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Dr. Rashmi Chule

Psychiatrist, Mumbai

1500 at clinic
Dr. Rashmi Chule Psychiatrist, Mumbai
1500 at clinic
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Rashmi Chule
Dr. Rashmi Chule is a renowned Psychiatrist in Kandivali West, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. Rashmi Chule personally at Jobanputra Clinic in Kandivali West, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Rashmi Chule on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Psychiatrists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 43 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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#59 Balasinor Society,S V Road, Kandivali West. Landmark:-Opposite Fire Brigade, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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I having so much stress of my life how can I reduce my stress give me proper solution for that. I hope you understand my feeling and you reply question as soon as possible.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
I having so much stress of my life how can I reduce my stress give me proper solution for that. I hope you understand...
STRESS CONTROL There are many ways to tame your stress and keep it at bay. Here are 20 tips to tame your stress today, and keep the stress monsters at bay. 1.Perform diaphragmatic or deep breathing exercises. 2.Lie face down on the floor and begin breathing deeply and slowly, with your hands resting under your face. Do this for five minutes. 3.Sit in a reclining chair. Put a hand on your abdomen and a hand on your chest. As you breathe, make sure the hand on your abdomen is moving up and down rather than one on your chest. If the hand on your abdomen is moving you are breathing deeply and slowly. 4.Try progressive muscle relaxation or “deep muscle” relaxation. Progressively tense and relax each muscle group in your body. Learn the difference between muscle tension and relaxation. 5.Meditate. Use visualization or imagery to help you learn to be one with your thoughts. Sit quietly with your eyes closed, imagining the sights, sounds and smells of your favorite place, such as a beach or mountain retreat. 6.Exercise regularly or take up yoga. 7.Consult a psychologist about the use of biofeedback 8.Make time for music, art or other hobbies that help relax and distract you. 9.Learn to identify and monitor stressors. Come up with an organized plan for handling stressful situations. Be careful not to overgeneralize negative reactions to things. 10.Make a list of the important things you need to handle each day. Try to follow the list so you feel organized and on top of things. Put together a coping plan step by step so you have a sense of mastery. 11.Keep an eye on things that might suggest you’re not coping well. For example, are you smoking or drinking more, or sleeping less? 12.Keep a list of the large and little hassles in your day versus the major stressful events in your life. This helps you focus on the fact that you’re keeping track of and managing those as well as you can. 13.Set aside a time every day to work on relaxation. 14.Avoid using caffeine, alcohol, nicotine, junk food, binge eating and other drugs as your primary means for coping with stress. While they can be helpful once in awhile, using them as your only or usual method will result in longer-term problems, such as weight problems or alcoholism. 15.Learn to just say, “No” occasionally. It won’t hurt other people’s feelings as much as you think and is simply a method to be more assertive in your own life, to better help you meet your own needs. 16.Get the right amount of sleep. For most people, this is seven to nine hours a night. 17.Cultivate a sense of humor; laugh. 18.Research has shown that having a close, confiding relationship protects you from many stresses. 19.Don’t run from your problems! This only makes them worse. 20.Talk to your family and friends. See if they can help. If these tips don’t help, or you’ve tried a lot of them with little luck in better taming the stress in your life, it may be time to consider taking it up a notch. A mental health professional — such as a psychologist — can help teach you more effective methods for handling stress in a healthy way in your life. Such psychotherapy is short-term and time-limited, with a focus on helping you better deal with stress. Remember — we do have control over the stress and choices we make in our lives. It sometimes takes a little practice and effort to put some of these techniques into play in your life. But once you do so, you may be pleasantly surprised at the positive benefits you’ll receive If you need any prescription please consult me as we cannot prescribe in questions session. Regards.
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Hi I have problem I am getting nervous to talk with girls since last 2 years. Please help me for that. Please reply me for that.

