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Dr. Sanjay Patil  - Gynaecologist, Mumbai

Dr. Sanjay Patil

MBBS, MD (Obst. & Gynaecology)

Gynaecologist, Mumbai

36 Years Experience  ·  300 - 500 at clinic
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Dr. Sanjay Patil MBBS, MD (Obst. & Gynaecology) Gynaecologist, Mumbai
36 Years Experience  ·  300 - 500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Sanjay Patil
Dr. Sanjay Patil is a renowned Gynaecologist in Ghatkopar East, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Sanjay Patil personally at Parakh Hospital in Ghatkopar East, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Sanjay Patil on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Gynaecologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Gynaecologists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MBBS - Seth G.S. Medical College - 1982
MD (Obst. & Gynaecology) - Seth G. S. Medical college - 1986
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Molecular Pathology Association of India

Location

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Parakh Hospital

Khokhani Lane,Landmark: Opp. Ghatkopar Railway Station,Ghatkopar East, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
300 at clinic
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Apex Hospital - Dombivli East

Jankee Smriti Building 1st Floor, Gupte Road, Dombivli East. Landmark: Opposite Shiv Sena Association, ThaneMumbai Get Directions
500 at clinic
...more
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When is the best time to do the s** in a month?(my gf period will start at 1st of month) that I don't want to use con***

BAMS
Ayurveda, Ambala
When is the best time to do the s** in a month?(my gf period will start at 1st of month) that I don't want to use con***
For protection, you have to do sexual intercourse of safe days which are just after the periods & just before the peroids. At these days, the chances of pregnancy is very less.
1 person found this helpful
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Related to sex .Sex krne ke liye jo foreplay ke liye kaha jata hai wo hota kya hai .kaise krte hai? Yeah sab yaha puch raha hu kyu ki mujhe jaida pta nii hai inn baato kaa aur kahi aur puchne me sharam aati hai .isliye sab detail me btaiye please tell?

M.D
General Physician, Dhenkanal
Sex se pahele partner ko jagane ke liye kam ko foreplay bolte. Like kiss karna, gudgudi karna, breast ko massage, suck karna etc.
2 people found this helpful
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5 Signs That You Might Be Miscarrying

FIMS, DGO, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
5 Signs That You Might Be Miscarrying

Miscarriage basically refers to the phenomenon, when a developing embryo or the foetus  in a pregnant woman dies a natural death, before it can manage to survive on its own. The common signs of miscarriage are vaginal bleeding accompanied with pain. It leads to depression, anger and guilt. The reasons for miscarriage are manyincluding use of tobacco, smoking, diabetes, extreme obesity, drug or alcoholic addiction. Here are some important signs that indicate you might be miscarrying:

  1. Bleeding: Recurrence of bleeding, which keeps on starting and stopping indicates the downfall of your hormonal balance. You must get your pregnancy hormone levels checked. Very intense bleeding, which accounts for soaking your pad within an hour is an indication of the beginning of a miscarriage. However, bleeding is a common factor in normal pregnancy as well.
  2. Cramps: Severe cramps in the vaginal region, accompanied by very heavy breathing and suffocation are other signs that you might be headed for a miscarriage. Sometimes, bleeding occurs along with the cramping.
  3. Disappearance of Pregnancy Symptoms: If you are pregnant, but the signs and symptoms of pregnancy start disappearing, a miscarriage may be indicated. However, it might not be the first major signal. For normal pregnant women, the signs of pregnancy do not appear for many days. You may not feel nauseated or your breasts do not get sore. For ten to fourteen weeks, this phenomenon is a normal one. However, in case it continues for a more prolonged duration, it might be an early sign of miscarriage.
  4. Pregnancy test results vary between positive and negative: Results of a pregnancy test done very early may vary between positive and negative. This is completely normal. In case of obtaining the same results when you are already over two weeks pregnant, it may indicate a miscarriage. You might be having an ectopic pregnancy. Spotting is also noticed in the vaginal region. If you had a pregnancy test showing positive results, but the results come negative after re-taking the test a few weeks later, it is high time for you to consult a gynaecologist. You have to deal with ectopic pregnancy before choosing a surgical path. Varying results signify that something is wrong. The urine produced by the body is less concentrated.

A case of miscarriage is very painful for the pregnant woman as well as her family. You should keep healthy, and avoid all bad habits to keep away from miscarriage.

4823 people found this helpful

I had sex with my husband last month. After that I got my period S .in between no sex. But this month my period is late. So is there any chance of pregnancy.

CCT (UK) General Psychiatry, MD-Psychiatry, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
Psychiatrist, Delhi
I had sex with my husband last month. After that I got my period S .in between no sex. But this month my period is la...
If you didn't do intercourse after your last periods then there is no chance of you getting pregnant therefore relax. Best Wishes.
1 person found this helpful
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How aids spread is it spread through oral sex. Or vaginal liquids on toilet seats while using .how big spreads can you give a elaborate answer. Is it true some persons said medicine is found to cure hiv.

