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Dr. Rashmi Dalvi

Oncologist, Mumbai

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Dr. Rashmi Dalvi Oncologist, Mumbai
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Rashmi Dalvi
Dr. Rashmi Dalvi is a renowned Oncologist in Mumbai, Mumbai. She is currently practising at Bombay Hospital & Medical Research Centre in Mumbai, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Rashmi Dalvi on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Oncologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Oncologists with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Oncologists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English
Hindi

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Bombay Hospital & Medical Research Centre

#117, Marine Lines. Landmark: Next To Liberty Cinema, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

If IgM and IgG increase our decrease what will happen there can be chances of cancer or not.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
IgG and IgM are just antibodies and in some cancer they are found to be increased... But it is not always the case...
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Earlier my father was taking Urimax D for a slightly enlarged prostate. Was advised to take solid 8 mg 2 months back. But he is now not able to control his bladder and often is passing urine involuntarily. Shall h go back to Urimax D?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, FRCS - Urology, KTP Greenlight Laser Surgery Training
Urologist, Gurgaon
Earlier my father was taking Urimax D for a slightly enlarged prostate. Was advised to take solid 8 mg 2 months back....
He will benefit from a re-evaluation for his BPH and bladder irritability both. Needs full investigation including DRE ,CBC PSA KFT urine RM and Culture and sensitivity HBAIC, USG KUB, PVR, Uroflowmetry, Urodynamic study and decision for Medical or Surgical treatment thereafter. Urimax D with Solifenacin for sometime with a small course of antibiotic and bladder training and diabetic control is one option but after full urological evaluation.
1 person found this helpful
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Namaste sir/mam how conclusive is hiv1 hiv2 3rd generation. Negative. Blood test report after 6 MONTH and 18 DAYS later since last exposure. Any chance of late seroconversion after almost 7 month later since last exposure. Not any kind of chemotherapy are organ​ transplant not drug user and not immuno deficiency can any possibility late seroconversion. Are man is conclusive enough to rule out of any hiv infection after tested 6 months and 18 days later since last exposure.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Namaste sir/mam
how conclusive is hiv1 hiv2 3rd generation. Negative. Blood test report after 6 MONTH and 18 DAYS lat...
Dear lybrate-user. Thanks for the question. I can understand. The medical science and the reports you received after the hiv1 hiv2 3rd generation Blood test report after 6 MONTH and 18 DAYS is conclusive enough to rule out of any hiv infection after tested 6 months and 18 days later since last exposure. There are no chances of late seroconversion after almost 7 month later since last exposure. Take care.
1 person found this helpful
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A Quick Guide To The Stages Of Colon Cancer And How To Deal With Them

MD (Radiation Oncology), DNB (Radiotherapy)
Oncologist, Noida
A Quick Guide To The Stages Of Colon Cancer And How To Deal With Them

Cancer is the biggest menace humans have to encounter at this point in time. It is an issue that afflicts thousands of people worldwide and to this day this is no particular cure for this epidemic affliction. It’s an ugly disease that makes people suffer, drains every resource they own and puts a humongous strain not only on the patient, but also on everyone surrounding them, and interpersonal relationships. Cancer is a disease that progresses in stages and that is why it is important to get checked regularly. In case you are unfortunate enough to have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, or colon cancer, as it is commonly known, here is a quick guide to the different stages and how to proceed.

Stage Zero: It is also called carcinoma in situ. This is the earliest stage where the cancerous cells have not spread beyond the inner lining of the rectum or colon.
What to do: Stage zero colon cancer means that it hasn’t spread beyond the colon to other organs or areas so it only just requires surgery to remove the cancerous cells. This is called local excision performed using a colonoscope.

Stage One: This stage is where cancer has spread further into the lining of the colon but has not reached the outside walls of the colon or any other area for that matter.
What to do: If the cancer was removed at stage zero as a unit (the polyp) and nothing was left behind then nothing further needs doing. Although if the polyp is “high grade” then more surgery will be required, additionally if some get left behind after the first surgery then more will be required. Cancers that have developed otherwise require removing of a part of the colon, a partial colectomy.

Stage Two: The stage where cancer has advanced through the lining into growing over the walls of the colon but has not proceeded towards the lymph nodes.
What to do: Requires surgery, partial colectomy along with removing some of the surrounding lymph nodes. Chemotherapy post-surgery may be suggested by your doctor. Discuss before you agree to it.

