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Dr. Snigdha Mehtha

Neurologist, Mumbai

2000 at clinic
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Dr. Snigdha Mehtha Neurologist, Mumbai
2000 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Snigdha Mehtha
Dr. Snigdha Mehtha is a popular Neurologist in Vile Parle, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Snigdha Mehtha personally at Bindusar Clinic in Vile Parle, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Snigdha Mehtha and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Neurologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Neurologists with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English
Hindi

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Bindusar Clinic

Bindusar, Juhu Vile Parle Scheme(Jvp Scheme), Near Jamanabai School,Landmark:Jamunabhai Highshool. North South Road No 8, Juhu, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
2000 at clinic
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Hi - My father had a paralysis stroke about six months back, not completely recovered on the impacted left side. Major concern currently - loss of appetite, loss of weight, completely weak, likes to always be on bed and sleep, his daily and night schedules are out of track sometimes Appreciate any help and suggestion on improving above conditions current medication - clopitab, nurospur, eritel, tonact Thanks in advance

Master in Physiotherapy (MPT), Bachelor of Physiotherapy (BPT), CMT-Diploma in Osteopathy
Physiotherapist, Gurgaon
Patient after stroke got depressed thats why they got bed ridden. Try to make them happy and try to involve them in activity of daily living. Try to make them use the effected limbs. Go for ndt approach, it will definitely help.
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I am 67 and having hand shaking especially taking coffee cup and cheque signing. Taking tablets Pronate Tr 40, Pacitane, some month Parkitidin 100mg. Any better medicine?

MD - Alternate Medicine, BHMS
Homeopath, Surat
This is parkinson's disease. This disease has no ultimate cure, it can just be managed. For that I have a medicine which I got from uk, giving good results.
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My dad is 62 years old. He is suffering from burning sensation on the feet and throat since last year. We have consulted lots of doctors and completed several tests as well. Except vitamin b12 all other reports were normal. Doctor says its neuropathy and has prescribed medicines for the same but still the problems persist.

MD - Alternate Medicine, PGDIP.IN Geriatric Care, Post Graduate Diploma In Holistic Healthcare
Ayurveda, Balasore
My dad is 62 years old. He is suffering from burning sensation on the feet and throat since last year. We have consul...
Dear lybrate-user, burning sensation of feet and throat might be due to increase in acidic balance of blood. So have alkalik therapy like alkasol, uflow syrup and some antacid. Have leg bath with saline water 10 minutes deeping into a bowel. Vit b12 is not factor also vit-c required to cease burning. Try to take take multivitamin with vit. C. Ok.
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Nerves weakness is my problem. I often getting this more When I swim. Even if I eat badam daily, this is happening. Why?

MBBS, MD (Medicine), DM (Neurology)
Neurologist, Mumbai
Nerves weakness is my problem. I often getting this more When I swim. Even if I eat badam daily, this is happening. Why?
It is not clear what you mean by" nerves weakness" you may first consult a psychiatrist after checking your blood sugar levels (fasting/post-prandial) are normal. I do not appreciate you have a primary neurological problem.
2 people found this helpful
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My friend had a problem on friday. He fell down on bed unconscious with his eyes wide opened. And it remained for 3-4 minutes. He was not in his senses and became normal in 15 minutes. Want to know what can be the cause of this. Around a year back also he fainted in washroom.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
It could be vasovagal attack. He needs to stay hydrated. Also get his aarogyam 1.7 and EEG done and revert so that I may assist you further.
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Can cerebral palsy be cured by surgery? Age 25 years and the disease continue from childhood?

MS - General Surgery, Mch Neurosurgery
Neurosurgeon, Guwahati
Can cerebral palsy be cured by surgery? Age 25 years and the disease continue from childhood?
For cerebral palsy no Surgical treatment as such. Sometimes surgeries are done for intractable seizure in cases of cerebral palsy.
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I'm 67 yrs. Old. I'm suffering from migraine. Whenever it starts I take 1/2 migranil tablet. What is the precaution to avoid it?

Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicines and Surgery(BAMS), Post Graduation Diploma in Emergency Medicines And Services(PGDEMS), MD - Alternate Medicine
Ayurveda, Ghaziabad
Hi Take ½ glass of carrot juice + Add ½ glass of spinach juice + Mix well + Drink this juice to cure headache 1-1 drop of cow ghee in both nostrils at night time before sleep. Take pranacharya no tens capsule 1_1 twice a day. Take shirshooladi vajra ras twice a day with honey. Avoid tea and coffee.
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I am 32 years and having migraine headache from last 8 years. I have tried all sort of medicine but no relief. Please advise some.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hello, Self-care measures can help ease the pain of a migraine headache. Try muscle relaxation exercises. Relaxation techniques may include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation or yoga. Get enough sleep, but don't oversleep. Get an adequate amount of sleep each night. It's best to go to bed and wake up at regular times, as well. If possible, rest in a dark, quiet room when you feel a headache coming on. Place an ice pack wrapped in a cloth on the back of your neck and apply gentle pressure to painful areas on your scalp. Medication: Take Bakson's Mig Aid tablet/ 1 tablet 3 times a day.
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Brain Stroke - Who Can Possibly Suffer From It?

