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Dr. Vaishali B More

Pediatrician, Mumbai

Dr. Vaishali B More Pediatrician, Mumbai
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Vaishali B More
Dr. Vaishali B More is one of the best Pediatricians in Mumbai, Mumbai. You can consult Dr. Vaishali B More at Tara Clinic in Mumbai, Mumbai. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Vaishali B More on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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201, M-5, C-WING, PALM ACRES CHS, PRATIKSHA NAGAR, SION, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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my sone is surfing from Autism , he is now 5 years old but could not speek properly, is ther any medicine help him

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Patna
Homeopathy is not a remedy of autism. Autism a developmental disorder which can be well tackled with regular training and behavioural therapy under the guidance of a psychiatrist. Dont waste your time as parents can be the best therapist and trainer with little professional guidance.
2 people found this helpful
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My son is 3 years old. He speaks only words. He will ask for water or food. Toys. He knows alphabet, colors and numbers. He can tell few objects. He is good in physical activities. He has does not form sentences yet. Is it normal for 3 years old kid? What can I do to enhance his speech.

Pediatrician, Kaithal
My son is 3 years old. He speaks only words. He will ask for water or food. Toys. He knows alphabet, colors and numbe...
If child is mentally normal and having normal hearing, then you should wait for some more time. Be careful and do not over stress your child regarding speech
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My baby is 7 months and his eye is becoming red no idea what happened black portion seems bit whitish from one end Kindly suggest cure Weeping as well no having least diet.

MBBS, M.D.(Gen.Medicine)
General Physician, Chennai
My baby is 7 months and his eye is becoming red no idea what happened black portion seems bit whitish from one end
Ki...
From your description, it looks like your baby is suffering from infection of eye, possibly Conjunctivitis. Before it becomes worse or spreads to the other eye, it is better to take the baby to a Paediatrician and get proper advice.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello sir, My son is 7 years old he wets his bed daily what to do? Please tell me.

MD, MBBS
Pediatrician, Bangalore
Remove feer from his mind may be family members, school teacher friends, seriels or any kind, don't beat or scold for this don't talk to others for this, less liquids 3 hrs before sleep. Make to pass urine at night also by awaking. Mostly this helps.
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I am a self employ and my question is how to growth health of a 6 month child with out milk.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Tumkur
I am a self employ and my question is how to growth health of a 6 month child with out milk.
You can gradually start solid foods one after the other and give calcium supplementation. But better to continue milk for some more time.
2 people found this helpful
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Innovative Tips to Make Your Kids eat Healthier Food

B.Sc. Food & Nutrition, M.Sc. Food & Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Bangalore

We all know the rules avoid junk food, eat healthy, say no to fizzy drinks and finish your veggies. But do kids really listen? who says eating right needs to be followed by the book! parents stress and worry about their children's bad eating habits day and night, just to find their child pigging out on that packet of chips you thought you managed to hide. Instead of setting rules for what he/she can or cannot eat (and we all know how much children love rules) why not provide them with options (you could even trick them into believing its totally unhealthy) they'll gobble up happily.

Say yes to junk food:
There is no parent who could eat healthy all the time, so how can you expect your kids to do the same? if they want chocolate, melt some rich chocolate in milk and serve it to them as hot chocolate. When your child demands choco chip cookies, try making them at home with healthier alternatives like atta instead of maida and olive oil instead of butter. And sometimes just give your kids a break, when they ask for a packet of chips or some silly over priced chocolate, just let them have it!

Sauce it up:
Stop trying to force feed icky green dry vegetables to your child! I'm sure you also couldn't have eaten something that bland, happily as a kid. It's unfair to ask your child to eat boiled broccoli and boring raw salads just to maintain that healthy balanced diet. Instead you could make all these vegetables yummy by adding different sauces and dressings to them. Load up any salad with some mayo dressing or thousand island or whatever you think your child might enjoy. If they're happy eating such yummy salads you probably won't worry about the calories in the sauces! serve beans, broccoli, cucumber and anything else you want them to eat in a creamy white sauce. That way they'll lick the bowl clean before you can even say green vegetables!