BHMS
Homeopath, Raebareli
Hi I have problem I am getting nervous to talk with girls since last 2 years. Please help me for that. Please reply m...
Please be confident. Do meditation to relieve stress. Take morning exercise. Spend time with your friends outdoors. Do not engage yourself in mobiles always. Take five phos 4 tablets twice daily.
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Hi sir, I am 19 years old, but since 3 years, I feels symptoms like dementia. What can I do.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Hi sir, I am 19 years old, but since 3 years, I feels symptoms like dementia. What can I do.
Dear Lybrate user, At your age, Memory problems like amnesia, dementia etc are not common. Many young people are having problems with memory. These problems are either they are too busy or due to anxiety and stress. Busy people use organizers or employ a personal assistant because they can't remember every task. You need to understand this. If you still say, you are having memory problems, we need to check your memory using memory test. If you want more of my help in this regard, please contact me. Take care.
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A spark type feeling for a fraction of second and that travels to head and arms, causes increase in anxiety and palpitation. I am 48 years old male. I have checked with tmt and echo and no negative remarks found.

Hypnotherapist, DCS, BSIC, Advanced Trainee of Transactional Analysis, Advanced Skills in Counselling
Psychologist,
A spark type feeling for a fraction of second and that travels to head and arms, causes increase in anxiety and palpi...
This could be a symptom of underlying anxiety and panic about certain situations which you are not in control of. Please see a counsellor and psychiatrist to get your assessment and start the treatment. In the meantime start exercising every day so that you are able to manage stress better. Eat a high protein diet which helps in mood regulation and do yoga pranayama and meditation which helps immensely in anxiety and palpitations.
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Sir next month is my engagement. But I'm in fear to face people's tensed What to do.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Sir next month is my engagement. But I'm in fear to face people's tensed What to do.
You have to practise mind control as all people go through this engagement and marriage a a part of life. You can do meditaion for calmness
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My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms like reduced motivation, speech and activity are occurred. Now he is on medications for that. He is on tab quiet 25 mg (Quetiapine Fumarate INN 28.728 mg equivalent to 25 mg of Quetiapine) once daily. 1 hour after taking this medicine he gets calm and sleeps. Even if he wakes up in the middle of the night, he was not in his senses at that time. Most of the time he urinates while he is asleep. Even he forgets to go to washroom and he poops in his pants but he forgets to wash himself. His condition is not improving. Kindly please suggest suitable medication which can cure above said things of his health.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, del...
Hi there ~ Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead Improving Emotional Health Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one. Preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care As you come to grips with an Alzheimer’s or other dementia diagnosis, you may be dealing with a whole range of emotions and concerns. You’ll no doubt be worried about how your loved one will change, how you’ll keep him or her comfortable, and how much your life will change. You’ll also likely be experiencing emotions such as anger, grief, and shock. Adjusting to this new reality is not easy. It’s important to give yourself some time and to reach out for help. The more support you have, the better you will be able to help your loved one. While some of these tips are directed specifically at Alzheimer’s patients, they may equally apply to those with other types of dementia as well, including vascular and mixed dementia. Early-stage Alzheimer’s care preparations There are some Alzheimer’s care preparations that are best done sooner rather than later. It may be hard to consider these questions at first, as it means thinking about a time when your loved one is already well down the road of his or her Alzheimer’s journey. However, putting preparations in place early helps a smoother transition for everyone. Depending on the stage of diagnosis, include the person with Alzheimer’s in the decision-making process as much as possible. If their dementia is at a more advanced stage, at least try to act on what their wishes would be. Questions to consider in preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care: Who will make healthcare and/or financial decisions when the person is no longer able to do so? While a difficult topic to bring up, if your loved one is still lucid enough, getting their wishes down on paper means they’ll be preserved and respected by all members of the family. Consider meeting with an elder law attorney to best understand your options. You’ll want to consider power of attorney, both for finances and for healthcare. If the person has already lost capacity, you may need to apply for guardianship/conservatorship. More information can be found in the Resources section