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Dr. Makarand Chousalkar

Veterinarian, Mumbai

Dr. Makarand Chousalkar Veterinarian, Mumbai
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Makarand Chousalkar
Dr. Makarand Chousalkar is a popular Veterinarian in Andheri West, Mumbai. He is currently associated with Top Dog Pets Clinic in Andheri West, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Makarand Chousalkar on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Shop No.2, Vishal Nagar, Opp. Stomach-II Restaurant J.P.Road,7 Bungalows, Andheri West, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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I had got a fallen squirrel baby so what should I feed him and how to keep him warm ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use a carton box with 60 watts buld ata distance of 1.5 feet above the baby so that the box get heated and in frequent interval switch off and on it and feed him with cerlac in semi diluted state with syringe.
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Hi, I have a six year old yellow labrador. Her underbelly is turning black and the discoloration has reached up to her neck. What could be the reason? also she has developed bad breath recently!

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
She had skin problem. Kindly share some pic. So that I can guide you. Blackening of skin mainly because of chronic infection.
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Hello Sir, My 50 days old female Lab is not eating anything, but britannia marie biscuits. And she is also not growing. I have started puppy starter, but somebody asked me to stop it, as it can harm her stomach. What to do?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Hello Sir, My 50 days old female Lab is not eating anything, but britannia marie biscuits. And she is also not growin...
It is better to put yiour dog on puppy starter which is more beneficial so do not listen to lay persons advice put her on dog food only and lots of fresh clean potable water.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds


Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

10. Tosa Inu
Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

9. Pit Bulls
Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

8. Perro de Presa Canario
Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

7. Neapolitan Mastiff
Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

6. Fila Brasileiro
Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

5. Dogo Argentino
These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

3. Boerboel
Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

2. American Bulldog
American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

1. American Bandogge
These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
3 people found this helpful

Sir I have3 year old gsd nd she got crossed with Street dog nd I don't want her to conceive but next day I had already arranged for a matting so now what should I do. After the drug injection should I go for matting option the very next day.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
If she has mated with stray dog than there is no point in going matin with other dog. Now only option is get treatment for mismating an waiting for next heat. Remember: the hormonal treatment for mismating can be associated with side effects.
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My dog, Jay, is a German Shepherd and he is three months old. He is skinny and he weighs nearly 8.5 kg. Is this the appropriate weight or should he be weighing more? if so what should be done?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
You can try gemon food from itally a premium food with 31 percent protien and 21 percent fat and 4300 k cal / kg of food you get when digested and the 20 kg cost you only 6500 very cheap and good in results.
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What shampoo should i use for dog ?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian,
You should use only dog shampoo. Human shampoo are not indicated for dogs because of different skin.
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Hello how are you doctor I want to ask you about my dog labrador hes 2 years old He did not crossed any bitch yet is this mandatory to cross him?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
No it is not. For males if you do not desire babies then please get his balls removed to avoid prostate cancers in his advanced ages.
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I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
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My one year old German shepherd is not eating food and has become very lazy. He has pain in his hind legs from quite sometime and he never lets us touch his hind legs. Today we have given him 250mg Crocin. What else can be done please . Suggest.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Plz check the paws of the back legs. Thr can b a boil or a wound causing pain or hip joint complications. If you do not find any wound or swelling between the paws then ill suggest you get a hip joint xray done soon instead of blindly giving crocin which may mask the intensity of the pain n diagnosis.
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Ear of my german shepherd is not standing. What should I do?

MVSc
Veterinarian,
Ear standing in gsd depending on cartiage in ear if he is for more than 4 months we can do cropping operation
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My pup is 1 year old. let me know the vaccination schedule for him. He is a pug . Also let me know deworming schedule too.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
What we are doing in kolkata -- fecal sample examination routinely to get an idea about the worms present within body/ intestine and selection of dewormers inaccordance with. For vaccination, it's best to have a prior health check up for fitness and high end immune status so that after innoculation antibody could be produced at desired level. Schedule we are following at par indian standard, a qualified vet will guide you as per your pet's requirement, individual dog differs with its schedule. Rabies, an endemic disease in india at different parts, needs no excuse to execute while planning for immunization against it. Consult further with your dog's previous records of immunizations and deworming. Thanks.
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My dog is not eating very well, She is very active though? Wanted to know the reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As far as she is active there is no problem , her appetite is of very low level , can give liver supplements to improve their diet patterns . Please consult your vet
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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Sir i have a gsd of 1 year & 1 month old. She is not taking her normal or pet food for last 20days. What is the prob and should i do for it? Now she is becoming weak day by day. Please suggest.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
In appetance may be cause of chronic diseases . Please consult a vet as soon as possible please do the blood profile also.
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How can the tumour growing in the Mammary gland of my dog be cured without operation?pls help, as she is 12 yrs old.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As she is 12 years of age, please dont do any surgery and try to maintain it with tablets and let it have happy life and favourite food.
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My dog she is 4 year n she is a cross breed of papmareian and street dog she often bites us imspite of being oowner is it normal? And she stays in period for nearly for more than two months and sometimes she get mergi attack where her mouth get stick and she get unconscious couldn't even walk properly

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Pomerian are by nature are aggressive esp. Crossbreed. According to symptoms ur pet is suffering from Epilepsy. She required right treatment for that. U should get good veterinary help. For now u can give Gardenal 30 mg BID 1 week
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My dog is labby he is 11 year old he is not eating since 2 weeks and vomiting white foam. He has high urea in his blood test he is getting lethargic and not responding we are worried what to do? please help.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As per your statement its might be the kidney failure so he has to be under medical supervision please contact you are vet.
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Hi , i have a dog age 5 Yrs .Lab . His hair shedding alot and its almost gone near genitalia .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please consult a vet it might because of skin infection or else send me photos so could suggest first aid . Still consulting a vet near by is appreciable.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
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