MBBS, PG Diploma (HIV Medicines)
HIV Specialist, Surat
How aids spread is it spread through oral sex. Or vaginal liquids on toilet seats while using .how big spreads can yo...
NO CURE FOR HIV HOW DO YOU GET HIV? Certain body fluids from an HIV-infected person can transmit HIV. These body fluids are: Blood Semen (cum) Pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum) Rectal fluids Vaginal fluids Breast milk These body fluids must come into contact with a mucous membrane or damaged tissue or be directly injected into your bloodstream (by a needle or syringe) for transmission to possibly occur. Mucous membranes are the soft, moist areas just inside the openings to your body. They can be found inside the rectum, the vagina or the opening of the penis, and the mouth. HOW IS HIV SPREAD? Having sex with someone who has HIV. In general: Anal sex (penis in the anus of a man or woman) is the highest-risk sexual behavior. Receptive anal sex (“bottoming”) is riskier than insertive anal sex (“topping”). Vaginal sex (penis in the vagina) is the second highest-risk sexual behavior. Having multiple sex partners or having sexually transmitted infections can increase the risk of HIV infection through sex. Sharing needles, syringes, rinse water, or other equipment (“works”) used to prepare injection drugs with someone who has HIV. Less commonly, HIV may be spread by: Being born to an infected mother. HIV can be passed from mother to child during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. Being stuck with an HIV-contaminated needle or other sharp object. This is a risk mainly for health care workers. Receiving blood transfusions, blood products, or organ/tissue transplants that are contaminated with HIV. Eating food that has been pre-chewed by an HIV-infected person. The contamination occurs when infected blood from a caregiver’s mouth mixes with food while chewing, and is very rare. Being bitten by a person with HIV. Each of the very small number of documented cases has involved severe trauma with extensive tissue damage and the presence of blood. There is no risk of transmission if the skin is not broken. Oral sex—using the mouth to stimulate the penis, vagina, or anus (fellatio, cunnilingus, and rimming). Giving fellatio (mouth to penis oral sex) and having the person ejaculate (cum) in your mouth is riskier than other types of oral sex. Contact between broken skin, wounds, or mucous membranes and HIV-infected blood or blood-contaminated body fluids. These reports have also been extremely rare. Deep, open-mouth kissing if the person with HIV has sores or bleeding gums and blood is exchanged. HIV is not spread through saliva. Transmission through kissing alone is extremely rare. HIV is NOT spread by: Air or water Insects, including mosquitoes or ticks Saliva, tears, or sweat Casual contact, like shaking hands, hugging or sharing dishes/drinking glasses Drinking fountains Toilet seats HIV is not spread through the air and it does not live long outside the human body. Having an undetectable viral load greatly lowers the chance that a person living with HIV can transmit the virus to a partner, but there is still some risk. “Viral load” refers to the amount of HIV in an infected person’s blood. An “undetectable viral load” is when the amount of HIV in a person’s blood is so low that it can’t be measured. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces a person’s viral load, ideally to an undetectable level, when taken consistently and correctly. However, a person with HIV can still potentially transmit HIV to a partner even if they have an undetectable viral load, because: HIV may still be found in a person’s genital fluids (e.g. Semen, vaginal fluids). The viral load test only measures virus in a person’s blood. A person’s viral load may go up between tests. When this happens, they may be more likely to transmit HIV to partners. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) increase viral load in a person’s genital fluids.
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Help me made this little bubbles in my vagina look like small pores is not no coke nor burn, also a white liquid comes out of my vagina is not runny and a white liquid without smell I am a virgin, I never dated what will it be?

B.Sc, BHMS
Homeopath, Kolkata
IT'S COMMON TO LITTLE GIRLS. IT'S CALLED LEUCORRHOEA [ WHITE DISCHARGE] 1.U NEED PROPER HYGIENE MAINTENANCE,DURING MENSTRUAL PERIOD, DURING URINATION,N EVACUATION . 2. TAKE SOME ANTE-FUNGAL N ANTE- HELMINTHIC DRUGS, WITH A CONSULTATION WITH DOCTOR
1 person found this helpful
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I am a unmarried girl age 24 my body is fatty with bulky stomach my menstruation cycle are always irregular and stay for month with heavy bleeding which led to weakness. I get tired soon and have regular pain in my joints and legs sometimes with heavy breathing and fast heart beat. Sometime I have swellings on my foot and face. I have problem of lack of sleep so I m not able to continue my exercises for long time as it results me more fatigue please give some suggestions.

