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Dr. Rahul Sankhe

Veterinarian, Mumbai

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Dr. Rahul Sankhe Veterinarian, Mumbai
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Rahul Sankhe
Dr. Rahul Sankhe is an experienced Veterinarian in Virar East, Mumbai. He is currently practising at Dr Rahul Sankhe Pet Clinic in Virar East, Mumbai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Rahul Sankhe on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dr Rahul Sankhe Pet Clinic

4/B, Kalpa Prabha, Ramboin Complex, Kala Hanuman Mandir, Virar East, ThaneMumbai Get Directions
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

I want to ask you one question. My pet dog has bitten my mom around 50 days before. My dog is healthy now. She has not taken any vaccines till now. I am quite sure that my dog is totally healthy. But I have fear about carrier state of the dog. Can a Asymptotic (just a carrier without showing any symptoms) dog cause rabies in human. Was there any case you have noticed before in which owner dies but not the dog? Is it possible. I am very frightened about this. Please reply me as soon as possible.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Good morning. The first thing to be assured is that the dog which has bitten should be regularly vaccinated for anti rabies vaccine. If the recent vaccination dose is overdue then Ill personally recommend not to waste anytime in doing further research and get your mother vaccinated for the 7 days schedule as per routine. Starts from the day of bite. In case you have missed initial doses then please let me know.
1 person found this helpful
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

My dog just bite me but he's fully vaccines! Should I do anything or anything will happen?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
As long as your pet has received yearly rabies vaccines and he is disease free - nothing should happen to you. Its however wise to show your bite wound to a human physician and take his opinion. Take care.
11 people found this helpful

I have a labra puppy 6 weeks old. His mother is no more. I worried about his health and food. How much quantity he needs. His weight is just 0.8kg. And Today after 18 hours he pooped at last but just after an hour and his meal. He pooped again in a minute. This time the poop was a 20% liquid and 80% solid. Is it to worry about pooping twice or thrice in row. Please help. I am totally unknow about the puppy care.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
Donot overfeed the puppy keep hom on milk wirh virtually no solids for atleast another week or so. The point is stomach shoild stablise give some antacid syrup that human use 2 tsf 3 times a day.
1 person found this helpful
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Hi Sir, Two three people said that after dog bite, we should not give head bath and my daughter (3 yrs. 10 months) should not get cold. Is this true?

General Physician, Lucknow
Hi Sir, Two three people said that after dog bite, we should not give head bath and my daughter (3 yrs. 10 months) sh...
No these are wrong hearsays. Please do not follow them. Immediatley after a dog bite try to wash the wound with mild soap and running tap water.
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I think my dog have an ear infection. What should i do? and he does not let me touch his ear.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Ear infection is painful so u hv to show to vet so he will put muzzle or under sedation he will clean ear and tell proper medicine
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Good morning all, I have pug of 1 year, now days he is not eating much food. His epetite seems to be reduced, just need to confirm is it normal or should I take any steps. Kindly help. Thank you, Achal

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Hi. Reduced appetite may be considered normal as long as his activities, water intake, urination, stools remain normal. Appetite does reduce during summers. Check if he prefers to eat during cooler hours of the day. Check if he's overdue for deworming. Hope this is helpful.

Sir Meri colony k ek dog ko khujli ho gyi h men usko neomak dwai bhi di pr vo think nhi ho rha please meri help kijey Mai animals ko tklif Mai nhi dekh skti Sir please please please help me.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi lybrate-user, the dog should also be given anti allergic tabs, multi vitamin tabs for early recovery.
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My Labrador bitch, 14 months running, I have noticed some patches one her forehead with a hint of blood and dry rough skin, what to do?

MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
It might be some allergic dermatitis or some tick infestation, rush near by clinic for suitable tretment.
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