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Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah  - Neurologist, Mumbai

Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah

MBBS

Neurologist, Mumbai

39 Years Experience  ·  1500 at clinic
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Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah MBBS Neurologist, Mumbai
39 Years Experience  ·  1500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah
Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah is a trusted Neurologist in Mulund West, Mumbai. She has over 38 years of experience as a Neurologist. She is a qualified MBBS. You can meet Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah personally at Fortis Hospital - Mulund in Mulund West, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Pravina Ushakant Shah on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Neurologists online in Mumbai. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MBBS - Mumbai University - 1979

Location

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Fortis Hospital - Mulund

Mulund Goregaon Link Road, Mulund-WestMumbai Get Directions
  4.3  (163 ratings)
1500 at clinic
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Hello, I am a diabetic patient and most of the time I suffer from gas . From my childhood I have been suffering from migraine and cervical . I find difficulty to workout I am obese. I am totally relied on medicine . Pls help I want to loose my weight.

PGDD, RD, Bachelor of Home Science
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
Hello, I am a diabetic patient and most of the time I suffer from gas . From my childhood I have been suffering from ...
Hye, thanks for the query. Being, a diabetic it is best advised to have a diet planned as per the sugar levels, lifestyle and history. Though you can follow some guidelines - the sugar levels will fluctuate depending on what you ate or did not eat, stress levels and activity levels. You have to try and manage a balanced carb intake. Have small frequent meals. Do not fast for long hours. You have to eat 3 main and 3 mid meals. Your diet must include whole grains, seasonal fruits, vegetables, small amounts of nuts and dairy and pulses or dals or lean meats like chicken or fish and egg. Starchy vegetables need to be planned into the diet. Avoid a very heavy meal at one time. Long gaps consequent heavy meals lead to not only hyperglycemia but gas as well. Avoid fruit juices, aerated drinks or sugarcane juice, honey, jaggery or sugar. Avoid junk foods. Exercise and stay active. Avoid exercise if sugar levels are above 250 mg/dl. Do not attempt to try out too many remedies as you could go into hypoglycaemia. Sleep well. It's all a matter of discipline. I would advise you to take a personalised consultation.
4 people found this helpful
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Migraine Vs. Headache: Know the Difference

FIASP, MD, MBBS
Pain Management Specialist, Delhi
Migraine Vs. Headache: Know the Difference

Migraine vs. Headache: know the difference

How to differentiate between a migraine and headache?


When you feel pain or pressure in your head, it may become difficult for you to assess whether you are experiencing a common headache or a migraine. Let's understand how different they are from each other.

A typical headache usually affects both sides of your head and varies from a mild to moderate pain. It can last from 30 minutes to up to a period of one week.

Some specific areas which get affected by a headache are:

  •   Temples
  •   Forehead
  •   Back of your neck

Factors that trigger this headache type are a muscle strain, stress or anxiety.

A migraine, on the other hand, is also a type of a headache which results in an acute throbbing sensation in one part of your head. Usually, migraine headaches are highly painful. Migraine pain makes it difficult for a person to carry out his/her daily tasks. Symptoms or signs associated with migraine attacks are:

  •   Vomiting
  •   Nausea
  •   Sensitivity to sound or light
  •   Pain in the temples
  •   Temporary loss of vision
  •   Pain behind your ear or eye

What are the common causes of a migraine?

  •   Hormonal imbalances in women - fluctuations in oestrogen, especially during menopause or pregnancy seem to trigger a migraine
  •   Drinks like wine and extremely caffeinated beverages
  •   Foods such as salty foods, aged cheese as well as processed foods can trigger the migraine attack.
  •   Medications - vasodilators such as nitroglycerine and oral contraceptives can intensify migraine pain.

How to treat a headache?

Fortunately, you can get rid of stress-induced headaches through over-the-counter treatments, which include:

  •   Aspirin
  •   Acetaminophen
  •   Ibuprofen

How to treat a migraine?

If you experience migraine attacks less frequently, these medicines may give you quick relief:

  •   Triptans, such as rizatriptan (Maxalt) or almotriptan (Axert)
  •   Antinausea medicines, such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), promethazine (Phenergan) or prochlorperazine (Compazine)
  •   Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as acetaminophen, naproxen sodium, aspirin or ibuprofen

Some preventive tips:

  •   Make changes in your diet such as avoid such foods, including caffeine and alcohol which are believed to trigger headaches.
  •   You can also try muscle relaxation exercises, yoga or meditation to ease the migraine attack.