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
I am a unmarried girl age 24 my body is fatty with bulky stomach my menstruation cycle are always irregular and stay ...
You may be anaemic check your haemoglobin level and improve it by eating green leafy vegetables jaggery banana, apple.when your haemoglobin level improve you can reduce weight and then your cycles will become regular
11 people found this helpful
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New Tests To Detect Increased Miscarriage Risks

MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS, FNB Reproductive Medicine, MRCOG
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
New Tests To Detect Increased Miscarriage Risks

Miscarriage Facts-

A miscarriage is defined as a pregnancy that ends before the 24th week. One in five pregnancies end this way.

The cause of a miscarriage is often not identified, but if it occurs during the first trimester it’s usually due to problems with the foetus, such as a chromosomal abnormality. This is unlikely to recur and doesn’t mean there is any problem with the mother or father’s chromosomes.

  • If a miscarriage happens during the second trimester (between weeks 14 and 26), it may be the result of an infection, a long-term health problem in the mother, food poisoning or a problem with the womb or cervix.
  • A woman will be referred for investigations if she has recurrent miscarriages (three or more in a row). About 1 in 100 women experience recurrent miscarriages and more than 60% of these women go on to have a successful pregnancy.
  • Women could be told from the beginning of pregnancy if they are at high risk of miscarriage or premature birth thanks to a highly accurate new tests.
  • Leading scientists have described as “very exciting” a breakthrough technique which can detect serious complications months in advance, giving doctors the chance to intervene and save lives.
  • It means that being told the likelihood of a devastating event could soon become a routine part of a doctor confirming a woman is pregnant.
  • Miscarriage charities welcomed the new technique.
  • Obstetricians can currently provide expecting mothers little or no warning of premature birth, miscarriage or preeclampsia, a life-threatening blood pressure disorder which kills up to 1,000 babies a year.
  • But researchers have now identified a handful of molecules unlocking the fundamental biology of these conditions, which are present long before any symptoms arise.
  • Scientists have so far devoted largely unsuccessful efforts to searching for blood biomarkers from the placenta.
  • However, the team at the Laboratory of Premature Medicine and Immunology in San Francisco turned their attention to the placental bed, the thick mucous membrane that lines the uterus during pregnancy.
  • Their discovery of 30 molecules relating to gene expression will enable newly pregnant women to undergo to a simple blood test able to determine their risk.
  • Britain has one of the highest rates of premature birth in Europe, with roughly one in nine babies born before 37 weeks gestation.
  • If doctors are aware a woman is at high risk of early delivery they can monitor her more closely and potentially use hormone drugs to delay the date of birth.
  • While there little that can be done to prevent miscarriage, the test can help women prepare for the eventuality.
  • By contrast, preeclampsia can be monitored and better managed the earlier it is detected.
  • Around three per cent of pregnant women suffer the condition where blood pressure is raised to levels that threaten both mother and child.
  • The only cure is to deliver the baby, meaning doctors can sometimes be forced to induce dangerously premature births.
  • Tim Child, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at Oxford University, said the new research was “very promising” and described the statistical relationship between the discovery of blood biomarkers in patients in the study and their subsequent complications as “very, very strong”.
  • Presented at the American Association of Reproductive Medicine annual congress in Texas, the four combined studies involved 160 births.
  • Searching for microRNA in blood immune cells, the team were able to predict miscarriage and late preeclampsia with around 90 per cent accuracy and premature birth before 34 weeks with around 89 per cent accuracy.
  • Premature birth between 34 and 38 weeks was predicted with 92 per cent accuracy.
  • Professor Simon Fishel, an IVF pioneer and founder of Care Fertility, said a warning highlighting blood flow problems in the placental bed, potential treatments include blood thinning drugs such as heparin
  • “Specialist obstetricians have means to help manage such disorders and early recognition of these complications is vital.
  • “Further support and evidence for this biomarker could indeed be an important tool in the management of these high risk pregnancies.”
  • He added that to be ‘forewarned is forearmed’ when dealing with pregnancy complications.
  • Specialist obstetricians have means to help manage such disorders and early recognition of these complications is vital.
  • Further support and evidence for this biomarker could indeed be an important tool in the management of these high risk pregnancies.’
  • “Our combined analysis supports the idea that the Great Obstetrical Syndromes have a common biological origin early in the first trimester that can be detected throughout the first trimester using peripheral blood cell microRNA,” the researchers said.
  • Roughly one in four pregnancies end in miscarriage, although this reduces to one in six pregnancies where the mother knows she is pregnant.
  • Around 80 per cent occur in the first 12 weeks’ gestation.
  • Barbara Hepworth-Jones, Vice Chair of the Miscarriage Association, said: “This is very welcome news.
  • “Much research is still needed before we fully understand the causes of pregnancy complications including miscarriage, and can then look for treatments.
  • “But this holds real hope for the future.”
  • A recent study found that giving aspirin to women at high risk of pre-eclampsia could reduce their chance of preterm pre-eclampsia by 60 per cent.
4 people found this helpful

Daily Regimen

MD
Ayurveda, Bagalkot
Daily Regimen

Follow of regular regimen of good conduct helpful to overcome many aliments of day today life.

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