below. How will care needs be met? Sometimes family members assume that a spouse or nearest family member can take on caregiving, but that is not always the case. Caregiving is a large commitment that gets bigger over time. The person with Alzheimer’s will eventually need round-the-clock care. Family members may have their own health issues, jobs, and responsibilities. Communication is essential to make sure that the needs of the Alzheimer’s patient are met, and that the caregiver has the support to meet those needs. Where will the person live? Is his or her own home appropriate, or is it difficult to access or make safe for later? If the person is currently living alone, for example, or far from any family or other support, it may be necessary to relocate or consider a facility with more support. Find out what assistance your medical team can provide in these areas. In some countries, you can also hire a care manager privately. Geriatric care managers can provide an initial assessment as well as assistance with managing your case, including crisis management, interviewing in-home help, or assisting with placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Developing day-to-day routines Having a general daily routine in Alzheimer’s and dementia care helps caregiving run smoothly. These routines won’t be set in stone, but they give a sense of consistency, which is beneficial to the Alzheimer’s patient even if they can’t communicate it. While every family will have their own unique routine, you can get some great ideas from your medical team or Alzheimer’s support group, especially regarding establishing routines to handle the most challenging times of day, such as evenings. Keep a sense of structure and familiarity. Try to keep consistent daily times for activities such as waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, receiving visitors, and bedtime. Keeping these things at the same time and place can help orientate the person. Let the person know what to expect even if you are not sure that he or she completely understands. You can use cues to establish the different times of day. For example, in the morning you can open the curtains to let sunlight in. In the evening, you can put on quiet music to indicate it’s bedtime. Involve the person in daily activities as much as they are able. For example, a person may not be able to tie their shoes, but may be able to put clothes in the hamper. Clipping plants outside may not be safe, but the person may be able to weed, plant, or water. Use your best judgment as to what is safe and what the person can handle. Communication tips As your loved one’s Alzheimer’s progresses, you will notice changes in communication. Trouble finding words, increased hand gestures, easy confusion, even inappropriate outbursts are all normal. Here are some do’s and don’ts on communicating: Communication Do's and Don'ts? Do Avoid becoming frustrated by empathizing and remembering the person can’t help their condition. Making the person feel safe rather than stressed will make communication easier. Take a short break if you feel your fuse getting short. Keep communication short, simple, and clear. Give one direction or ask one question at a time. Tell the person who you are if there appears to be any doubt. Call the person by name. Speak slowly. The person may take longer to process what’s being said. Use closed-ended questions which can be answered “yes” or “no.” For example, ask, “Did you enjoy the beef at dinner?” instead of “What did you have for dinner?” Find a different way to say the same thing if it wasn’t understood. Try a simpler statement with fewer words. Use distraction or fibs if telling the whole truth will upset the person with dementia. For example, to answer the question, “Where is my mother?” it may be better to say, “She’s not here right now” instead of “She died 20 years ago.” Use repetition as much as necessary. Be prepared to say the same things over and over as the person can’t recall them for more than a few minutes at a time. Use techniques to attract and maintain the person’s attention. Smile, make eye contact, use gestures, touch, and other body language. Don't Ever say things like: “Do you remember?” “Try to remember!” “Did you forget?” “How could you not know that? Ask questions that challenge short-term memory such as “Do you remember what we did last night?” The answer will likely be “no,” which may be humiliating for the person with dementia. Talk in paragraphs. Instead, offer one idea at a time. Point out the person’s memory difficulty. Avoid remarks such as “I just told you that.” Instead, just repeat it over and over. Talk in front of the person as if he or she were not present. Always include the person in any conversation when they are physically present. Use lots of pronouns such as "there, that, those, him, her, it. Use nouns instead. For example, instead of "sit there" say "sit in the blue chair. Use slang or unfamiliar words. The person may not understand the latest terms or phrases. Use patronizing language or “baby talk.” A person with dementia will feel angry or hurt at being talked down to. Use sarcasm or irony, even if meant humorously. Again, it can cause hurt or confusion. Planning activities and visitors As you develop daily routines, it’s important to include activities and visitors. You want to make sure that the Alzheimer’s patient is getting sensory experiences and socialization, but not to the point of getting overstimulated and