Serve dessert and food togteher:
Won't they just eat the dessert and skip dinner? if you give them just one serving of dessert long with dinner, they'll still be hungry after that small amount of dessert. So even if the attack the dessert first, odds are they'll still be hungry and will end up having their dinner too. The trick here is to give a small portion of dessert so they can't fill up on just dessert. You could serve items like fresh fruit, apple crumble, oatmeal cookies, frozen yogurt etc to keep the desserts on the healthier side.

Serve dinner for breakfast:
Whatever your child's favorite dinner dish is, try serving that for breakfast. If your child loves pizza, serve mini pizza's for breakfast. Just fill pita pockets with chicken, cheese, tomatoes and serve it up as a mini pizza. If your child loves egg then make an omelette with vegetables and some cut pieces of meat. You could even add some cheese to it! this might make them finish breakfast in no time.

Provide alternatives:
If you child wants chips, offer tortilla chips with salsa. If they ask for french fries, make those at home using less oil and salt. When he/she asks for pizza, try making them at home instead of ordering them from outside. Just by proving similar alternatives to food they crave you can improve their eating habits. Also when you're cooking at home, you can toss in a lot of vegetables without them finding out!

Try new recipes:
Not only kids, every person gets tired of eating the same thing over and over again. Try to find various recipes for one food item so that your child can keep eating the same vegetables without saying the food is boring. You'll find more than 5 ways to make healthy pasta and a zillion ways to make paneer ki sabzi. Actually this little trick might even spruce up your taste buds, not to mention cooking won't seem like such a tedious task once you get tasty food as the reward!

Don't try too hard:
The more you push, the more they'll push back. Using threats, bribes, punishments and anger isn't going to make them eat vegetables. Just sit back and let them eat their food without nagging in between. Eventually you'll notice the food that used to lie on the corner of the plate is now happily settled in their stomach. This way they'll learn to eat healthy on their own, especially in the long run. You won't have to call them during their college ad working years to ask did you eat your fruits and vegetables today? Phew, now won't that be a relief.

In case of any query or to book an appointment with dt. Silky mahajan please send us a mail at info@foodsandnutrition. In or call on 080 6741 7780 (dial extension: 778).

1 person found this helpful

My brother 3 year old kid sick with a temperature of 100 degrees what should I do?

DNB (Pediatrics), Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician, Bangalore
My brother 3 year old kid sick with a temperature of 100 degrees what should I do?
Give him paracetamol syrup for controlling fever and see a doctor if fever persists for more than a day.
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I have a fibroid in uterus. It is a hypoechoic mass of 38x40 mm in size. Any treatment of it except surgery.

B.H.M.S
Homeopath, Patna
Kali iod 30 take one drop 8 hourly in a glass of water for one month. Lachesi 1m one drop. Report in 5 days.
1 person found this helpful
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My Baby is 3 months ,he has some scar on his head and its itching. When it started it was very small now its spreading through out the head. He also develop some white patches on his chik, we are applying candid 1% ,but it seems growing any body having any suggestion.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
My Baby is 3 months ,he has some scar on his head and its itching. When it started it was very small now its spreadin...
These scars are scaling, oily yellowish. It may be cradle cap which usually lasts up to 6 months of age, requires no treatment except you may wash it with baby shampoo. Some suggest to remove it gently but I personally feel not to scrub it. Else consult either pediatrician or dermatologist.
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She is about 3 month. She pressurizes a lot while doing potty & takes around 20 minute. Is it ok or a problem. Cure?

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
How is the feeding > if bottle fed stop bottle and give only breast milk. Regarding this constipation you check her tsh and inform me personally.(to rule out hypothyroid state which can be seen in infants causing constipation.
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My baby boy is 2.5 months old and he is not crying loudly is there any problems in future related voice?

