Lybrate Mini logo
Lybrate for
Android icon App store icon
Ask FREE Question Ask FREE Question to Health Experts
Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Dr. K. S. Bava

Pediatrician, Mumbai

400 at clinic
Dr. K. S. Bava Pediatrician, Mumbai
400 at clinic
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. K. S. Bava
Dr. K. S. Bava is a trusted Pediatrician in Bhandup West, Mumbai. He is currently practising at Madhu Polyclinic & Nursing Home in Bhandup West, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. K. S. Bava on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 40 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment

Mini Apartment, Jungal Mangal Road, Bhandup West. Landmark: pposite Sarvodaya Nagar, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
400 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments
7 days validity
Consult Now

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. K. S. Bava

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

10 IMPORTANT KEYS FOR SUCCESS IN EXAMS

Hypnotherapist, DCS, BSIC, Advanced Trainee of Transactional Analysis, Advanced Skills in Counselling
Psychologist,

10 IMPORTANT KEYS FOR SUCCESS IN EXAMS

The key to becoming a successful student is learning how to study smarter, not harder. This becomes more and more true as you advance in your education. An hour or two of studying a day is usually sufficient to make it through high school with satisfactory grades, but when college arrives, there aren't enough hours in the day to get all your studying in if you don't know how to study smarter.

While some students are able to breeze through school with minimal effort, this is the exception. The vast majority of successful students achieve their success by developing and applying effective study habits. The following are the top 10 study habits employed by highly successful students. So if you want to become a succesful student, don't get discouraged, don't give up, just work to develop each of the study habits below and you'll see your grades go up, your knowledge increase, and your ability to learn and assimilate information improve.

1. Don't attempt to cram all your studying into one session.
Ever find yourself up late at night spending more energy trying to keep your eyelids open than you are studying? if so, it's time for a change. Successful students typically space their work out over shorter periods of time and rarely try to cram all of their studying into just one or two sessions. If you want to become a successful student then you need to learn to be consistent in your studies and to have regular, yet shorter, study periods.

2. Plan when you're going to study.
Successful students schedule specific times throughout the week when they are going to study -- and then they stick with their schedule. Students who study inconsistently usually do not perform as well as students who have a set study schedule. Even if you're all caught up with your studies, creating a weekly routine, where you set aside a period of time a few days a week, to review your courses will ensure you develop habits that will enable you to succeed in your education long term.

3. Study at the same time.
Not only is it important that you plan when you're going to study, it's important you create a consistent, daily study routine. When you study at the same time each day and each week, you're studying will become a regular part of your life. You'll be mentally and emotionally more prepared for each study session and each study session will become more productive. If you have to change your schedule from time to time due to unexpected events, that's okay, but get back on your routine as soon as the event has passed.

4. Each study time should have a specific goal.
Simply studying without direction is not effective. You need to know exactly what you need to accomplish during each study session. Before you start studying, set a study session goal that supports your overall academic goal (i. E. Memorize 30 vocabulary words in order to ace the vocabulary section on an upcoming language test.)

5. Never procrasitinate your planned study session.
It's very easy, and common, to put off your study session because of lack of interest in the subject, because you have other things you need to get done, or just because the assignment is hard. Successful students do not procrastinate studying. If you procrastinate your study session, your studying will become much less effective and you may not get everything accomplished that you need to. Procrastination also leads to rushing, and rushing is the number one cause of errors.

6. Start with the most difficult subject first.
As your most diffult assignment or subject will require the most effort and mental energy, you should start with it first. Once you've completed the most difficult work, it will be much easier to complete the rest of your work. Believe it or not, starting with the most difficult subject will greatly improve the effectiveness of your study sessions, and your academic performance.

7. Always review your notes before starting an assigment.
Obviously, before you can review your notes you must first have notes to review. Always make sure to take good notes in class. Before you start each study session, and before you start a particular assignment, review your notes thoroughly to make sure you know how to complete the assignment correctly. Reviewing your notes before each study session will help you remember important subject matter learned during the day, and make sure studying targeted and effective.

8. Make sure you're not distracted whiles you're studying.
Everyone gets distracted by something. Maybe it's the tv. Or your family. Or maybe it's too quiet. Some people actually study better with a little background noise. When you're distracted while you're studying you (1) loose your train of thought and (2) you're unable to focus -- both of which will lead to very ineffective studying. Before you start studying find a place where you won't be disturbed or distracted. Some students like the library where it is quiet and books around you to help focus. 