Stage Three: Cancer has spread beyond the wall of the colon and reached the surrounding lymph nodes. It has not yet spread to other areas of the body or organs.
What to do: Partial colectomy including post-surgery chemotherapy but if the patient is not strong enough for surgery they are suggested chemotherapy or radiation therapy as an alternative.

Stage Four: Cancer has spread widely to several organs, to the liver, lungs, and even to the brain.
What to do: Surgery will not do much good, unless it can be used to remove the specific areas where the cancer is clustered. Mostly it is suggested to alleviate the pain but there is a chance that surgery might cure you too. Chemotherapy is absolutely required.

In stages 2, 3 and 4 there is an emerging role of targeted therapies along with the traditional chemotherapy. The same are chosen on basis of biomarkers. In liver metastases, there is now a strong role for SBRT to liver lesions for high local control and potential cure in many. SBRT is a valuable alternative to liver surgery.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3000 people found this helpful

Where do I start. I have alway had lumps in my breast. Always very lumpy. Went for a mammogram and ultra sound yesterday. Well I don't know why this one upset me so much. Was very teary. That the mammogram first to be told that they had to do more imaging on the left. Then the U/S and was told they.

MBBS, MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, FMAS, DMAS
Gynaecologist, Noida
Hello, There is a possibility that mammography detected some lesions which may look like a possible benign lesion or possibly a ductal ectasia. Did you notice ever blood coming to of nipples.
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My t. L. C is 11300. I am worried. And my. Platelets 250000/ please its blood cancer symptoms.

DNB, MBBS
Oncologist, Faridabad
No dear, tlc normally ranges from 4000-11000 and platelets from 1.5lakh to 4lakhs per cc mild derangement in tlc counts indicate acute infection may be cold cough or any other. So must not worry in leukaemias tlc counts increased to few lakhs mostly and blood pictureand bone marrow test is done to ascertain the cause.
12 people found this helpful
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Cervical Cancer: Symptoms and Treatments

MICOG, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
Play video

Lybrate - Dr.Nupur Gupta talks about Cervical Cancer.

Hello I am Dr. Nupur Gupta consultant gynecologist and obstetrician practicing in Gurgaon. Today I am going to talk about cervical cancer and its prevention. We all know it is one of the very common cancers amongst females all over the world especially in developing countries, it is more common in developed countries because of poor maternal health. The patients don’t want to go to the gynecologist. There are no guidelines which they know about and they can go for screening for cancer. There are various symptoms that women should know that how cervical cancer can be diagnosed and when is the right time for them to report to their gynecologist. Especially with women, it can happen at any age and especially women who are sexually active with multiple sexual partners who have been infected with human papillomavirus at some point during their life and who have irregular vaginal bleeding and who have bleeding after intercourse which is called Postcoital bleeding and who have intermenstrual bleeding or sometimes they have foul smelling and vaginal discharge. These are all the symptoms which should prompt any female in reproductive age or during menopause, postmenopause to come to a gynecologist and go for screening.

There are various guidelines which are developed in UK, in US and over world and especially in India for females. When should Pap smear be done in any female, is every three years after three samples are negative in three consecutive years. After the age of 60 to 65 years we do it every five years and so on. So women don’t need to fear about cervical cancer anymore because now-a-days research has led to development of a new vaccine, a new innovation in health care which is vaccine against human papillomavirus which leads to this kind of cancer in females. It can be given to adolescent girls from nine years of age onwards and now-a-days it is also part of Indian Academy of Pediatrics immunization in India.

In some countries even boys are given this vaccine because this virus is known to be transmitted from male to female. Upto 26 years of age, any women is eligible to take the vaccine and also women above 26 but who are not sexually active and never had intercourse till date. But taking the immunization doesn’t mean that Pap smear need not be done, still Pap smear screening is mandatory to detect cervical cancer as far as possible. So now we know that cervical cancer is preventable and there is a vaccine which is available, there is Pap smear that can be done in women who are sexually active.

So if you want to know more about this cancer and prevent yourself being affected by this kind of cancer and go for screening you can consult me on lybrate.com which has all modes of consultation audio, video or a text mode of consultation.













 

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