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Dr. Rajiv V.Gaikwad

Veterinarian, Mumbai

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Dr. Rajiv V.Gaikwad Veterinarian, Mumbai
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I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Rajiv V.Gaikwad
Dr. Rajiv V.Gaikwad is a renowned Veterinarian in Parel, Mumbai. He is currently associated with Pets Clinic in Parel, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Rajiv V.Gaikwad on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Shop No.14, Topiwala Building, Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar Road, Parel. Landmark: Near ITC Hotel, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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I'm having Labrador of age 2 months when it was baby his fur is too shiny and good but now it is dull is thr any remedy for it and any tonics for his bone and body weight.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use verol multivitamin tonic with calcium tonic and also give him nutricoat plus advantage for few months you can appreciate changes
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5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Saharanpur
Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule! Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food and hookworms live on blood causing anemia.
Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms! We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites – they have already caused damage at this point.
so always remember about deworming of your loving pet.
4 people found this helpful

Sir my dashound dog is 7 years old, eating well no toilet and urine problems, but its upper abdominal part is paining severely. Cannot touch at all. Walking slowly only. Always sleeping difficult to get up in back area. What is the problem and remedy. Kindly advise.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear treat like following manner treat with noroxin tablet (one tablet in morning/evening) and tablet metacin 500mg one tablet morning/evening.
9 people found this helpful
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My kitten abscess wound has got maggots in her. She is 3 months old how to kill maggots at home.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Please apply maggout spray on the wound. And take it to a vet. As it may require wound dressing and antibiotic injection also. After wards you can dress it at home itself and also oral medicines.
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6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
673 people found this helpful

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
What are the rules every dog owner should follow?

The number one way to communicate to a dog that you are his pack leader is to take him/her for a Pack walk daily, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the human who is holding the lead. This is most important for all dogs, as in a dog?s mind, the leader always leads the way.
A dog must not be allowed to sniff or eliminate anywhere he wishes, but only where you allow him.
The dog should be concentrating on following the human.
All humans must eat before the dogs.
No table scraps should be fed to the dog during a meal.
Feedings must be at a scheduled time.
Humans must not let the dog go through any doorway first.
When you have left the house or the room, even for a minute and come back, ignore the dog for a few minutes.
A simple obedience command should be given before any pleasurable interaction with the dog. A child in the house should give the commands at least once a day and reward the dog with a treat when the command is followed.
You should not lie on the floor to watch TV when the dog is around, as a human should never put himself in an equal or lesser height position than the dog.
You are the first one who greets newcomers; the dog is the last that gets attention.
If a dog is lying in your path, do not walk around the dog, either make the dog move or step over the dog.
If you establish eye contact with the dog, the dog must avert his gaze first. Tell the children not to have staring contest with the dog.
Dogs must not sleep in your bed.
Games of fetch or play with toys must be started and ended by the human.
Dog should not be allowed to lie on your furniture.
No tug?of?war, as this is a game of power and you may lose the game giving the dog reinforcement (in the dog?s mind) of top dog.
Dogs need to be taught ?drop it? or ?release? command.
Dogs should not be allowed to pull on the leash.
When you put the food dish down, the dog must wait until you give the "OK" to eat it.
Small dogs or puppies who demand to be picked up or put down should not get what they want until they sit or do another acceptable quiet behavior.
Dogs should never be left unsupervised with children or anyone who cannot maintain leadership over the dog.
Last but certainly not least... avoid emotions, when you are around your dog. Your dog can sense these emotions and will see you as weak.
22 people found this helpful

My 7 years old labrador has been dull for the last 15 days, appetite normal, had blood in stool 2 days ago, blood test revealed low BUN at 7.24, elevated sgot at 69.63, elevated alkaline phosphatase at 107. Xrays and ultrasound revealed enlarged spleen. Stool test showed presence of pus cells, blood. He has had thyroid issue for the last 3 years for which we give him thyronorm 100 daily. What disease could he possibly have?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
How are his platelets? bun could be low because of long term fasting or because of reduced generation by liver. In latter case, get him blood ammonia levels checked. Its a test to done immediately (within 1 hr latest) after the blood is drawn. I would not consider sgpo and alkaline phosphatase elevated at those levels, however laboratory standards are different everywhere. Discuss following things with your vet. 1) contribution of ammonia levels in dullness. 2) possible underdosing of thyroid hormone supplements. For which, you can sent his blood 4-6 hrs post tablet, to see if 100mcg dose is helping you to achieve normal blood levels. If not, you may need to increase dosing and make it twice daily, after discussing with your vet. Hope this is helpful.
16 people found this helpful

I have a pet of breed german shepherd he is not able to excrete properly his diet is good wht shd i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be digestion complication . Please take it to a vet and also concentrate fibre content in the dog as it will also lead to such compliances
1 person found this helpful
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