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
My baby boy is 2.5 months old and he is not crying loudly is there any problems in future related voice?
Child cries when he is in agony for any reason. if he is talking well and voice is clear, you need not to worry. Even then you may consult ENT specialist.
1 person found this helpful
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My baby is sneezing and got a running nose, she's 5 months old. What are the homemade precautions we'll take to avoid different types of medicine?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Delhi
My baby is sneezing and got a running nose, she's 5 months old. What are the homemade precautions we'll take to avoid...
Avoid him to be in direct contact wilth heater and acs, avoid dust, cover him with warm clothes specially head, hands and legs.
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Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Consultant Dyslexia, Autism & Child Psychologist. Consultant Clinical & Mental Health Psychologist., Post Masters Doc in Behavioural Medicine , Post Masters Doc Psychology
Psychologist, Noida
Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  1. Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten
  2. Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet
  3. Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make
  4. Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat
  5. Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'
  6. Has difficulty learning new words
  7. Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age
  8. Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences
  9. Has trouble rhyming

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School

  1. Struggles with reading and spelling
  2. Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'
  3. Has trouble remembering facts and numbers
  4. Has difficulty gripping a pencil
  5. Has difficulty using proper grammar
  6. Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization
  7. Gets tripped up by word problems in math
  8. Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words
  9. Has trouble following a sequence of directions

Warning Signs in High School

  1. Struggles with reading out loud
  2. Doesn't read at the expected grade level
  3. Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms
  4. Has difficulty organizing and managing time
  5. Struggles to summarize a story
  6. Has difficulty learning a foreign language

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:

General:

  1. Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.
  2. Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."
  3. Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.
  4. High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.
  5. Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.
  6. Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.
  7. Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.
  8. Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."
  9. Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  1. Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.
  2. Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.
  3. Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.
  4. Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.
  5. Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.
  6. Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  1. Spells phonetically and inconsistently.
  2. Hearing and Speech Skills
  3. Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.
  4. Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.

Writing and Motor Skills:

  1. Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.
  2. Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.
  3. Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.
  4. Math and Time Management Skills
  5. Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.
  6. Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.
  7. Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.
  8. Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.

Memory and Cognition:

  1. Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.
  2. Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.
  3. Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).
  4. Behavior, Health, Development and Personality
  5. Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.
  6. Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.
  7. Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).
  8. Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.
  9. Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.
  10. Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.
  11. Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  • Read out loud every day
  • Tap into your child's interests
  • Use audiobooks
  • Look for apps and other high-tech help
  • Focus on effort, not outcome
  • Make your home reader-friendly
  • Boost confidence

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  • Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.
  • Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.
  • Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a neurologist and ask a free question.

2609 people found this helpful

Hi doctors. My son is now 5 years old. And he is suffering from skin problem from the age of his 10months. Ulcer type occers on his skin and he itched it. And blood comesout from there (mostly at legs and hands. Doctors says its a tropical ezeima. Please do help.

Pediatrician, Pune
Clinical photograph will help, in view of the diagnosis provided, topical steroids may be required, the skin can be kept moist, after taking a bath in the morning do not wipe the skin, apply blan oil, cream over the wet skin, plenty of hydration will reduce the itching.
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My sister is 16 years age with 5feet height but she has 65 kg weight. She is too much worried about her increasing weight.

MSc
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Chandigarh
My sister is 16 years age with 5feet height but she has 65 kg weight. She is too much worried about her increasing we...
Hi firstly, start doing surya namaskar in morning and start eating triphla chooran (natural medicine) in morning empty stomach with luke warm water. Start a fruit dieting every alternative day, means you have to eat fruits every alternative days & normal fruit every other alternative days. Avoid late night dinners and try to eat nothing after sunset. Sit in vajrasana after every meal you eat for 10 minutes. Walk atleast 30 min in morning.
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Hello, my aunt had a delivery last month. She didn't have enough milk to feed her baby. What should be given to a one month baby if mother's milk is not enough?