stressed. Here are some suggestions for activities: Start with the person’s interests. Ask family and friends for memories of interests the person used to have. You’ll want to tailor the interests to the current level of ability so the person doesn’t get frustrated. Vary activities to stimulate different senses of sight, smell, hearing, and touch. For example, you can try singing songs, telling stories, movement such as dance, walking, or swimming, tactile activities such as painting, working with clay, gardening, or interacting with pets. Planning time outdoors can be very therapeutic. You can go for a drive, visit a park, or take a short walk. Even sitting on a balcony or in the backyard can be relaxing. Consider outside group activities designed for those with Alzheimer’s. Senior centers or community centers may host these types of activities. You can also look into adult day care programs, which are partial or full days at a facility catering to older adults and/or dementia patients. Visitors and social events Visitors can be a rich part of the day for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It can also provide an opportunity for you as the caregiver to socialize or take a break. Plan visitors at a time of day when your loved one can best handle them. Brief visitors on communication tips if they are uncertain and suggest they bring memorabilia your loved one may like, such as a favorite old song or book. Family and social events may also be appropriate, as long as the Alzheimer’s patient is comfortable. Focus on events that won’t overwhelm the person; excessive activity or stimulation at the wrong time of day might be too much to handle. Handling challenges in Alzheimer's and dementia care One of the most painful parts of Alzheimer’s disease is watching a loved one display behavior you never would have thought possible. Alzheimer’s can cause substantial changes in how someone acts. This can range from the embarrassing, such as inappropriate outbursts, to wandering, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Everyday tasks like eating, bathing, and dressing can become major challenges. Painful as some behaviors are, it’s critical not to blame yourself or try to handle all the changes in behavior alone. As challenging behavior progresses, you may find yourself too embarrassed to go out, for example, or to seek respite care. Unfortunately, difficult behavior is part and parcel of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t isolate yourself. Ask for help from the medical team and reach out to caregiver groups for support. There are ways to modify or better accommodate problem behaviors. Both the environment you create at home and the way you communicate with your loved one can make a substantial difference. Considering long-term Alzheimer's and dementia care It’s the nature of Alzheimer’s disease to progressively get worse as memory deteriorates. In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one will likely need round-the-clock care. Thinking ahead to these possibilities can help make decisions easier. To find links to organizations in your area that may be able to help, see Resources and References below. Care at home There are several options for extending care at home: In-home help refers to caregivers that you can hire to provide assistance for your loved one. In-home help ranges from a few hours a week of assistance to live-in help, depending on your needs. You’ll want to evaluate what sort of tasks you’d like help with, how much you can afford to spend, and what hours you need. Getting help with basic tasks like housekeeping, shopping, or other errands can also help you provide more focused care for your loved one. Day programs, also called adult day care, are programs that typically operate weekdays and offer a variety of activities and socialization opportunities. They also provide the chance for you as the caregiver to continue working or attend to other needs. There are some programs that specialize in dementia care. Respite care. Respite care is short-term care where your loved one stays in a facility temporarily. This gives you a block of time to rest, travel, or attend to other things. Is it time to move? As Alzheimer’s progresses, the physical and mental demands on you as caregiver can gradually become overwhelming. Each day can bring more challenges. The patient may require total assistance with physical tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as greater overall supervision. At some point, you won’t be able to leave your loved one alone. Nighttime behaviors may not allow you to sleep, and with some patients, belligerent or aggressive behaviors may exceed your ability to cope or feel safe. Every situation is different. Sometimes the gap can be bridged by bringing in additional assistance, such as in-home help or other family members to share the caregiving burden. However, it is not a sign of weakness if moving to your loved one to a facility seems like the best plan of care. