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Dr. Smitha

Veterinarian, Mumbai

500 at clinic
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Dr. Smitha Veterinarian, Mumbai
500 at clinic
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Smitha
Dr. Smitha is one of the best Veterinarians in Khar West, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Smitha personally at Happy Tails Clinic in Khar West, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Smitha and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Happy Tails Clinic

Brand Of U V Enterprises, Mangal Smruti, Plot 414-14 Road, Khar West, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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I have a pet dog of 1 year 4months age. There are few blister type formation just near his mouth. Sometimes blood comes out from it. Any idea what is it?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Its because of oral ulcer may be due to vitamin c defeciency please have him with fish oil and vitamins tablets.
9 people found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

Why do Puppies Need Deworming?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whip-worms are common among young puppies and kittens. All puppies should be given a dewormer for easily-prevented illness caused by these parasites. Read more about how to prevent parasites in your dog or cat

Common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

You've probably heard the names before

1. Roundworms, 2. Hookworms, 3. Whip-worms and 4. Tapeworms. These are the intestinal parasites most often seen in pets, and each of them can harm your dog or cat in unique ways.

Symptoms of intestinal parasites in pets
While worms are usually found in puppies and kittens, infection can occur in dogs and cats of all ages. Signs of an intestinal parasite infection can include:
Diarrhoea
Vomiting
Weight loss
Swollen stomach
Anemia
Death (in severe infestations)

Note that these signs can also be associated with other diseases so if you observe any of them, you should take your pet in to see your veterinarian for an examination. Diagnosing an intestinal parasite infection is usually done through a laboratory analysis of your pet’s faeces.
De-worming has become a controversial subject.
Developing de-worming strategies requires consideration of a several different things, including:
• What parasites are in the area?
• Are the risks the same all year round or are they seasonal?
• What parasites pose a risk to an individual pet or what are the pet’s chances of exposure? (e.g. Does the pet go outside? Is it exposed to many other animals? Are there multiple pets in the household?)
• Are there any people in the household at particular risk for parasitic infections? (e.g. young children, people with developmental disorders that might be more likely to be exposed to pet faeces?)
Everyone agrees puppies and kittens need more aggressive de-worming, but there are a few different approaches to managing de-worming in adult animals.
So as far as myself consider regular de-worming in these schedules:
STAGE ONE
Puppy de-worming: (age 40 days – 120 days) preferably suspension
(I don’t recommend de-worming puppies before 30 days as it may affect their nutritional absorption mechanism and reduce the immunity level, while they are feeding with the dam I think they are well protected. )
1. Puppy at the age of 40-60 days while doing the primary vaccine
2. Next second dose at the booster stage around 15 days from the first dose i.e. around 55 days – 75 days.
3. Third dose is at 90-120 days
STAGE TWO
Puppies at 120-180 Days of age: preferably tablet
De-worming around 180 days is preferable and do consult with your vets for specific drug of choice depending up on breed and their nature of infection they have
STAGE THREE:
Semi adult dogs 180 – 360 days: preferably tablets
In this period you can de-worm the puppy either once in 2 months if you have a group or pack of dogs or you can once in three months if you have just one dog with you
STAGE FOUR:
Adult dogs anything above 360 days
Once in every 3 months i.e.. yearly four times is the recommended Schedule for Asia
BITCH IN HEAT: special condition
Should be de-wormed at 4- 5 th day of heat and repeat dosage at 9-10th day second dose and third and final dose is after whelping and after the milking period stops i.e. after whelping 60 days apart best way to maintain the breeding bitch as per standards
Choosing the right dewormer for your dog
There are many different types and brands of de-wormers on the MARKET: and determining which dewormer to use, whether to administer it by pill or liquid, and at what dose can depend on a lot of factors.
Knowing which dewormer to use and at what dose can depend on a variety of things such as the type of intestinal parasite present, and the age, size and current health of your pet. Aside from reading the labels on de-worming products, it’s important to discuss the options and your dog’s unique needs with your veterinarian first.
Your veterinarian can recommend a product that’s appropriate for your pet after a diagnosis has been made of the type and species of the parasite. In addition, some medications can also be used to help control intestinal parasites. Considering that some parasites can infect people as well as pets, certain de-wormers may be used as a preventive measure to decrease the risk to humans.
4 people found this helpful