'consult'.

Related Tip: 8 Common Migraine Triggers You Must Stay Away From

5927 people found this helpful

I am 64 years old and suffering from restless leg syndrome for about 20 years. For last 5 years I am taking pramipexole 25 mg bid. Up to last year is was doing good but now is has very little or no effect. What should I do?

Hand Surgery, M.S. (Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Ahmedabad
Dear, I need more information to make a complete diagnosis but still you can visit my website www. Eswtindia. In and get a lot of information and we have successfully treated case like yours. Kindly go to calf cramps and get the details in faq.
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I am 39 years old male last 1 year feeling burning sensation in left foot thumb finger and between shoulders below head. Some times in sleep my half the body become numbness including right side of the head.

Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian (RD), PGDD, Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S), General Physician
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
A sleep disorder can affect your overall health, safety and quality of life. With accurate diagnosis, I can treat most sleep disorders effectively. I am a doctor and registered dietitian who will prescribe a customized diet plan and medications to help in sleep disorders. Do reply back for private consultation for a detailed treatment plan including dietary therapy.
1 person found this helpful
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I am 42 years old. I have migraine problem since last 30 years now a days I have too much problem and BP problem since last 3 years also and taking medicine of BP regularly. What should you di.

LCPS, BAM&S
Integrated Medicine Specialist, Pune
I am 42 years old. I have migraine problem since last 30 years now a days I have too much problem and BP problem sinc...
It seems your headache and blood pressure is not properly managed. You need to see a good doctor who can advise you on having a good advise on your lifestyle and some advise on managing stress and relaxation. Bearing the pain for 30 years is injustice.
1 person found this helpful
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She is have hypothyroid. What are the natural remedies to make it well. And the precautions she should take. Please reply soon. And she also has migraine problem.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine Specialist, Faridabad
She is have hypothyroid. What are the natural remedies to make it well. And the precautions she should take. Please r...
IN HYPOTHYROIDISM:--- where there is deficiency of thyroxine hormone leading to sluggishness, tired feeling, weight increase, slow heart beats, intolerance to cold, swelling of legs, feet and face, difficulty in concentrating and at times in speech. Treatment for hypothyroidism is giving thyroxine tablets. And dose are according to level of thyroid for life time. Avoid bad habits . Avoid stress. Some Relax during work. Go for walk, Take plenty of water, high-carbohydrate foods such as potatoes, rice, pasta and bread. Nutrient-rich foods that improve your health may also benefit your thyroid gland, antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables more plenty of water: Blueberries, tomatoes, bell peppers, and other foods rich in antioxidants can improve overall health and benefit the thyroid gland. Eating foods high in B vitamins, like whole grains, may also help. flax oil, Selenium: Tiny amounts of selenium are needed for enzymes that make thyroid hormones to work properly. Eating selenium-rich foods, such as sunflower seeds or Brazil nuts, can be beneficial. Tyrosine: This amino acid is used by the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4. Taking a supplement may help, avoid oily foods,junk foods, go for walk. Do Tests every 3 to 6 months. And consult doctor on time.
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Migraine - Why Early Diagnosis Is Important?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine
Neurologist, Ahmedabad
Migraine - Why Early Diagnosis Is Important?

Headaches and migraines can vary drastically depending on their duration, specific symptoms and the person they are affecting. The more you know about your specific type of headache or migraine, the better prepared you will be to treat them—and possibly even prevent them. The two types of migraine are- 

  1. Migraine without aura: The majority of migraine sufferers have Migraine without Aura. 
  2. Migraine with aura: Migraine with Aura refers to a range of neurological disturbances that occur before the headache begins, usually lasting about 20-60 minutes.

Symptoms of migraine vary and also depend on the type of migraine. A migraine has four stages: prodrome, aura, headache and postdrome. But it is not necessary that all the migraine sufferers experience all the four stages.