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you’re overwhelmed by stress and fatigue, it’s difficult to maintain your caregiving standards. If the person with Alzheimer’s is living alone, or you as the primary caregiver have health problems, this option may need to be considered sooner rather than later. When considering your caregiving options, it’s important to consider whether you are able to balance your other obligations, either financial or to other family members. Will you be able to afford appropriate in-home coverage if you can’t continue caregiving? Talk to your loved one’s medical care team for their perspective as well. Evaluating an assisted living facility or nursing home If the best choice is to move the Alzheimer’s patient to a facility, it doesn’t mean you will no longer be involved in their care. You can still visit regularly and ensure your loved one gets the care he or she needs. Even if you are not yet ready to make that step, doing some initial legwork might save a lot of heartache in the case of a crisis where you have to move quickly. The first step is finding the right place for your loved one. Choosing a facility There are two main types of facilities that you will most likely have to evaluate for a loved one with Alzheimer’s: an assisted living facility or a nursing home. Assisted Living Assisted living is an option for those who need help with some activities of daily living. Some facilities provide minor help with medications as well. Staff is available twenty-four hours a day, but you will want to make sure they have experience handling residents with Alzheimer’s disease. Also be clear about what stage your loved may need to move to a higher level of care. Nursing homes Nursing homes provide assistance in both activities of daily living and a high level of medical care. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is almost always on the premises. Skilled nursing care providers and medical professionals such as occupational or physical therapists are also available. How do I choose a facility? Once you’ve determined the appropriate level of care, you’ll want to visit the facility—both announced and unannounced—to meet with the staff and otherwise evaluate the home. You will also want to evaluate the facility based on their experience with Alzheimer’s residents. Facilities that cater specifically for Alzheimer’s patients should have a designated area, often called a special care unit in the U.S. For residents with dementia. Questions to ask such a facility include: Policy and procedures – Does the unit mix Alzheimer’s patients with those with mental illness, which can be dangerous? Does the program require the family to supply a detailed social history of the resident (a good sign)? Environment – Is the unit clean? Is the dining area large enough for all residents to use it comfortably? Are the doors alarmed or on a delayed opening system to prevent wandering? Is the unit too noisy? Staffing – What is the ratio of residents to staff? (5 to 1 during the day, 9 to 1 at night is normal). What is staff turnover like? How do they handle meals and ensure adequate hydration, since the person can often forget to eat or drink? How do they assess unexpressed pain—if the Alzheimer’s resident has pain but cannot communicate it? Staff training – What training for Alzheimer’s care do they have? Does the facility provide staff with monthly in-service training on Alzheimer’s care? Activities – Is there an activity plan for each resident based on the person’s interests and remaining cognitive strengths? Are residents escorted outside on a daily basis? Are regular outings planned for residents? Services – Does the unit provide hospice services? What were the findings in the most recent state survey? What to expect during a transition Moving is a big adjustment both for the person with Alzheimer’s and you as their caregiver. Your loved one is moving to a new home with new faces. You are adjusting from being the person providing hands-on care to being an advocate. Remember to give yourself and the Alzheimer’s patient time to adjust. If you’re expecting to move, try to have essentials packed and ready to go, and as many administrative details taken care of as possible, as sometimes beds can come up quickly. Work closely with staff regarding your loved one’s needs and preferences. An extra familiar face during moving day, such as another relative or close friend, can also help. Each person adjusts differently to this transition. Depending on your loved one’s needs, you may either need to visit more frequently or give your loved one their own space to adjust. As the adjustment period eases, you can settle into the visiting pattern that is best for both of you. I hope this helps.
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I depressed lot due to love failure. I can't come out of it. Guide to get relief.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
I depressed lot due to love failure. I can't come out of it. Guide to get relief.
Breaking up is not easy, especially if the relationship lasted for a long time. But you will need to accept the reality and move on. This fixation on her must die out eventually. You must first exorcise her out of your mind. You can either do that by talking her out of your emotions first to a counselor and then starting on a new relationship by completely walking away from the past. You must express your bitterness and all the fond memories with the intention of purging her out the system. The professional will expertly guide you through the motion of exhaustively clearing away all memories along with the emotions so that you will be free of the ghosts of the past and are able to venture into new relationships. Once you have done that the memories will gradually fade away but the huge advantage you will have is that the emotions attached to those memories will be minus the energy of the feelings and they will become impotent. In the