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Dr. H. S. Vedpathak

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)

Veterinarian, Mumbai

11 Years Experience
Dr. H. S. Vedpathak BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) Veterinarian, Mumbai
11 Years Experience
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. H. S. Vedpathak
Dr. H. S. Vedpathak is a renowned Veterinarian in Warden Road, Mumbai. He has helped numerous patients in his 11 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He studied and completed BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) . You can consult Dr. H. S. Vedpathak at K-9 Pet Clinic in Warden Road, Mumbai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. H. S. Vedpathak on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) - Bombay Veterinary College, Mumbai, - 2006
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Indian Veterinary Association

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45-D, Hussain Manor, Bomanji Petit Road, Off Warden Road, Mumbai 400026, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My dog is not eating very well, She is very active though? Wanted to know the reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As far as she is active there is no problem , her appetite is of very low level , can give liver supplements to improve their diet patterns . Please consult your vet
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My dog has a very allergic skin . All the time is does is itch . In itching he will loose some fur . I am.Very worried . I have a labrador . What to do

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Use any medicated shampoo for bath like pramoxine anti itch shampoo. Give balanced diet. Deworm your dog.
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My 7 months old labrador has some problem in his right forelimb (leg. Due to this he feel some pain when he stands up after a long rest. I gave him nimulid for three days. He is okay but when he stands up after sleeping he feel jerk on his leg and after a long walk he starts jerk walking.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hello, I suggest you get a small blood test done called complete blood count (cbc) and two xrays of the affected leg one from front (ap view) and from side (lateral view). There can be two chances, either bone deformity or blood parasite infection. Both can be treated if diagnosed early as possible. Once done, please share the reports with me to advice you further.
1 person found this helpful
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My Dog is active and smart. He is a cross breed of Gradient and Rajapalyamam but he still not grown big neither fat. He is always thin and hyper. Anything to worry or concern?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, what is the age of your dog? if it is active you dont worry about weight of the dog. Give good food which he likes and deworm regularly.
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I have a 13 years old pomeranian bitch. She had stopped eating since a few weeks. On getting her blood tested and sonography, reports say that her kidney is weak and urea level is high. What should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bangalore
With the age the dogs kidney starts losing its functional ability. So now all you have to do is managemental and supportive therapy. Changes in the feed like giving renal diet and phosphate binders has to be followed. If the dog is still not taking food, better to go for fluid therapy.
1 person found this helpful
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If a dog get fractured in his back. He is in great pain, even painkillers are not working. How many chances he have for survive?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Press the bone of the toe of the back leg. If the dog reacts in pain then chances r their. If not then thr is no hope.
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I have 22 months german shepherd female. N she is not eating properly. . Her health is not developing .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Need to access the food quality and you r diet regime and if needed we have to include more protein diet please consult a vet for diet.
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Hello doctors. My dog is a Labrador. And on some places on his body. Has few hairs. With redness. Specially on his tail. Please give some advice. I am now using wokazole lotion.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Hello doctors.
My dog is a Labrador. And on some places on his body. Has few hairs. With redness. Specially on his ta...
You should check for ticks infestation. Redness indicate mixed microbial infection. Wokazole is good enough for minor infection, but larger area of redness, require systemic antibiotic treatment.
1 person found this helpful
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I am from dhanbad I have a cow two days before she has eaten excess food grains due to which her stomach become very tight now she is not eating any thing so please help me what I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your cow is suffering from acidosis due to eating excess food grains. Give plenty of water and feed only greens if it takes for 2-3 days. Give RUMENTAS 2 boli 2 times daily for 3 days and also give BLONIL Liquid orally 50 ml 2 times daily for 2 days.
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What diet should be given to German shepherd (4-5 months old)? I' m currently giving 250gms of chicken with boiled rice, chapati with curd or milk and sometimes pedigree.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My advice would be going for the dog food as a whole as u r dog is grown up to 4 months try fidele or pedigree all the three times daily as you know dog requirement it 20 times more than what we need and also they require more fat. they grow very fast compare to the human so they need a carnivorous food not a food of omnivorous.
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Lot of hair loss for labordor,at age of 8 months sir please tel me any type of precautions or give me any type of medicine .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Rule out winter shedding which is as usual. give supplement of omega 3,6 fatty acids . and fish oil as supplement.
1 person found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

My pug dog has skin allergy and doctors told that it is a scabies. I have been doing many treatment for some months but its doesnt work so what can i do for my little pug ?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Scabies or skin problem in dogs takes a bit longer time to cure. Give your dog a well nutrition diet but slightly reduce quantity of protein in the diet for some days and observe. Trim the nails so that it wont scratch and increase the infection further. Continue wokazole and maintain hygiene at her surroundings. Try to avoid phenol compounds at home for moping the floor.
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Sir canine parvo virus us affected to my dog please say how many days curing will be done.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Dog or pups affected from parvo virus generally require treatment support from 4 to 15 days with average 5-6 days. Treatment is directed in controlling dehydration, reducing vomition and preventing secondary bacterial infection.
1 person found this helpful
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My kitten paw is bleeding. I took him to the vet she cleaned it and gave him injection but still he is not fine he has started limping.

master of veterinary science
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Its quite natural that he is limping it will take time to heal and you will need a follow up with your vet.
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Hi, have a pet (dashing dog). Having itching, dandruff and hairfall problem from last 5 months. We tried all remedies like using neem oil massage, ridd etc but no use. Please suggest home remedies to cure immediately. Thanks.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear karthik, please go through following treatment for better result 1. Inj. Hitek 0.5 ml s/c and apply himax tube in local effectted area.
2 people found this helpful
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I have lhasa apso puppy 50days old he is not drinking water his urin is smell strong. As he not drinking water I give him milk. He eat drools starters.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Normally puppies don't like to drink water. It is better to give dahi rather than milk. You can give dry starter feed to them. When he eat dry feed then definitely drink water.
6 people found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

Sir I have a dog by one compounder wrong injections it is in final stage it is not eating food and water from 8 days and not standing with legs.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
if you can send photos, videos, photocopies of investigation results, at least we can try to penetrate and suggest you something on critical care, if you do not have potent qualified small animal health care facilities at your area. This is called tele-medicine too. One thing you need to do in absence of such facilities at your area, appoint one paravet who can inject, administer iv fluids and draw blood samples. Now send photos of your dog from different angles, try to capture videos with close take without missing its vital life activities like responsiveness to stimuli or its alertness, its movements that are present-- like its response to food and water etc. What more you can do, if you have veterinary pathological laboratory at your place or at your knowledge, just go for some blood tests. This may include cbc+diff, serum creatinine, urea, bun, serumna+, k+, ca++, lft, fasting blood glucose. Without wasting time, not to detain next treatment procedure to start you need to come out with all these promptly whether you are taking your pet to any hospital or consulting here with any qualified vet to initiate life saving attempts. But do not consult anyone who is not a licenced vet.
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