Prodrome: The signs of this begin to appear a day or two days before the headache starts. The signs include depression, constipation, food cravings, irritability, uncontrollable yawning, neck stiffness and hyperactivity.
Migraine Aura: Auras are a range of symptoms of the central nervous system. These might occur much before or during the migraine, but most people get a migraine without an aura. Auras usually begin gradually and increase in intensity. They last for an hour or even longer and are:

  • Visual: Seeing bright spots, various shapes, experiencing vision loss, and flashes of light
  • Sensory: Present in the form of touch sensations like feeling of pins and needles in the arms and legs
  • Motor: Usually related with the movement problems like the limb weakness
  • Verbal: It is related with the speech problems

Headache: In case of a migraine attack one might experience:

  • Pain on both sides or one side of the head
  • Pain is throbbing in nature
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Sensitivity to smells, sound and light
  • Vision is blurred
  • Fainting and lightheadedness

Postdrome: This is the final phase of the migraine. During this phase one might feel fatigued, though some people feel euphoric.

Red flags that the patient may be having underlying serious disorder not migraine

  1. Onset of headaches >50 years 
  2. Thunderclap headache - subarachnoid haemorrhage 
  3. Neurological symptoms or signs 
  4. Meningism 
  5. Immunosuppression or malignancy 
  6. Red eye and haloes around lights - acute angle closure glaucoma 
  7. Worsening symptoms 
  8. Symptoms of temporal arteritis

These patients require CT scan / MRI or CSF examination. Most Migraine patients do not need these tests. 

Diagnosis of Migraine: Usually migraines go undiagnosed and thus are untreated. In case you experience the symptoms regularly then talk to the doctor, who evaluates the symptoms and can start a treatment. You can also be referred to a neurologist who is trained to treat the migraines and other conditions. During the appointment the neurologist usually asks about the family history of headaches and migraines along with your symptoms and medical history.

The doctor might advise for some tests like:

  1. Blood Tests: These reveal problems with the blood vessel like an infection in the spinal cord and brain.
  2. CT scan: Used to diagnose the infections, tumors, brain damage, and bleeding that cause the migraines.
  3. MRI: This helps to diagnose the tumors bleeding infections, neurological conditions, and strokes.
  4. Lumbar Puncture: For analyzing infections and neurological damages. In lumbar puncture a thin needle is inserted between the two vertebrae to remove a sample of the cerebrospinal fluid for analysis.

Treatments

Migraine treatments can help stop symptoms and prevent future attacks.

Many medications have been designed to treat migraines. Some drugs often used to treat other conditions also may help relieve or prevent migraines. Medications used to combat migraines fall into two broad categories:

  • Pain-relieving medications. Also known as acute or abortive treatment, these types of drugs are taken during migraine attacks and are designed to stop symptoms.
  • Preventive medications. These types of drugs are taken regularly, often on a daily basis, to reduce the severity or frequency of migraines.

Your treatment strategy depends on the frequency and severity of your headaches, the degree of disability your headaches cause, and your other medical conditions.

Some medications aren't recommended if you're pregnant or breast-feeding. Some medications aren't given to children. Your doctor can help find the right medication for you.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3025 people found this helpful

I have back pain for past two years, also having numbness in my legs, please suggest

Dip. SICOT (Belgium), MNAMS, DNB (Orthopedics), MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
Hi thanks for your query and welcome to lybrate. I am Dr. Akshay from fortis hospital, new delhi. You should not be having persistent back pain, please elaborate your problem in detail as to whether there is any pain radiating down in legs and any other symptoms like numbness, paraesthesia, weakness in legs etc do you feel fever, weight loss, loss of apetite etc if you have localized back pain, you can start with - to maintain proper posture while working and sleeping - if pain is more then you can take a short course of an anti-inflammatory medication which suits you - physical therapy initially under supervision of a trained physiotherapist and then to continue at home - adequate calcium & vitamin d intake if levels are low in body - ice packs can applied if your pain is acute, then hot fomentation can be done at home - analgesic spray for local application can be used and is easily available. Get back to me in case your symptoms do not get better in 2-3 weeks time. Actually I will advise for dynamic x rays of your back if you are not improving with conservative management after 2-3 weeks time. Do not hesitate to contact me if you need any further assistance.
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M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition, DNHE, P.G. Diploma in Panchkarma, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Hapur
Can't Sleep???
Natural home remedies for Insomnia

Insomnia can become a real nightmare as the clock ticks on into the night and you ’re awake to notice. Try these natural approaches to help you get some rest

Before- bed bites

• Have a slice of turkey or chicken , or a banana before heading to bed . These foods contain tryptophan , an amino acid that ’s used to make serotonin . And serotonin is a brain chemical that helps you sleep .
• Carbohydrates help trytophan enter the brain. Try a glass of warm milk (milk contains tryptophan ) and a cookie , or warm milk with a spoonful of honey .
• Avoid big meals late in the evening. You need three to four hours to digest a big meal.
• Spicy or sugary food, even at suppertime , is usually a bad idea. Spices can irritate your stomach , and when it tosses and turns, so will you . Having a lot of sugary food—especially chocolate, which contains caffeine— can make you feel jumpy .