What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Ballia
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

I found a injured pigeon I bring it to home he is nt eating anything only drinking water and milk I think he got a electric shock.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You continue giving water and milk. For external injury you can get him check with local vet. You can use enrox for prevention of infection
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Ultrasonic anti rodent/rats machine, is it harmful for human ears or small below one month puppy ears, grateful if you can enlighten.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Frequency of the sound is too high for human to hear, but it is better you should consult with ent specialist.
10 people found this helpful
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My pug is not behaving well and also not eating as she eats normally, it happens from last 2 weeks when she started suffering from her periods, what can I do for her any ideas? Please let me know if you guys have any suggestions.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
In come cases, female dogs normally doesn't feel active & don't have the urge to eat during periods. It will become normal after few days after the periods are over.
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Obesity In Cats - What Should You Do?

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Obesity In Cats - What Should You Do?

If your cat is becoming overweight, it is definitely a reason for concern as it could be a sign of different disorders. Overweight and obese cats are growing in number and as a result, the number of cats under normal weight is significantly low. Obesity in cats can be a premonition of high blood sugar, arthritis and hepatic Lipidosis. But if you are willing to put your cat on a diet, then it must be pursued very carefully so that it doesn’t lead to undesirable results.

In a study conducted in 2011 by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, it was found that more than 50 percent of cats were overweight and obese. It is important to consider the reason behind sedentary obesity and the most obvious factor that comes to the fore is that any mammal that consumes more calories than it can burn. Any cat that has become overweight or obese should be put under comprehensive health checkup with blood and urine tests and exact weight measurement.

It is also important to check the hormone levels and to ensure that the cat has no metabolic or physical dysfunction. In case the cat is under normal physical function other than being overweight or obese, then a gradual weight loss diet can be implemented to achieve desired results.

Getting started:
The most crucial responsibility of the cat owner is to limit the calories that the feline consume on a regular basis. The general rule is that if the cat is 10 pounds, it must consume around 200 calories in a day according to the guidelines of the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. Here are some of the tips that you can follow in general to help your cat lose weight.

Measure the daily intake of food and divide the targeted amount of calorie into 4 to 6 small meals. Supply your cat with ample amount of water and consult with your veterinarian to set a weight loss goal. When the cat is becoming too fat, you should avoid giving treats and foods for human beings as that can cause obesity and diarrhea. Also, you should never allow your cat to eat dog food.Cats have their own cat foods commercially available. Every cat must consume those in order to maintain a standard body weight & stunning health. These foods are fortified with essential fibres,proteins or amino acids, micronutrients, vitamins and a very low quantity of carbohydrate. One should not feed any carbohydrate or starch like rice or bread to cats as this is practically not required. A too low amount of carbohydrate in daily diet of a cat is enough. Extra carbohydrate or carbohydrate mainly diet chiefly is responsible for sedentary life and extra pounds in body of the cats which make them prone to many lifestyle diseases like diabetes melitus etc.

Bottom line:
Veterinarians suggest that any new diet is required to be implemented slowly as there is high chance that your cat would stop eating altogether if you give her new foods all of a sudden. And the bottom line is, if you want your cat to control its weight through diet, then you must cut off calories in proportion to the level of physical activity that the cat indulges in. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, losing 1 pound in a month is a healthy option.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3463 people found this helpful

I have an 8 months old persian cat, but his hair is falling, so I requested give me a medicine which I give to my cat for perfect health

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should deworm her. If hair fall continue then get it check with vet. Hair fall is symptom of lot of skin problem in cats
1 person found this helpful
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Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he tried and failed I took him to vet doc, But my rabbit died in Vet Clinic before Checking He Tried to stand too hard and Breathing by month but He couldn't stand for a minute and in two hours he died Please I want to know Why he died?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he t...
The best way to know the reason in such cases to request vet to conduct posts mortum. As such symptoms can arise in multiple situation i. E. By making out which organs are affect vet can have rough idea about cause of death.
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