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Dr. Parul Parpani

Veterinarian, Mumbai

Dr. Parul Parpani Veterinarian, Mumbai
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Parul Parpani
Dr. Parul Parpani is a popular Veterinarian in Powai, Mumbai. She is currently practising at Dr. Parul Parpani in Powai, Mumbai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Parul Parpani on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 42 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dr. Parul Parpani

Shop No 3,Panchvati Building, Powai Landmark: Near S M Shetty School,Near Hiranandani GardenMumbai Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

14-year old Lab with a huge boil on its left hind leg. Since we live in a hill station, far away from a vet, request advice. Thanks

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please rule out cancerous growth with your vet and biopsy . and if it is so never operate as he is of 14 years we can't do much leave it as along as it is . or consult your vet
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Pets become overweight for very simple reason. they eat more calories than what they can spend. Owners are responsible to ensure and regulate proper calorie intake and expenditure.
Factors contributing to obesity are-
Food type: Feeding carb rich and excessive fatty food has cumulative effect leading to obesity.
Neutering - calorie requirements reduce post neutering as the metabolic rate lowers. controlled intake and regular activity helps to keep obesity at bay.
Diseases - Hypothyroidism, Cushing's Disease (excess intrinsic steroids), diabetes etc

Adverse effects of obesity:
Early onset of osteoarthritis/joint disease
Breathing difficulty in short snouted breeds like pugs
Heart disease/high blood pressure
Pancreatitis/hepatitis in cats

Obesity in Pets is completely preventable disease. Cost of managing a obese pet can be financially as well as emotionally taxing. Its always better to prevent than cure!!!!
13 people found this helpful

Doctor can you help me with my black female lab who is 6 month old. I feel that she has some problem with her coat as I find her hairs more often on clothes and bed. Though her coat looks to be fine, shiny and hairy yet this hair loss concerns me. Is it fine or any sort of symptom? And also how to help with her unclean ears?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Dogs do shed seasonally. The shedding is more in growing puppies. Its suggested that you comb your pet's fur at least once daily - preferably in the morning- to remove all dead/loose fur. This way you can reduce chances of finding fur on bed n cloths. Check if she's overdue for deworming, which can also contribute to stress and excess shedding. Check on diet, if it has balanced nutrients, especially good quality proteins. You can safely incorporate oral omega 3/6/9 supplement so as to control loss of fur. Hope this is helpful:)
7 people found this helpful

My pup is 1 year old. let me know the vaccination schedule for him. He is a pug . Also let me know deworming schedule too.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
What we are doing in kolkata -- fecal sample examination routinely to get an idea about the worms present within body/ intestine and selection of dewormers inaccordance with. For vaccination, it's best to have a prior health check up for fitness and high end immune status so that after innoculation antibody could be produced at desired level. Schedule we are following at par indian standard, a qualified vet will guide you as per your pet's requirement, individual dog differs with its schedule. Rabies, an endemic disease in india at different parts, needs no excuse to execute while planning for immunization against it. Consult further with your dog's previous records of immunizations and deworming. Thanks.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello. I have a pet dog 9 years old. Kindly suggest what should we give him to eat and what not?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
Normal routine diet is recommended as the dog is feeling well you can ho for branded feeds or for home made ration as which you eat with some minor exceptions thing which are not to be fed to dogs like chocolate whitebread.
5 people found this helpful
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My Dog is not eating. Her mouth has a terrible foul smell and has developed red rashes between her hind legs and under the tail. She has even become very aggressive and grumpy, and would not let anyone try to get her active.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
How old is your pet? the foul smell could be from the dental disease. Kindly get her oral cavity evaluated for any dental disease/loose tooth/tarter/tooth root abscess etc. From a qualified Vet. These explorations are done generally under sedation. Take care.
2 people found this helpful

I have gsd cross breed female dog and she is 6 years old. 10 days back she had been coughing now and then. Now she is not coughing I gave medicine. But till today she is not taking food she use to drink only water.(she was not taking her food for th past 4 days). Please suggest me any medicine for her.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Wise to check if she has any infection and fever. Coughing could be initial sign which could have subsided, but infection could have prevailed. Share more info about her meds. Would recommend a blood test. Take care.
3 people found this helpful

Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bangalore
Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

Many animals receive “kennel cough” vaccines that include bordetella and cpi and cav-2 every 6 to 9 months without evidence that this frequency of vaccination is necessary or beneficial. In contrast, other dogs are never vaccinated for kennel cough and diseases are not seen. Cpi immunity lasts at least 3 years when given intranasally and cav -2 immunity lasts a minimum of 7 years parenterally for cav-i. These two virus in combination with bordetella bronchiseptica are the agents, which are often associated with kennel cough, however, other factors play an important role in diseases (eg. Stress, dust, humidity, molds, mycoplasma, etc.).

Thus, kennel cough is not a vaccine preventable disease because of the complex factors associated with this disease. Furthermore, this is often a mild to moderate self limiting disease. It's just like common cold in humans. A course of antibiotics usually is enough to treat the condition. I generally do not recommend kennel cough vaccines unless dogs are staying in a boarding facility that requires them.

2 people found this helpful

What should be the temperature range in which kitten live? When at what age will they do not need mother's milk? What will mother do if we give her kitten to new owner?