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Neurology
Neurologist, Gurgaon
Brain Stroke - Who Can Possibly Suffer From It?

A brain stroke can affect anyone at any point of time when the supply of blood to the brain is interrupted. It can threaten major physical functions and can prove to be fatally dangerous at times. The brain stem which is placed right above the spinal cord controls the breathing, heartbeat and levels of blood pressure. It is also in charge of controlling some elementary functions such as swallowing, hearing, speech and eye movements.

What are the different types of strokes?
There are three main kinds of stroke: ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes and transient ischemic attacks. The most common type of brain stroke is the ischemic stroke is caused by narrowing or blocking of arteries to the brain, which prevents the proper supply of blood to the brain. Sometimes it so happens that the blood clot that has formed elsewhere in the body have travelled via the blood vessels and has been trapped in the blood vessel which provides blood to the brain. When the supply of blood to a part of the brain is hindered, the tissue in that area dies off owing to lack of oxygen. The other variant of brain stroke is termed as hemorrhagic stroke is caused when the blood vessels in and around the brain burst or leak. Strokes need to be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible in order to minimize brain damage.  Remembering the F.A.S.T. acronym can help with recognizing the onset of stroke (Face, Arms, Speed, Time - explained below). 

What are the common symptoms of a brain stroke?
The symptoms of the brain stroke are largely dependent on the area of the brain that has been affected. It can interfere with normal functioning, such as breathing and talking and other functions which human beings can perform without thinking such as eye movements or swallowing. Since all the signals from the brain as well as other parts of the body traverse through the brain stem, the interruption of blood flow often leads to numbness or paralysis in different parts of the body.

Who is likely to have a stroke?
Anyone is at a risk of developing brain stroke although ageing is directly proportional to the risk of having a stroke. Not only that an individual with a family history of brain stroke or transient ischemic attack is at a higher risk of developing stroke. People who have aged over 65 accounts for about 33 percent of all brain strokes. It is important to point here that individuals with high blood pressure, high blood sugar, cholesterol, cancer, autoimmune diseases and some blood disorders are at a higher risk of developing brain stroke.

There are a few factors which can increase the risk of developing stroke beyond any control. But there are certain lifestyle choices as well which aids in controlling the chances of being affected by stroke. It is crucial to refrain from long-term hormone replacement therapies as well as birth control pills, smoking, lack of physical activity, excessive use of alcohol and drug addiction. A brain stroke is a life-threatening medical condition, and when an individual has symptoms that resemble that of stroke, it is crucial to seek immediate medical help.

Treatment for stroke

  1. Treatment depends on the type of stroke.
  2. Ischemic strokes can be treated with 'clot-busting' drugs.
  3. Hemorrhagic strokes can be treated with surgery to repair or block blood vessel weaknesses.
  4. The most effective way to prevent strokes is through maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

What is TPA?
TPA is a thrombolytic or a “Clot Buster” drug. This clot buster is used to break-up the clot that is causing a blockage or disruption in the flow of blood to the brain and helps restore the blood flow to the area of the brain. It is given by intravenous (IV). This can be given only within 4.5 hrs of the onset of symptoms

Time is brain

  1. Remember Every second Loss means brain cells die.
  2. Rush to the nearest Stroke Centre whenever you experience such symptoms.
  3. U can save the brain cells dying if you reach within 4.5 hrs by the CLOT BUSTER. 

Endovascular procedures 
Another treatment option is an endovascular procedure* called mechanical thrombectomy, strongly recommended, in which  trained doctors try  removing a large blood clot by  sending a wired-caged device called a stent retriever, to the site of the blocked blood vessel in the brain

Stroke prevention
The good news is that 80 percent of all strokes are preventable. It starts with managing key risk factors, including 

  1. High blood pressure,
  2. Cigarette smoking,
  3. Diabetes
  4. Atrial fibrillation and
  5. Physical inactivity.
  6. More than half of all strokes are caused by uncontrolled hypertension or high blood pressure, making it the most important risk factor to control. 

Rehabilitation
The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation ("rehab"). In stroke rehab, a team of health professionals works with you to regain skills you lost as the result of a stroke. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3139 people found this helpful

Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

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