meantime I hope you have cleared your belongings and surroundings of all memories of this person; and also that you do not haunt the places and situations you used to visit. If she has ditched you, you must learn to forgive her for your own sake and live a life free of her eventually in the mind and then in the heart. She is now history, and has probably happily moved on. You need to be thankful that you were not betrothed to her when she dumped you: that would have been worse. And you need to learn not to give yourself to someone so much if the time was not ripe or suitable to do so. Now you should pitch yourself into a new relationship but do not focus too much into the serious end of the outcome but on the moment-to-moment development to see how it all unfolds to really enjoy that person. If you continue to cling on to her memories even after that, you may have some attachment problems too to explore with the counselor. To get out of the depression you must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, and wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, eat more of proteins and vegetables, attend yoga classes etc. Watch a lot of sitcoms on tv or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least 30 minutes but not in the scotching heat. I hope you can find someone to love and be loved soon. Whatever happens please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three things, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in god to alleviate your sufferings. If you are still not relieved from the depression, then go first to a counselor.
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I'm 21 years old studying Btech feeling very stressed during at the time of reading small contents and can't pay attention towards study could you pls suggest me.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
I'm 21 years old studying Btech feeling very stressed during at the time of reading small contents and can't pay atte...
I can give you some study tips Study Tips to Improve Your Learning Study Tip 1: Underlining Underlining is one of the simplest and best known study tips. It’s easy to highlight the most significant parts of what you’re reading. One key sentence per paragraph and a few important phrases here and there. You can only retain a certain amount so it’s best to retain the most important information. Study Tip 2: Make your own note and taking notes is one of the most widespread study skills out there. Essentially the aim of note-taking is to summarise lectures or articles in your own words so you can easily remember the ideas. Study Tip 3: Mind mapping A good Mind map can save you many hours of study and further consolidate your knowledge for your exams. Mind Maps are an extremely versatile tools. They can be used for brainstorming, outlining essays or study topics and for general exam preparation, ExamTime offers the ability to create Mind Maps quickly and easily which makes them the ideal tool when it comes to exams. Study Tip 4: Flash cards:- Using these are a particularly effective method of learning when trying to assimilate different facts, dates, formulas or vocabulary. Subjects such as History, Physics, Maths, Chemistry, Geography or any language are made much easier if you incorporate Flashcards in to your study. Study Tip 5: Case Studies Sometimes it can be difficult to grasp the implications of some theories. This is where studying case studies can be a big help. Case studies can help you visualise a theory and place it in a more familiar and realistic context. This is especially useful in business or law subjects. Study Tip 6: Quizzes are an excellent way to review study notes in the weeks and days before an exam. Quizzes can show where your strengths and weaknesses are, so it allows you to focus your efforts more precisely. Moreover, if you share your Study Quiz with your classmates and test each other as much as possible you can discover even more details and areas you may have overlooked. So before any exam, make sure you create and share a bunch of different Quizzes with your Friends. Study Tip 7: Brainstorming This is another study technique that is ideal for studying with friends and/or classmates. Brainstorming is a great way to expand every possible idea out of any topic. Just get a bunch of friends together and shoot the breeze, there are no wrong answers when brainstorming – just talk and capture the ideas, you can review afterward. Study Tip 8: Mnemonic Rules Mnemonics are especially useful when memorising lists and sets. Mnemonics rules basically work by associating certain concepts with other concepts that are more familiar to us. There are many different ways to make mnemonics and these can be individual to the person. Study Tip 9: ORGANISE your study One of the most effective study skills is also one of the most often overlooked; this is organising your study. Creating a TIME TABLE gives you goals and a time in which to achieve them. Having a study timetable as you study is greatly motivational Study Tip 10: Drawing Many people find it easier to recall images rather than text that is why they are better able to memorise concepts if they associate them with pictures or drawings.
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My mom is behaving like mad. Talking to herself. She is saying that she is hearing some voices. Not sleeping in night. She also said I am hearing buzz sound every time. Is it related to ear problem or any other Mental Disorder?