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Most conformable temp is 25 degree centigrade. Ideally mother milk is needed upto4 to 6 week of age. Agter age of 20 to 22 days semisolids food can be introduced.
1 person found this helpful
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My one year old German shepherd is not eating food and has become very lazy. He has pain in his hind legs from quite sometime and he never lets us touch his hind legs. Today we have given him 250mg Crocin. What else can be done please . Suggest.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Plz check the paws of the back legs. Thr can b a boil or a wound causing pain or hip joint complications. If you do not find any wound or swelling between the paws then ill suggest you get a hip joint xray done soon instead of blindly giving crocin which may mask the intensity of the pain n diagnosis.
1 person found this helpful
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Hi, I have a six year old yellow labrador. Her underbelly is turning black and the discoloration has reached up to her neck. What could be the reason? also she has developed bad breath recently!

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
She had skin problem. Kindly share some pic. So that I can guide you. Blackening of skin mainly because of chronic infection.
4 people found this helpful
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My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful

My pet dog scooby,12 years old,eats well ,passes normal stools.But always sleeping.Not active as before.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Age might be a problem , still need to rule out systemic diseases and cardiac function. Try liver supplement with your vets advice.
2 people found this helpful
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

My dog snoop is very sick I think. His eyes are red. Always red. He is fine in the morning but after 4.20 he acts crazy. I don't know what to do.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
It might be seems some allergies which normally cause eyes red. You can use any antiallergic drug like cetirizine. You should share some pic. Of your pet before you should start using any drug?
2 people found this helpful
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My dog is vomiting water like liquid little foamy with tiny bits of blood, it happened twice, one 5 days back in the morning around 4am, then at 2am. During vomiting he collapsed and paralyzed without any movement. Both time he woke up after 5 mins and he was active. I gave him Ranitac and vomited (half). Please help me, I am scared, he is 12 yrs old. 6 months back he had UTI. He is being given Nefrotec DS 2 tabs a day from 6 months as Advised by Vet. Please Please Help me, save my boy.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Your dog has chronic kidney problem and for that your vet has prescribed nefrotec ds2 tablets daily one since six months, which controls kidney damage, so continue further. You should not give him heavy food containing high fat & protein. Light diet like gruel of ragi, rice, wheat, rave should be given, with butter milk, soya milk also. Fruit juices, give perinorm injection which also controls vomition & then give ranitec orally 8 hourly. Give liver tonics like liv 52, or livobex orally 10 ml twice a day, imferon inj or its capsules with folic acid will help to build blood in the body. Sgot & sgpt & esr tests to be made to know the health condition of your dog. You should keep daily observation and make note of it. If vomition does not stop, take him to veterinary hospitals for iv fluids & further treatment for vomition.
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C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
What does humanizing your dog mean?

Talking to your dog like he/she is a person.
Treating your dog like he/she is a person.
Allowing dogs to do what they want because it will hurt their "feelings"
Dressing them up in little doggie clothes.
Remember, humanizing your dog is fulfilling your own human needs, not your dogs. Humanizing dogs does more harm than good.
9 people found this helpful
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Five Common Summer Hazards for Dogs

1. Dehydration
One of the best ways to keep your dog safe in the summer time is by providing lots of cool, clean, fresh water. Consider preparing low sodium chicken broth or yogurt ice cubes, and introducing canned dog foods (best when frozen in a Kong!) to increase the moisture content in your dog’s diet.

2. Burned Pads
Under the summer sun, asphalt on sidewalks and streets can heat to a temperature that can burn a dog’s paws. To avoid scorched paws, walk your dog very early in the morning or in the late evening when the streets have cooled off. If you must walk your dog during the day, dog booties can protect his feet. Always put your hand down on the asphalt for about thirty seconds – if you must pull your hand away because the street is too hot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on without hurting his paws. If you don’t want your hand on the street for thirty seconds, your dog probably does not want his paws on it for thirty or more minutes of walking.

3. Parasites
Summer is the season for fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes; pests which can present a minor discomfort to your dog at best and at worst may be life threatening or cause self-mutilating behaviors. Feeding your dog a high quality diet, without preservatives or chemicals will build his immune system, making him generally more resistant to parasite infestation. There are a wide variety of preventatives on the market, including chemical spot-on treatments, repellent shampoos, essential oils, and flea/tick collars; talk to your vet to see what she recommends for your dog. Cleaning your house frequently and keeping your dog well groomed will also reduce the risk of parasite infestation.

4. Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a serious risk to dog’s health – in worst case scenarios, it can be fatal. You can prevent heat stroke by restricting your pet’s exercise during the hottest hours of the day (early morning or late evening are the best times for exercise during the summer), by making sure he is well hydrated, providing cool places for him to relax, providing opportunities to swim, cooling mats, and by never leaving your dog unattended in the car during summer heat.

Many dogs die annually in hot cars. Even if your windows are cracked or you park in the shade, heat can build quickly in a car in the summer, turning it into an oven. If it’s 95 degrees at noon and you leave your windows cracked, the temperature in your car may still rise as high as 113 degrees. This is a recipe for disaster for your dog. If you must leave your dog in the car for any period of time, the air conditioning should stay on. Leaving a dog to die in a hot car is not just a health risk for your dog, but may be cause for animal cruelty charges in some area. The solution? Don’t leave your dog in a hot car.

5. Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is contracted through bodily fluids or tissue and can be transmitted through direct (as in the case of a bite or ingestion of flesh) or indirect contact (through water sources, food, etc.) with an infected animal. Stagnant waters are a common source of leptospirosis bacteria. Lepto can cause permanent health problems or death if not treated quickly. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, trembling/shaking, lethargy, anorexia, tenderness of joints and muscles, and increased water intake. If you suspect your dog has lepto, get him to a vet right away, an emergency vet if need be.

There are vaccines for lepto but they do not prevent all strains and can cause significant adverse reactions. Talk to your vet about weighing the risk of infection with the risks associated with the lepto vaccine.
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