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Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar  - Veterinarian, Mumbai

Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar

Diploma in Veterinary Science

Veterinarian, Mumbai

29 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic
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Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar Diploma in Veterinary Science Veterinarian, Mumbai
29 Years Experience  ·  250 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar
Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar is an experienced Veterinarian in Jawhar, Mumbai. Doctor has helped numerous patients in his/her 27 years of experience as a Veterinarian. Doctor has completed Diploma in Veterinary Science. You can consult Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar at Sai Veterinary Clinic in Jawhar, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Mumbai. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
Diploma in Veterinary Science - Konkan Krishi Vidalaya Peeth Dapali, Ratnagiri, - 1989
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Deepak K. Savaratkar

Sai Veterinary Clinic

# 9,Old Maneklala EstateLBS Road, Near Telephone Exchange,Landmark: Near to Telephone Exchange Office, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
250 at clinic
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My dog is 3 mnths, while jumping he broke one of his tooth. Since then he is uneasy, biting evrything. Pls suggest. What should we do to make him easy? thanks.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Well, he's uneasy because he's getting new set of teeth. Called as teething. The tooth he broke was milk tooth/deciduous tooth and should be replaced by permanent one soon. Make sure you offer him balanced food. Non edible toys, bigger than size of his head can be given to chew upon.
4 people found this helpful

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

mera ek dogy ka size chhota hi rkhna chahta hu.kya koi aisa treatment hai. [I have a pet dog and I want to keep him small sized. Any treatment possible?]

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please tell your breed and age. Also it cant be possible for a heavy breed to keep it small you have to choose a smaller breed for this rather than asking to keep it small.
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My Dog is active and smart. He is a cross breed of Gradient and Rajapalyamam but he still not grown big neither fat. He is always thin and hyper. Anything to worry or concern?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, what is the age of your dog? if it is active you dont worry about weight of the dog. Give good food which he likes and deworm regularly.
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4 Way To Make Dog Healthy!

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot

4 Way To Make Dog Healthy are:

1. Vaccinations 
2. Deworming
3. Right food timely 
4. Exercises 
 

2 people found this helpful

My dog is a labrador,it got some ear infection ,with green pus,andd smelling bad,and it resstless due to that.Please help

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Its seems ur dog has bacterial infection. It requires ear cleaning and ear drops and systemic antibiotic therapy
1 person found this helpful
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My dog has severe pain in ears. So, please give me some tips to cure my dog's infection.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
It seems that your dog is suffering from otitis externa. Regular cleaning of ear with cleaning soln. And ear drops (pomisol) can cure infection.
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Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc.-Pathology
Veterinarian, Bangalore
Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

Many animals receive “kennel cough” vaccines that include bordetella and cpi and cav-2 every 6 to 9 months without evidence that this frequency of vaccination is necessary or beneficial. In contrast, other dogs are never vaccinated for kennel cough and diseases are not seen. Cpi immunity lasts at least 3 years when given intranasally and cav -2 immunity lasts a minimum of 7 years parenterally for cav-i. These two virus in combination with bordetella bronchiseptica are the agents, which are often associated with kennel cough, however, other factors play an important role in diseases (eg. Stress, dust, humidity, molds, mycoplasma, etc.).

Thus, kennel cough is not a vaccine preventable disease because of the complex factors associated with this disease. Furthermore, this is often a mild to moderate self limiting disease. It's just like common cold in humans. A course of antibiotics usually is enough to treat the condition. I generally do not recommend kennel cough vaccines unless dogs are staying in a boarding facility that requires them.

2 people found this helpful
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