaching kids to respect one another’s space, from even a very young age, helps grow empathy.

1. Teach kids that the way their bodies are changing is great, but can sometimes be confusing. The way you talk about these changes—whether it’s loose teeth or pimples and pubic hair—will show your willingness to talk about other sensitive subjects.
Be scientific, direct, and answer any questions your child may have, without shame or embarrassment. Again, if your first instinct is to shush them because you are embarrassed, practice until you can act like it’s no big deal with your kid.

2. Encourage them to talk about what feels good and what doesn’t. Do you like to be tickled? Do you like to be dizzy? What else? What doesn’t feel good? Being sick, maybe? Or when another kid hurts you? Leave space for your child to talk about anything else that comes to mind.

3. Remind your child that everything they’re going through is natural, growing up happens to all of us.

4. Teach kids how to use safe-words during play, and help them negotiate a safe-word to use with their friends.
This is necessary because many kids like to disappear deep into their pretend worlds together, such as playing war games where someone gets captured, or putting on a stage play where characters may be arguing.
At this age, saying “no” may be part of the play, so they need to have one word that will stop all activity.

5. Teach kids to stop their play every once in a while to check in with one another. Teach them to take a T.O. (time out) every so often, to make sure everyone’s feeling okay.

6. Encourage kids to watch each others’ facial expressions during play to be sure everyone’s happy and on the same page.

7. Help kids interpret what they see on the playground and with friends. Ask what they could do or could have done differently to help. Play a “rewind” game, if they come home and tell you about seeing bullying.
“You told me a really hard story about your friend being hit. I know you were scared to step in. If we were to rewind the tape, what do you think you could do to help next time if you see it happen?” Improvise everything from turning into a superhero to getting a teacher.
Give them big props for talking to you about tough subjects.

8. Don’t tease kids for their boy-girl friendships, or for having crushes. Whatever they feel is okay. If their friendship with someone else seems like a crush, don’t mention it. You can ask them open questions like, “How is your friendship with Sarah going?” and be prepared to talk—or not talk—about it.

9. Teach children that their behaviors affect others. You can do this in simple ways, anywhere. Ask them to observe how people respond when other people make noise or litter. Ask them what they think will happen as a result. Will someone else have to clean up the litter? Will someone be scared? Explain to kids how the choices they make affect others and talk about when are good times to be loud, and what are good spaces to be messy.

10. Teach kids to look for opportunities to help. Can they pick up the litter? Can they be more quiet so as not to interrupt someone’s reading on the bus? Can they offer to help carry something or hold a door open? All of this teaches kids that they have a role to play in helping ease both proverbial and literal loads.

Hi, doctor my baby boy was 9 month old he got cold he has running nose what drops should I used him please suggest thank you.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
Hi, doctor my baby boy was 9 month old he got cold he has running nose what drops should I used him please suggest th...
You can instill saline nasal drop in each nostrils 3 times in a day. If no relief, consult your pediatrician.
1 person found this helpful
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MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Faridabad
Parents must get across the idea that" I love you always, but sometimes I do not love your behavior.
1 person found this helpful

My daughter is 3 years old. I have given all the vaccines as per schedule till date. Are vaccines for flu and pneumonia absolutely required to give her?

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
My daughter is 3 years old. I have given all the vaccines as per schedule till date. Are vaccines for flu and pneumon...
Pneumococcal vaccine is now recommended for routine use as per iap and hence should be given. Flu vaccine is recommended for high risk individuals like those with asthma, allergy, frequent episodes of cough and cold and so on.
1 person found this helpful
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What is the proper diet of 7 month old babies which milk is best for baby except mother feeding. & how we can gain weight for our baby.

BHMS
Homeopath, Chennai
What is the proper diet of 7 month old babies which milk is best for baby except mother feeding. & how we can gain we...
At 7 and 8 months most babies need: Solid foods two to three times a day, plus about 24 to 32 ounces of breast milk or formula in a 24-hour period. About 14 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period – this includes nighttime sleep and naps.
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