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Dr. Sourav Patwa

MBBS

Pediatrician, Mumbai

500 at clinic
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Dr. Sourav Patwa MBBS Pediatrician, Mumbai
500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. Sourav Patwa
Dr. Sourav Patwa is a renowned Pediatrician in Malad West, Mumbai. He has completed MBBS . You can consult Dr. Sourav Patwa at Saraswati Hospital in Malad West, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Sourav Patwa on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MBBS - - -

Location

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Saraswati Hospital

Divya Smruti, Link Road, Malad West. Landmark: Opposite Toyota Showroom, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Saraswati Hospital

Divya Smruti, 1st Floor, Opp Toyota Showroom,New Link Rd Malad, Malad West,Landmark: Near Ichapurti Hanuman Temple.Mumbai Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Meri age 26 hai. Meri 10 month ki beti hai. Me use abhi bhi breast feeding karti hu. Meri breast size 36 hai abhi aur mera weight 56 hai aur height 5 feet 6 inch hai. Toh me jab breast feeding band kar dungi toh meri breast size kam ho jayegi na? Aur breastfeeding ke bad weight gain hota hai kya?

MBBS, DGO - Preventive & Social Medicine
Gynaecologist, Sri Ganganagar
Yes if you do chest exercises to reduce breast size .Do not eat junk food and oily food eat nutritious diet you will never gain weight.
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RTS, S/AS01 I had heard a malaria vaccine has been developed the last year. Can we get it in India for our babies.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
RTS, S/AS01 I had heard a malaria vaccine has been developed the last year. Can we get it in India for our babies.
As far as I know, it is under process and has not come in use. I shall be happy to know the source of your information.
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I am 15 years old. What is the best physical exercise or yoga is best for me. and how to do them? Not food habits pls?

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
I am 15 years old. What is the best physical exercise or yoga is best for me. and how to do them? Not food habits pls?
Regular poster active work is all that required. Yoga and gym is for those who always sit on chair and use brain for 10-14 hrs a day. Food should be normal cereals based, home cooked fast food as regular habbit is again bed idea.
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My baby growth not improvment. Please suggest me kya du me jise baby ki health achi ho.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
My baby growth not improvment. Please suggest me kya du me jise baby ki health achi ho.
Few diet tips - Not to eat fried food items and Can eat All green vegetables, moong , chana , Dal , rice etc And to apply ghee over chappati and don’t apply oil over chappati And to drink milk mixed with turmeric powder twice a day And If possible eat eggs on alternate days And If possible in breakfast eat atleast one bajra ka rotla And Eat seasonal fruit
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My son is one and half year old and I am thinking to give him a egg along with milk in his diet, is it safe?

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Masters in FPNS
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Dehradun
My son is one and half year old and I am thinking to give him a egg along with milk in his diet, is it safe?
No need to give this at this age. Let him grow 3-4 years at least .as he need to grow his digestive system to digest this mixture. You can give this separately. But often not regularly.
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Is it ok to make my 13 months old son drink farm milk. Till today we used dexolac formula. Give suggestion.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Namakkal
Is it ok to make my 13 months old son drink farm milk. Till today we used dexolac formula. Give suggestion.
just proceed with home made food with egg and non vegetarian.. liquid energetic diet will suppress appetite
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My son is 14 years old (15-01-2002. In October he took cricket coaching for 10 days. Since then he fell ill frequently. Sometimes headaches, sometimes fever. He feel weakness all the time. Dr. Please suggest me diet or supplement for him. His height 5'10. Weight 60 kg.

MD - Paediatrics
Pediatrician, Allahabad
Problem of your child doesn't appear related to cricket coaching. In view of fever, headache & generalized weakness, a thorough evaluation is warranted. Pl consult your pediatrician at earliest.
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My daughter is in 6th std she has lots of lices and nits in her hair pls give me some solution for this ?

Pediatrician, Pune
can apply 15ml gammascab lotion mixed with shampoo thrice in a week over her hair , the same should be done for other family members if they are having the same , screen some of her close friends in the school who might be having similar problem
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Take Care of Your Child's Diet

MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

Making appropriate food choices for your baby during the first year of life is very important. More growth occurs during the first year than at any other time in your child's life. It's important to feed your baby a variety of healthy foods at the proper time. Starting good eating habits at this early stage will help set healthy eating patterns for life.

Recommended feeding guide for the first year

Don't give solid foods unless your child's health care provider advises you to do so. Solid foods should not be started before age 4 months because:

  • Breast milk or formula provides your baby all the nutrients that are needed for growth.
  • Your baby isn't physically developed enough to eat solid food from a spoon.
  • Feeding your baby solid food too early may lead to overfeeding and being overweight.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all infants, children, and adolescents take in enough vitamin D through supplements, formula, or cow's milk to prevent complications from deficiency of this vitamin. In November 2008, the AAP updated its recommendations for daily intake of vitamin D for healthy infants, children, and adolescents. It is now recommended that the minimum intake of vitamin D for these groups should be 400 IU per day, beginning soon after birth. Your baby's health care provider can recommend the proper type and amount of vitamin D supplement for your baby.