FELLOWSHIP IN PCCM, FELLOW-PEDIATRIC FLEXIBLE BRONCHOSCOPY, FELLOWSHIP IN PEDIATRIC CARDIAC CRITICAL CARE, D.C.H., M.B.B.S
Pediatrician, Ahmedabad
Hello, my aunt had a delivery last month. She didn't have enough milk to feed her baby. What should be given to a one...
Many formula feeds are available out of which nan pro 1 and similac stage 1. These two are good formula feeds available in india. Disclaimer: mom s milk is the best for newly born till 6 months.
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My 2 months baby is not taking her mother milk, please guide how can we give her that?

DMB
Pediatrician, Chennai
My 2 months baby is not taking her mother milk, please guide how can we give her that?
Not taking mothers milk means the baby is getting other milk. You have to express the milk and give it with the help of sterile spoon. Do this every 2 hrs. Once the baby like the taste of your milk, he or she will go back to sucking at the nipple which will I turn increase milk secretion.
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C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Common Conditions in Newborns


Some physical conditions are especially common during the first couple of weeks after birth. If you notice any of the following in your baby, contact your pediatrician ONLINE lybrate.com/drsajeev

Possetting. ( Vomiting as mothers complain )

Most mothers complain that their babies " vomit " all the feed after feeding. It is in all normal conditions, just possetting ( belching out / regurgitating ) milk due to lack of tone/development of GE sphincter at the junction of esophagus and stomach. It will gain strength and this belching out mlk will stop by 6- 12 months (varies in each child) . All you need to do is just burp the baby by putting him/her on shoulders or laying upside down on your lap/thigh and gently stroke at the back.

Excessive Crying
All newborns cry, often for no apparent reason. If you’ve made sure that your baby is fed, burped, warm, and dressed in a clean diaper, the best tactic is probably to hold him and talk or sing to him until he stops. You cannot “spoil” a baby this age by giving him too much attention. If this doesn’t work, wrap him snugly in a blanket.
You’ll become accustomed to your baby’s normal pattern of crying. If it ever sounds peculiar—for example, like shrieks of pain—or if it persists for an unusual length of time, it could mean a medical problem. Call the pediatrician and ask for advice.


Coughing
If the baby drinks very fast or tries to drink water for the first time, he may cough and sputter a bit; but this type of coughing should stop as soon as he adjusts to a familiar feeding routine. This may also be related to how strong or fast a breastfeeding mom’s milk comes down. If he coughs persistently or routinely gags during feedings, consult the pediatrician. These symptoms could indicate an underlying problem in the lungs or digestive tract.


Lethargy and Sleepiness
Every newborn spends most of his time sleeping. As long as he wakes up every few hours, eats well, seems content, and is alert part of the day, it’s perfectly normal for him to sleep the rest of the time. But if he’s rarely alert, does not wake up on his own for feedings, or seems too tired or uninterested to eat, you should consult your pediatrician. This lethargy—especially if it’s a sudden change in his usual pattern—may be a symptom of a serious illness.

Jaundice
Many normal, healthy newborns have a yellowish tinge to their skin, which is known as jaundice. It is caused by a buildup of a chemical called bilirubin in the child’s blood. This occurs most often when the immature liver has not yet begun to efficiently do its job of removing bilirubin from the bloodstream (bilirubin is formed from the body’s normal breakdown of red blood cells). While babies often have a mild case of jaundice, which is harmless, it can become a serious condition when bilirubin reaches what the pediatrician considers to be a very high level. Although jaundice is quite treatable, if the bilirubin level is very high and is not treated effectively, it can even lead to nervous system or brain damage in some cases, which is why the condition must be checked for and appropriately treated. Jaundice tends to be more common in newborns who are breastfeeding, most often in those who are not nursing well; breastfeeding mothers should nurse at least eight to twelve times per day, which will help produce enough milk and help keep bilirubin levels low.