9. Use study groups effectively.
Ever heard the phrase" two heads are better than one? well this can be especially true when it comes to studying. Working in groups enables you to (1) get help from others when you're struggling to understand a concept, (2) complete assignments more quickly, and (3) teach others whereby helping both the other students and yourselve to internalize the subject matter. However, study groups can become very ineffective if they're not structured and if groups members come unprepared. Effective students use study groups effectively.

10. Review your notes, schoolwork and other class materials over the weekend.
Successful students review what they've learned during the week over the weekend. This way they're well prepared to continue learning new concepts that build upon previous coursework and knowledge acquired the previous week.

13 people found this helpful

My son 15 month s has loss appetite and runny nose, with a slight diarrhea, he's not taking milk, rice, etc. I noticed that his molar tooth upper is coming out, can it be because of this ? he had a fever for 2 days but now normal, it's been 4 days now altogether.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Bangalore
Yes, fever, blocked or running nose, teething and any infection can cause reduced appetite. It will pass.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My son is 5 years old. His health is normal, height is good. But in the time of season change he is suffering from cough, a lot of is product in his lungs. Some times his cough is mucolite or asthma type. I am also suffering from asthma, this is genetic. Another thing his skin glaze is not good. So, sir what can we do for him to remedies.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath, Patna
Hello, Lybrate user, •He should drink lukewarm water. •Gargle, twice with hot saline water. •Tk, steam, twice. •Avoid, cold intake, exposure to cold climate, dust, smoke, junk food ,nicotine.•tk, homoeopathic medicine: @ Bryonia alb. 30-6 pills, thrice. •Report wkly, your feedback matters for further follow up,  please. Tk,  care.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello, my 1 year old baby is going to pooh 7-8 times a day, doctor prescribed Colistop-DS tonic and Norflox tablet, but my baby is vomiting in 10 mins after taking medicine, don't know how to give medicine to him please help me I am so much worried.

DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Hello, my 1 year old baby is going to pooh 7-8 times a day, doctor prescribed Colistop-DS tonic and Norflox tablet, b...
Good morning. For a 1 year old weighing 10 kg poohing 7-8 times a day is normal unless if he has behavioural changes, very watery loose motions, dehydration signs, not passing urine less frequently, bloody stools, foul smelling stools, decreased intake of food. Hence if these signs are present in your kid then only go for medicational treatment or else its better to not use antibiotics unnecessarily which seems irrational. Thank you, have a nice day.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My child of 2 years not taking food. I am feeding her she is becoming thin.My doubt is whether my feeding is not sufficient or all are telling in the grown up stage children will become thin

MBBS, DNB (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Kolkata
First of all stop blaming yourself. 10 kg at 2 year is low but not so bad to be able to fully comment please send me her height and weight record( if not specifically recorded, search all doctor's prescription you have ever visited. ) Tell what is her diet?
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
An 8-12 months old baby should be made to eat diced fruits, cooked and green vegetables, yoghurt, potatoes, cereal and eggs, since they are all healthy foods rich in various vitamins and minerals.
You found this helpful

My baby is 7 months old. He fell off from bed 5 days ago and from then he is not shouting that much he does before. What is the reason for that and what to do for that?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Jaipur
My baby is 7 months old. He fell off from bed 5 days ago and from then he is not shouting that much he does before. W...
If he is conscious,eating well,playing active, no need to be panicky. Concussion head injury may cause temporary altered sensorium.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My child 2 year 10 month. stomach pain 3 month. N. B. T. Test-04 %polymorphs are nbt positive (upto10)

MD - Paediatrics
Pediatrician, Ranchi
Hello thanks for the query nbt (nitroblue tetrazoleum test) is done to see immunodeficiency. It comes positive in chronic granulomatous disease. In this condition there are repeated episodes of boils, abscess, pneumonia etc. Please tell me in detail for which condition it was advised as it is not done as a routine investigation, so that I better able to help you out. Regards.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

12 Signs Your Child Is Not Eating Properly!

M.Ch - Paediatric Surgery, MNAMS (Membership of the National Academy) (General Surgery) , DNB (General Surgery), MBBS
Pediatrician, Pune
12 Signs Your Child Is Not Eating Properly!

Spitting up, refusing to try new foods and occasionally turning up their noses at feeding times, is normal but consistently refusing food and water, vomiting and allergies may indicate an underlying medical condition that requires attention. Common feeding problems that affect infants include sucking, prolonged chewing without swallowing, holding food in their mouth and grabbing food. Infants who are unable to close their mouths in order to keep food inside may also be said to be suffering from feeding problems.