Call on herbs for help

• Valerian helps people fall asleep faster without the “ hangover ” affect of some sleeping pills. It binds to the same receptors in the brain that tranquilizers such as diazepam bind to . Take two capsules of valerian root an hour before bed .
• Take 4 , 000 to 8, 000 milligrams of dried passionflower capsules . Passionflower is widely used as a mild herbal sedative .

Smell your way to sleep

• Lavender has a reputation as a mild tranquilizer . Simply dab a bit of the oil onto your temples and forehead before you hit the pillow . The aroma should help send you off to sleep .
• Put a drop of jasmine essential oil on each wrist just before you go to bed . In studies conducted at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia, researchers discovered that
people who spent the night in jasmine -scented rooms slept more peacefully than people who stayed in unscented—or even lavender-scented— rooms .
• Try a soothing aromatic bath before bedtime. Add 5 drops lavender oil and 3 drops ylang- ylang oil to warm bathwater and enjoy a nice soak .

Be a slave to schedule

• Wake up at the same time each day, no matter how little sleep you got the night before. On weekends, follow the same schedule, so your body adheres to the same pattern all week long . You ’ll fall asleep faster.
• Every morning , go for a walk . It doesn ’t have to be a long walk, but it should definitely be outdoors. The presence of natural light (even if the day is overcast ) tells your groggy body it’ s time to wake up for the day. With your body clock set by the great outdoors, you ’ll sleep better at night .
• Try not to nap during the day, no matter how tired you feel. People who don’ t have insomnia often benefit from a short afternoon nap. However , if you ’ re napping in daytime only to turn into a wide -eyed zombie at night , there’ s a good chance that that afternoon snooze is disrupting your body clock.

Pillow tricks

• Once you get into bed , imagine your feet becoming heavy and numb . Feel them sinking into the mattress . Then do the same with your calves, and slowly work your way up your body, letting it all grow heavy and relaxed . The idea is to let yourself go, in gradual phases .
• If you’ re still awake after this progressive relaxation exercise, count sheep . The point is to occupy your mind with boring repetition , and , not to cast aspersions on sheep , there’ s nothing more boring or repetitive than counting a herd of them . Any repetitive counting activity will lull you .
• If you just can’t sleep , don’ t lie in bed worrying about it. That will only make sleep harder to attain. Get up, leave the bedroom , and grab a book or watch TV .

Prep your bedroom

• Turn your alarm clock so that you can’t see it from bed . If you ’ re glancing at the clock when you wake up— and it’s almost impossible not to —you ’ ll soon start wondering how you can function tomorrow on so little sleep tonight .
• Turn your thermostat down a few degrees before heading to bed . Most people sleep better when their surroundings are cool .
• If you share your bed , consider buying a queen - or king- size mattress so you don ’t keep one another up. Or consider sleeping in separate beds . ( Be sure to emphasize that your wish for separate beds is based on pragmatism rather than preference . )

Check the label

• Be cautious about taking an over - the -counter painkiller before bed . Some of them, like Excedrin , contain caffeine . Read the label first.
• Check labels of decongestants and cold remedies too. In addition to caffeine, they may contain ingredients , such as pseudoephedrine, that rev up your nervous system and leave you unable to fall asleep.

More " don ’ ts" for better dozing

• Avoid exercising within four hours of bedtime— it’s too stimulating. Instead , exercise in the morning or after work . An exception is yoga . A number of yoga postures are designed to calm your body and prepare you for sleep.
• Avoid caffeinated beverages, particularly within four hours of bedtime. Though people have varying ranges of sensitivity to caffeine, the stimulating effects can be long - lasting .
• Also avoid alcohol in the evenings. While a glass of sherry might help you fall asleep a bit faster than usual, the effects soon wear off , and you’ re more likely to wake up during the night .
• If you smoke within four hours of your bedtime, look no further for the cause of your insomnia . Nicotine stimulates the central nervous system, interfering with your ability to fall asleep and stay that way .
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