Jaundice appears first on the face, then on the chest and abdomen, and finally on the arms and legs in some instances. The whites of the eyes may also be yellow. The pediatrician will examine the baby for jaundice, and if she suspects that it may be present—based not only on the amount of yellow in the skin, but also on the baby’s age and other factors—she may order a skin or blood test to definitively diagnose the condition. If jaundice develops before the baby is twenty-four hours old, a bilirubin test is always needed to make an accurate diagnosis. At three to five days old, newborns should be checked by a doctor or nurse, since this is the time when the bilirubin level is highest; for that reason, if an infant is discharged before he is seventy-two hours old, he should be seen by the pediatrician within two days of that discharge. Some newborns need to be seen even sooner, including:

Those with a high bilirubin level before leaving the hospital
Those born early (more than two weeks before the due date)
Those whose jaundice is present in the first twenty-four hours after birth
Those who are not breastfeeding well
Those with considerable bruising and bleeding under the scalp, associated with labor and delivery
Those who have a parent or sibling who had high bilirubin levels and underwent treatment for it
When the doctor determines that jaundice is present and needs to be treated, the bilirubin level can be reduced by placing the infant under special lights when he is undressed—either in the hospital or at home. His eyes will be covered to protect them during the light therapy. This kind of treatment can prevent the harmful effects of jaundice. In infants who are breastfed, jaundice may last for more than two to three weeks; in those who are formula-fed, most cases of jaundice go away by two weeks of age.



Abdominal Distension
Most babies’ bellies normally stick out, especially after a large feeding. Between feedings, however, they should feel quite soft. Similarly in children upto 3-4 years, the abdomen is a little protuberant due to lack of muscle tone. This is normal and and will go away once the child grows and abdomen tones up. If your child’s abdomen feels swollen and hard, and if he has not had a bowel movement for more than one or two days or is vomiting, call your pediatrician. Most likely the problem is due to gas or constipation, but it also could signal a more serious intestinal problem.

Birth Injuries
It is possible for babies to be injured during birth, especially if labor is particularly long or difficult, or when babies are very large. While newborns recover quickly from some of these injuries, others persist longer term. Quite often the injury is a broken collarbone, which will heal quickly if the arm on that side is kept relatively motionless. Incidentally, after a few weeks a small lump may form at the site of the fracture, but don’t be alarmed; this is a positive sign that new bone is forming to mend the injury.

Muscle weakness is another common birth injury, caused during labor by pressure or stretching of the nerves attached to the muscles. These muscles, usually weakened on one side of the face or one shoulder or arm, generally return to normal after several weeks. In the meantime, ask your pediatrician to show you how to nurse and hold the baby to promote healing.

Blue Baby
Babies may have mildly blue hands and feet, but this may not be a cause for concern. If their hands and feet turn a bit blue from cold, they should return to pink as soon as they are warm. Occasionally, the face, tongue, and lips may turn a little blue when the newborn is crying hard, but once he becomes calm, his color in these parts of the body should quickly return to normal. However, persistently blue skin coloring, especially with breathing difficulties and feeding difficulties, is a sign that the heart or lungs are not operating properly, and the baby is not getting enough oxygen in the blood. Immediate medical attention is essential.

Forceps Marks
When forceps are used to help during a delivery, they can leave red marks or even superficial scrapes on a newborn’s face and head where the metal pressed against the skin. These generally disappear within a few days. Sometimes a firm, flat lump develops in one of these areas because of minor damage to the tissue under the skin, but this, too, usually will go away within two months.



Respiratory Distress
It may take your baby a few hours after birth to form a normal pattern of breathing, but then he should have no further difficulties. If he seems to be breathing in an unusual manner, it is most often from blockage of the nasal passages. The use of saline nasal drops, followed by the use of a bulb syringe, are what may be needed to fix the problem; both are available over the counter at all pharmacies.

However, if your newborn shows any of the following warning signs, notify your pediatrician immediately: YOu CAN CONSULT ONLINE PRIVATELY :-LYBRATE.COM/drsajeev

Fast breathing (more than sixty breaths in one minute), although keep in mind that babies normally breathe more rapidly than adults.
Retractions (sucking in the muscles between the ribs with each breath, so that her ribs stick out)
Flaring of her nose
Grunting while breathing
Persistent blue skin coloring
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