Feeding problems could be triggered by medical conditions like a cleft palate, premature birth, respiratory problems, low birth weight etc. or by non-medical reasons such as the child’s feeling of being unloved or stressed. Symptoms of feeding problems vary from infant to infant. However, some of the common symptoms exhibited are:

  • Problems with chewing

  • Excessive drooling

  • Refusing to eat foods or drink liquids

  • Long feeding times

  • Coughing or gagging while feeding

  • Difficulty with breast or bottle feeding

  • Nasal stuffiness while eating

  • Poor weight gain

  • Recurring respiratory infections

  • Vomiting or excessive spitting up of food

  • Arching the back while feeding

  • Disinterest in feeding

Though feeding problems are minor in most cases, it is important to consult a doctor if this behaviour continues over a period of time. This is because the child may be suffering from an underlying medical condition or could be at an increased risk of suffering from dehydration, aspiration and lung problems. It could also lead to delayed physical and mental development, speech problems and cognitive issues.

Feeding problems are addressed in many different ways. The first step to dealing with feeding problems is to change the texture and temperature of food being given to the baby. In addition, try changing the posture of the baby while feeding.

In some cases, mouth exercises may be needed to strengthen the mouth muscles. Chewing exercises and tongue movement may also help reduce feeding problems.

Encourage your infant to try different types of food by including different textures in their daily meals. Alternating food textures and liquids can make it easier for the infant to swallow the food. Do not force your child to eat in a hurry but let him or her take their own time.

In cases where the infant is not gaining weight, the doctor may suggest nutritional changes and a specific diet to help gain weight. In emergency cases, hospitalisation may also be required and your baby may be given a feeding tube to ensure he or she receives adequate nutrition.

4049 people found this helpful

Fever in Children And Home Remedies

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Gondiya
Fever in Children And Home Remedies

Fever remains the most common concern prompting parents to present their child to the emergency department. Fever has traditionally been defined as a rectal temperature over 100.4 F or 38 C. Temperatures measured at other body sites are usually lower. The threshold for defining a fever does vary significantly among different individuals, since body temperatures can vary by as much as 1 F. Low-grade fevers are usually considered less than 102.2 F (39 C).

Fever itself is not life-threatening unless it is extremely and persistently high, such as greater than 107 F (41.6 C) when measured rectally. Risk factors for worrisome fevers include age under 2 years (infants and toddlers) or recurrent fevers lasting more than one week. Fever may indicate the presence of a serious illness, but usually a fever is caused by a common infection, most of which are not serious. The part of the brain called the hypothalamus controls body temperature. The hypothalamus increases the body's temperature as a way to fight the infection. However, many conditions other than infections may cause a fever.

Fever in Children - Causes:

Causes of fever include:

When to seek medical care:

  • The child is younger than 6 months of age (regardless of prematurity).
  • One is unable to control the fever.
  • One suspects a child may become dehydrated from vomitingdiarrhea, or not drinking (for example, the child has sunken eyes, dry diapers, tented skin, cannot be roused, etc.).
  • The child has been to a doctor but is now getting worse or new symptoms or signs have developed.

Although you may have done your best to care for your child, sometimes it is smart to take your child to the emergency department. The child's doctor may meet you there, or the child may be evaluated and treated by the emergency doctor.

Take a child to an emergency clinic when any of the following happen:

  • One has serious concerns and is unable to contact the child's doctor.
  • One suspects the child is dehydrated.
  • seizure occurs.
  • The child has a purple or red rash.
  • A change in consciousness occurs.
  • The child's breathing is shallow, rapid, or difficult.
  • The child is younger than 2 months of age.
  • The child has a headache that will not go away.
  • The child continues to vomit.
  • The child has complex medical problems or takes prescription medications on a chronic basis (for example, medications prescribed for more than two weeks' duration)

Home Remedies for Fever in Children:

The three goals of home care for a child with fever are to control the temperature, prevent dehydration, and monitor for serious or life-threatening illness.