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Faridabad
My mom is behaving like mad. Talking to herself. She is saying that she is hearing some voices. Not sleeping in night...
Dear lybrate-user, your mother might be suffering from schizophrenia. She need to consult psychiatrist for treatment.
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How To Eat Right To Reduce Stress

M.Sc. in Dietetics and Food Service Management , Post Graduate Diploma In Computer Application, P.G.Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics , B.Sc.Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
How To Eat Right To Reduce Stress

How to eat right to reduce stress

During times of stress, we often turn to traditional "comfort" foods such as macaroni and cheese, pizza, and ice cream. Ironically, these high-fat foods are usually the worst possible choices because they can make us feel lethargic and less able to deal with stress. Not only that, but stress can drive up our blood pressure and raise serum cholesterol levels, wreaking havoc on our arteries and increasing our risk of heart attack.

Stress-relief-diet

The best solution? Low-fat, high-fiber, carbohydrate-rich meals with plenty of fruits and vegetables. They soothe us without sapping our energy and give us the nutrients we need to boost our immune system. Here's a guide to which foods reduce stress and which foods make it worse:

Foods to include

High-fiber, carbohydrate-rich foods: scientists believe carbohydrates cause the brain to produce more serotonin, a hormone that relaxes us. And lots of fiber is helpful in preventing late-night binging. Some examples of healthy comfort food include baked sweet potatoes, minestrone soup, or sautéed vegetables over rice.

Fruits and vegetables: chronic stress can weaken our ability to fight disease. By upping our intake of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, we can boost our immune system. Acorn squash and carrots, for example, are great sources of the antioxidant beta-carotene. And citrus fruits provide plenty of vitamin c, another stress-busting antioxidant.

Foods to avoid

High-fat foods: fatty foods such as meat or cheese dishes and many baked goods thicken our blood which in turn makes us feel tired, even lethargic. This is clearly not a good way to reduce stress! even just one high-fat meal can increase our risk of a heart attack.

Caffeine: many of us deal with a stress-induced lack of sleep by turning to coffee, tea, and colas. Unfortunately, caffeine stays in our systems longer than many realize. Cutting back on caffeine can help with both sleeping problems and jitters.

Sugar: as a carbohydrate, sugar tends to calm us. The problem with sugar is that it's a simple carbohydrate so it enters and leaves the bloodstream rapidly, causing us to, in effect" crash" on the other hand, complex carbohydrates? such as pasta, beans, and lentils, the starchy parts of foods? soothe without bringing us down.

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Does homeopathy help in dealing with sensitivity and anxiety when these are part of personal traits/ characteristics?

MD, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Delhi
Does homeopathy help in dealing with sensitivity and anxiety when these are part of personal traits/ characteristics?
Nothing helps in the personality traits. It is only the conscious efforts and the therapies that can help you modify them.
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I am suffering from anxiety. Doctor give me tatracylic antidepressant tablet 50 mg morning and 50 mg evening. I am also have ibs .Doctor it is also related to anxiety. If I eat chicken it cause gas and acidity. please answer me.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
I am suffering from anxiety. Doctor give me tatracylic antidepressant tablet 50 mg morning and 50 mg evening. I am al...
Yes. Anxiety is very much related to IBS and has a bi-directional relationship. What is the name of the medicine. IBS with Anxiety has to be treated by a gastro in liasion with a psychiatrist. All the best.
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Post Graduate Diploma In Rehabilitation Psychology, M A Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Bhopal
Its time to give words to your distress. Speak up for yourself let others know what you feel like.
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Living with Parkinson's Disease

MBBS, MD - Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Pain Management Specialist, Jaipur

Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease affects the part of the brain that controls muscle movement. The exact cause of this disease is not known, but there is a decrease in a chemical called dopamine in the brains of people with Parkinson's. There is no cure for Parkinson's, but it often progresses slowly and the signs can be managed.


Signs:
The 4 most common signs of Parkinson's are:

  •   tremors or shaking when at rest
  •   muscle stiffness
  •   slowed movement or problems starting a movement
  •   problems with balance and movement

As these signs worsen, you may also have trouble walking, talking, swallowing or doing simple tasks such as bathing or dressing. As the disease progresses, other signs such as pain, bowel or bladder problems and sleep problems may occur.

Care issues:
When you start to show signs of this disease, you should consult a neurologist for diagnosis and start medicines. Then you should consult a physiatrist or rehabilitation physician for making rehabilitation plan to prevent early onset of disability. Rehabilitation plan contains medicines, physical therapy or specific exercises, occupation-specific advises brace, etc.
The physical therapist can help you learn exercises that can help you with movements.
You may need to work with your neurologist or physiatrist to make adjustments in your medicines to keep your signs controlled. Over time, many people have side effects from the medicines used to treat Parkinson's disease. You may also need occupational therapy or speech therapy to deal with signs as the disease progresses. As your signs get worse, surgery may be an option to reduce tremors.


Things you can do to manage your signs:

When walking

  •   walk slowly with a straight posture and with your legs further apart.
  • Think about taking big steps to help keep your steps more normal.
  •   use a 4-prong cane or a walker if needed.
  •   if you become stuck or freeze in one place, rock gently from side to side or pretend to step over an object on the floor.
  •   place tape strips on the floor to guide you through your house.
  • Remove area rugs and furniture from your walking path.
  •   stand up from a chair or bed slowly to avoid feeling dizzy or lightheaded.

When using the bathroom
  install grab bars on the walls beside toilets and inside showers and bathtubs to help you stand up.

  •   use a shower chair inside the shower.
  •   install an elevated toilet seat to make standing up easier after using the toilet.
  •   shave with an electric razor.

When dressing

  •   wear loafers or shoes with velcro.
  •   wear simple dresses or pants with elastic waistbands such as sweatpants.

When eating or drinking:

  •   use a cup with a large handle to make it easier to hold.
  •   use a bowl instead of a plate to limit spills and make it easier to scoop up food.
  • Work closely with your rehabilitation team to manage your signs of Parkinson's disease. Rehabilitation can significantly improve your quality of life.
     
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I am 17 year old student and my my mind never took in study what can I do for this.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear, You must be able to understand Concentration, attention span, recollection and distraction. If you are able to watch a movie for two hours continuously, if you are able to play a game for an hour, then you do not have any concentration problems. You can't be attentive towards your studies because you are not interested in it. You are able to watch movie and play game because you are interested in it. Human cannot be attentive towards anything for more than 10 minutes. Then you should study in such a way that your attention is continued and make the subjects are interesting to you. Effective learning techniques should help you. Recollection depends on anxiety, stress and other physical and circumstantial factors. Distractions while studying are plentiful. You should be able to overcome distractions or avoid distractions. Please understand the above. Change your study style and attitude accordingly. Please post a private question to me and I will help you with "effective learning" techniques. Take care.
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Dirnk karna kay sheht ke liye kitna fayda hai ar kitna nuksan hai deli pine waloka sharir pe kay effects hota ha please ask me ye mere pati ke liy sawal hai oh deli drink karte hai.

M.D. - Ayurveda, B.A.M.S (Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine& Surgery), N.D.D.Y(Diploma in Naturopathy,Diploma in Yoga)
Ayurveda, Pune
Dirnk karna kay sheht ke liye kitna fayda hai ar kitna nuksan hai deli pine waloka sharir pe kay effects hota ha plea...
Drinking daily will affect liver in long run. Liver cirrhosis might lead to complications in future. So daily drinking is not advised. If not possible to stop, wine be preferred but not more than 60 ml per day.
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Cannabis An Ancient Treatment For Epilepsy

Advance Course in Neuro linguistic Programming, Diploma In Dyslexic Studies, Masters In Psychological Counselling
Psychologist, Mumbai

Cbd oil for epilepsy


Cannabis indica and cannabis sativa have been used therapeutically for thousands of years, including for the treatment of epilepsy. Today, cannabis is viewed as a controversial medical subject - thanks in large part to prohibition and decades of misinformation - but prior to 1937's 'marihuana tax act' cannabis was accepted by doctors and patients as a true medicine, and considered one of the safest and most effective forms of seizure control medication.

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How many acupuncture treatments does it take to relieve stress? Is this something that needs continual treatment?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
How many acupuncture treatments does it take to relieve stress? Is this something that needs continual treatment?
Stress is more psychological rather then physical. Therefore, stress management therapy is more effective than acupuncture. Take care.
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