Guide for formula feeding (0 to 5 months)

Age

Amount of formula per feeding

Number of feedings per 24 hours

1 month

2 to 4 ounces

6 to 8 times

2 months

5 to 6 ounces

5 to 6 times

3 to 5 months

6 to 7 ounces

5 to 6 times

Feeding tips for your child

These are some things to consider when feeding your baby:

  • When starting solid foods, give your baby one new food at a time — not mixtures (like cereal and fruit or meat dinners). Give the new food for 3 to 5 days before adding another new food. This way you can tell what foods your baby may be allergic to or can't tolerate.
  • Begin with small amounts of new solid foods — a teaspoon at first and slowly increase to a tablespoon.
  • Begin with dry infant rice cereal first, mixed as directed, followed by vegetables, fruits, and then meats.
  • Don't use salt or sugar when making homemade infant foods. Canned foods may contain large amounts of salt and sugar and shouldn't be used for baby food. Always wash and peel fruits and vegetables and remove seeds or pits. Take special care with fruits and vegetables that come into contact with the ground. They may contain botulism spores that cause food poisoning.
  • Infant cereals with iron should be given to your infant until your infant is age 18 months.
  • Cow's milk shouldn't be added to the diet until your infant is age 1. Cow's milk doesn't provide the proper nutrients for your baby.
  • The AAP recommends not giving fruit juices to infants younger than age 6 months. Only pasteurized, 100% fruit juices (without added sugar) may be given to older infants and children, and should be limited to 4 ounces a day. Dilute the juice with water and offer it in a cup with a meal.
  • Feed all food with a spoon. Your baby needs to learn to eat from a spoon. Don't use an infant feeder. Only formula and water should go into the bottle.
  • Avoid honey in any form for your child's first year, as it can cause infant botulism.
  • Don't put your baby in bed with a bottle propped in his or her mouth. Propping a bottle has been linked to an increased risk of ear infections. Once your baby's teeth are present, propping the bottle can also cause tooth decay. There is also a risk of choking.
  • Help your baby to give up the bottle by his or her first birthday.
  • Avoid the "clean plate syndrome." Forcing your child to eat all the food on his or her plate even when he or she isn't hungry isn't a good habit. It teaches your child to eat just because the food is there, not because he or she is hungry. Expect a smaller and pickier appetite as the baby's growth rate slows around age 1.
  • Infants and young children shouldn't eat hot dogs, nuts, seeds, round candies, popcorn, hard, raw fruits and vegetables, grapes, or peanut butter. These foods aren't safe and may cause your child to choke. Many health care providers suggest these foods be saved until after your child is age 3 or 4. Always watch a young child while he or she is eating. Insist that the child sit down to eat or drink.
  • Healthy infants usually require little or no extra water, except in very hot weather. When solid food is first fed to your baby, extra water is often needed.
  • Don't limit your baby's food choices to the ones you like. Offering a wide variety of foods early will pave the way for good eating habits later.
  • Fat and cholesterol shouldn't be restricted in the diets of very young children, unless advised by your child's health care provider. Children need calories, fat, and cholesterol for the development of their brains and nervous systems, and for general growth.

Feeding guide for the first year (4 to 8 months)

Item

4 to 6 months

7 months

8 months

Breastfeeding or formula

4 to 6 feedings per day or 28 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

3 to 5 tbs. single grain iron fortified cereal mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. single grain cereal mixed with formula

Fruits

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

Vegetables

1 to 2 tbs., plain, strained/1 to 2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., plain, strained/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., strained, mashed, soft/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

 

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

1 to 2 tbs., strained/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

 

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Snacks

 

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers

Arrowroot cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt

Development

Make first cereal feedings very soupy and thicken slowly.

Start finger foods and cup.

Formula intake decreases; solid foods in diet increase.

Feeding guide for the first year (9 to 12 months)

Item

9 months

10 to 12 months

Breastfeeding or formula

3 to 5 feedings per day or 30 to 32 ounces per day

3 to 4 feedings per day or 24 to 30 ounces per day

Dry infant cereal with iron

5 to 8tbs. any variety mixed with formula

5 to 8 tbs. any variety mixed with formula per day

Fruits

2 to 4 tbs., strained or soft mashed/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed or strained, cooked/2 times per day

Vegetables

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

2 to 4 tbs., mashed, soft, bite-sized pieces/2 times per day

Meats and protein foods

2 to 3 tbs. of tender, chopped/2 times per day

2 to 3 tbs., finely chopped, table meats, fish without bones, mild cheese/2 times per day

Juices, vitamin C fortified

4 oz. from a cup

4 oz. from a cup

Starches

 

1/4-1/2 cup mashed potatoes, macaroni, spaghetti, bread/2 times per day

Snacks

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans

Arrowroot cookies, assorted finger foods, cookies, toast, crackers, plain yogurt, cooked green beans, cottage cheese, ice cream, pudding, dry cereal

Development

Eating more table foods. Make sure diet has good variety.

Baby may change to table food. Baby will feed himself or herself and use a spoon and cup.

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