  • The first goal is to make the child comfortable by reducing the fever below 102 F (38.9 C) with medications and appropriately dressing the child. A warm water bath can also be helpful .
    • To check a child's temperature, one will need a thermometer. Different types of thermometers are available, including glass, mercury, digital, and tympanic (used in the ear).
      • Glass thermometers work well but may break, and they take several minutes to get a reading.
      • Digital thermometers are inexpensive and obtain a reading in seconds.
    • Oral temperatures may be obtained in older children who are not mouth breathing or have not recently consumed a hot or cold beverage.
    • Monitoring and documenting the fever pattern is achieved using a thermometer and a handmade chart.
    • Acetaminophen  and ibuprofen  are used to reduce fever.
      • Follow the dosage and frequency instructions printed on the label.
      • Remember to continue to give the medication over at least 24 hours or the fever will usually return.
    • Children should not be overdressed indoors, even in the winter.
      • Overdressing keeps the body from cooling by evaporation, radiation, conduction, or convection.
      • The most practical solution is to dress the child in a single layer of clothing, then cover the child with a sheet or light blanket.
    • A sponge bath in warm water will help reduce a fever.
      • Such a bath is usually not needed but may more quickly reduce the fever.
      • Put the child in a few inches of warm water, and use a sponge or washcloth to wet the skin of the body and arms and legs.
      • The water itself does not cool the child. The evaporation of the water off the skin cools the child. So, do not cover the child with wet towels, which would prevent evaporation.
      • Contrary to the popular folk remedy, never apply alcohol in a bath or on the skin to reduce fever. Alcohol is usually dangerous to children.

 

  • The second goal is to keep the child from becoming dehydrated. Humans lose extra water from the skin and lungs during a fever.
    • Encourage the child to drink clear fluids but without caffeine (and not water). Water does not contain the necessary electrolytes and glucose. Other clear fluids are chicken soup,  other rehydrating drinks available at the grocery or drugstore.
    • A child should urinate light-colored urine at least every four hours if well hydrated.
    • If diarrhea or vomiting prevents one from assessing hydration, seek medical attention.

 

  • The third goal is to monitor the child for signs of serious or life-threatening illness.
    • A good strategy is to reduce the child's temperature below 102 F (39 C).
    • Also, make sure the child is drinking enough clear fluids .
    • If both these conditions are met and the child still appears ill, a more serious problem may exist.
    • If a child refuses to drink or has a concerning change in appearance or behavior, seek medical attention.
1 person found this helpful

Hi. I am having 5 months baby. I am not interested in commercially available cerelac. So I prepared home made cerelac made out of (wheat, rice, corn, black grams, dry fruits, horse gram, masoor dal and moong dal). But my doubt is can I give to my 5 months old baby. Please suggest me a diet chart and the foods I can feed to my baby.

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Hi. I am having 5 months baby. I am not interested in commercially available cerelac. So I prepared home made cerelac...
5months is ok to start soup thin half cup two to three timmes. At least three hrs after bottle or breast feeds. Foodmust be cereals ata dal powder curd or milk. Home made.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir my daughter 1 year 3 month old. Went for vaccine. But mistakely I forget my immunisation record of card at my home. The doctor given the vaccine to my doctor of chickenpox. But when I returned home. As per card my vaccine was mmr1. Is chicken pox and mmr are same. Or I have to go for mmr1 vaccine again. Please confirm me. I m in doubt.

MD - Paediatrics, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Mumbai
Sir my daughter 1 year 3 month old. Went for vaccine.
But mistakely I forget my immunisation record of card at my hom...
No, chicken pox and mmr are not same. They are two different vaccines. There is however, no harm if you have given a second dose of chicken pox by mistake. You an take her after a gap of one month (compulsory between 2 vaccines) and give her the mmr vaccine. No harm done but don't miss the mmr vaccine.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Jodhpur
Every newborn baby should be supplemented with 400 U.I of vitamin D till one year of age.
15 people found this helpful

I have 9 month old son still breast feeding. He bad sleeper all time more aft and night. I am plan to give him jaifal how many strokes to rub in stone. I do not know how much to give.

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
I have 9 month old son still breast feeding. He  bad sleeper all time more aft and night. I am plan  to give him jaif...
At six months we advice breast feeding at six hrs interval and in between 3-4 feeds of liquid to semisolid preparation cooked at home. Gradually breast milk frequency is three. Time at 8-9 months and two times at 12month age with increasingly other food at three hrly interval.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Protecting infants from abuse - Healthy Sex Talk with Kids of ages 1-5

MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Agra
Protecting infants from abuse - Healthy Sex Talk with Kids of ages 1-5
1. Teach children to ask permission before touching or embracing a playmate. Use language such as, “Sarah, let’s ask Joe if he would like to hug bye-bye.”
If Joe says “no” to this request, cheerfully tell your child, “That’s okay, Sarah! Let’s wave bye-bye to Joe and blow him a kiss.”
2. Help create empathy within your child by explaining how something they have done may have hurt someone. Use language like, “I know you wanted that toy, but when you hit Rohan, it hurt him and he felt very sad. And we don’t want Rohan to feel sad because we hurt him.”
Encourage your child to imagine how he or she might feel if Rohan had hit them, instead. This can be done with a loving tone and a big hug, so the child doesn’t feel ashamed or embarrassed.
3. Teach kids to help others who may be in trouble. Talk to kids about helping other children*, and alerting trusted grown-ups when others need help.
Ask your child to watch interactions and notice what is happening. Get them used to observing behavior and checking in on what they see.
Use the family pet as an example, “Oh, it looks like the cat's tail is stuck! We have to help her!!”
Praise your child for assisting others who need help, but remind them that if a grown-up needs help with anything, that it is a grown-up’s job to help. Praise your child for alerting you to people who are in distress, so that the appropriate help can be provided.
4. Teach your kids that “no” and “stop” are important words and should be honored. One way to explain this may be, “Smriti said ‘no’, and when we hear ‘no’ we always stop what we’re doing immediately. No matter what.”
Also teach your child that his or her “no’s” are to be honored. Explain that just like we always stop doing something when someone says “no”, that our friends need to always stop when we say “no”, too. If a friend doesn’t stop when we say “no,” then we need to think about whether or not we feel good, and safe, playing with them. If not, it’s okay to choose other friends.
If you feel you must intervene, do so. Be kind, and explain to the other child how important “no” is. Your child will internalize how important it is both for himself and others.
5. Encourage children to read facial expressions and other body language: Scared, happy, sad, frustrated, angry and more. Charade-style guessing games with expressions are a great way to teach children how to read body language.
6. Never force a child to hug, touch or kiss anybody, for any reason. If Grandma is demanding a kiss, and your child is resistant, offer alternatives by saying something like, “Would you rather give Grandma a high-five or blow her a kiss, maybe?”
You can always explain to Grandma, later, what you’re doing and why. But don’t make a big deal out of it in front of your kid. If it’s a problem for Grandma, so be it, your job now is doing what’s best for your child and giving them the tools to be safe and happy, and help others do the same.
7. Encourage children to wash their own genitals during bath time. Of course parents have to help sometimes, but explaining to little Joe that his penis is important and that he needs to take care of it is a great way to help encourage body pride and a sense of ownership of his or her own body.
Also, model consent by asking for permission to help wash your child’s body. Keep it upbeat and always honor the child’s request to not be touched.
“Can I wash your back now? How about your feet? How about your bottom?” If the child says “no” then hand them the washcloth and say, “Cool! Your booty needs a wash. Go for it.”
8. Give children the opportunity to say yes or no in everyday choices, too. Let them choose clothing and have a say in what they wear, what they play, or how they do their hair. Obviously, there are times when you have to step in (dead of winter when your child wants to wear a sundress would be one of those times!), but help them understand that you heard his or her voice and that it mattered to you, but that you want to keep them safe and healthy.
9. Allow children to talk about their body in any way they want, without shame. Teach them the correct words for their genitals, and make yourself a safe place for talking about bodies and sex.
Say, “I’m so glad you asked me that!” If you don’t know how to answer their questions the right way just then, say, “I’m glad you’re asking me about this, but I want to look into it. Can we talk about it after dinner?” and make sure you follow up with them when you say you will.
If your first instinct is to shush them or act ashamed, then practice it alone or with a partner. The more you practice, the easier it will be.
10. Talk about “gut feelings” or instincts. Sometimes things make us feel weird, or scared, or yucky and we don’t know why. Ask your child if that has ever happened with them and listen quietly as they explain.
Teach them that this “belly voice” is sometimes correct, and that if they ever have a gut feeling that is confusing, they can always come to you for help in sorting through their feelings and making decisions. And remind them that no one has the right to touch them if they don’t want it.
11. “Use your words.” Don’t answer and respond to temper tantrums. Ask your child to use words, even just simple words, to tell you what’s going on.
4 people found this helpful

My daughter is 19 months old. She is suffering from persistent diarrhoea of 7 to 10 days. She has been recommended ZnD, Zeedott, Benegut, Pedialyte. Worried about my little one as her intakes are very less. Urine output is also low. Though she is active but fussy about eating. Concerned about management of situation. We are trying to give her chaach, coconut water, khichdi, soup, soya milk etc. But she is not having it much.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
My daughter is 19 months old. She is suffering from persistent diarrhoea of 7 to 10 days. She has been recommended Zn...
Meaning of persistent diarrhoea is different for doctor than parents. If you have mentioned about No. motions in a day, quantity of stool, consistency, either with more water or feces, containing mucus and / or blood. related with dietic habbit. it would have been easy to suggest. Any way, if her wt is about 11 kg, you need not to worry. Give her food of her choice and sufficient quantity of water to drink insist forcing ors etc.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed