Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Book
Call

Dr. D Tandel

Neurologist, Mumbai

500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. D Tandel Neurologist, Mumbai
500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. D Tandel
Dr. D Tandel is a popular Neurologist in Opera House, Mumbai. You can meet Dr. D Tandel personally at Bay View Clinic in Opera House, Mumbai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. D Tandel on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Neurologists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Neurologists with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Mumbai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. D Tandel

Bay View Clinic

Back Bay View 1st floor, 3A Mama Parmanand Marg, Opera House. Landmark: Next to TBZ Jewellers, Opposite Charni Road Station, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
500 at clinic
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. D Tandel

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I am feeling partial numbness on my right toe from last 15 days. I had a long drive just before that and that cause. Numbness on almost on foot but that gone away after few hrs and that is usual. I detected with pre diabetic last year but with few changes that recovered.

MD - Alternate Medicine, BHMS
Homeopath, Surat
I am feeling partial numbness on my right toe from last 15 days. I had a long drive just before that and that cause. ...
Take Calc Phos 6X one dose daily for 2 weeks. It will be alright. Still if you have any queries, please let me know. Take care. :)
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Tips to Deal with a Patient Recovering from Brain Surgery

FRCS - Neurosurgery(UK), M.Ch - Neuro Surgery, MS - General Surgery, MBBS
Neurosurgeon, Ahmedabad
Tips to Deal with a Patient Recovering from Brain Surgery

Undergoing Brain Surgery can be a very traumatic experience, and it is common for many patients recovering from brain surgery to face depression, spells of dizziness, confusion and weakness post the surgery. It can be very critical that family members and friends talk to the patient and be empathetic towards them.

It takes approximately 12-18 months for the brain to heal after a brain surgery and slowly and gradually the patient will regain all his normal functions and get back to his daily routine. However in that time they need the complete support and understanding of their families, as well may need help from therapists. This will help the patient in gaining back their independence as well as confidence in their abilities.

Here are some tips that will help you deal with a patient recovering from Brain Surgery:

  1. After brain surgery, a person may feel disoriented and have some speech or understanding disability for a while. Family members and friends are advised to take pause when talking to the patient, so that he/she can easily understand the conversation. Speaking slowly is not recommended, as patients may recognize it and have an emotional outburst or feel hurt.

  2. Caretakers and family members should also keep reminding the conversation topic at different points to the patient, so that it is easier for them to participate in the conversation.

  3. Family members should also not react adversely in case of emotional outbursts, instead show love and patience to a person recovering from brain surgery.

  4. Caregivers should make sure that the person recovering from brain surgery gets enough sleep and rest to recuperate.

  5. People interacting with someone recovering from brain surgery should understand that the person's ability to learn and remember will improve daily, and any lapses in attention by the patient are not caused by any act of obstinacy. Your care and understanding will be essential for a person to recover.

  6. Family members should also make sure just to give enough care and not smother the brain surgery survivor. It is essential for them to regain their confidence and a sense of competence.

Family members should take the patient for a neuropsychological examination--after treatment, 6 months later, and a year later to see if they are recovering properly. Caregivers should watch out for emotional outbursts, like rage, uncontrollable laughter, withdrawal and depression. In case of such symptoms it is advisable to take the patient for a check up with medical practitioner. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor and ask a free question.

2851 people found this helpful

Hi doctor! Whst are general symptoms of a person suffering from insomnia apart fro sleepiness. Is der any specific medicine that csn help?

FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Headache body fatigue general debility etc Do Take balanced diet and avoid stress anxiety and anticipating the things Do regular physical activity and breathing exercises for about 15 minutes duration each time regularly Best Wishes
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir mein jab bhi koi heavy object uthaata hu ya fir kuch der hold karta hu toh mere hands kaampne lag jate hai. Means hands me tremor hota hai.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
It is because of nutritional deficiency... especially protein and calcium.. and muscular weakness.... You may start doing some physical exercise.. Take a multivitamin tablet.... (nutrilite Daily) Also do some pranayams.. and yogas... If you need homoeopathic treatment then you can consult anytime..
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir in my left hand my index finger is shaking from last 3 days. When I open my all fingers index finger shows shaking finger. Is it a disease if yes then to whom I should consult.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Sir in my left hand my index finger is shaking from last 3 days. When I open my all fingers index finger shows shakin...
It can be due to anxiety or due to triggering of muscle and needs to be treated with a neurologist.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

What are Absence Seizures?

MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

What are absence seizures?

An absence seizure causes you to blank out or stare into space for a few seconds. They can also be called petit mal seizures. Absence seizures are most common in children and typically don’t cause any long-term problems. These types of seizures are often set off by a period of hyperventilation.

Absence seizures usually occur in children between ages 4 to 14. A child may have 10, 50, or even 100 absence seizures in a given day and they may go unnoticed. Most children who have typical absence seizures are otherwise normal. However, absence seizures can get in the way of learning and affect concentration at school. This is why prompt treatment is important.

Absence seizures are a type of epilepsy, a condition that causes seizures. Seizures are caused by abnormal brain activity. These mixed messages confuse your brain and cause a seizure.

Not everyone who has a seizure has epilepsy. Usually, a diagnosis of epilepsy can be made after two or more seizures.

Absence seizures often occur along with other types of seizures that cause muscle jerking, twitching, and shaking. Absence seizures may be confused with other types of seizures. Doctors will pay close attention to your symptoms in order to make the right diagnosis. This is very important for effective and safe treatment of your seizures.

It’s uncommon for absence seizures to continue into adulthood, but it’s possible to have an absence seizure at any age.

What causes absence seizures?

Like other kinds of seizures, absence seizures are caused by abnormal activity in a person’s brain. Doctors often don’t know why this happens. Most absence seizures are less than 15 seconds long. It’s rare for an absence seizure to last longer than 15 seconds. They can happen suddenly without any warning signs.

What are the symptoms of absence seizures?

The easiest way to spot an absence seizure is to look for a blank stare that lasts for a few seconds. People in the midst of having an absence seizure don’t speak, listen, or appear to understand. An absence seizure doesn’t typically cause you to fall down. You could be in the middle of making dinner, walking across the room, or typing an e-mail when you have the seizure. Then suddenly you snap out of it and continue as you were before the seizure.

These are other possible symptoms of an absence seizure:

  • Being very still

  • Smacking the lips or making a chewing motion with the mouth

  • Fluttering the eyelids

  • Stopping activity (suddenly not talking or moving)

  • Suddenly returning to activity when the seizure ends

If you experience jerking motions, it may be a sign of another type of seizure taking place along with the absence seizure.

How are absence seizures diagnosed?

You may have absence seizures repeatedly for years before heading to the doctor for a diagnosis. You may have “staring spells” without thinking of them as a medical problem or a seizure.

An EEG is a test most often used to diagnose absence seizures. This test records the brain’s electrical activity and spots any abnormalities that could indicate an absence seizure.

These tests also can help to diagnose absence seizures or rule out other conditions:

  • Blood tests

  • Tests of the kidneys and liver

  • CT or MRI scans

  • Spinal tap to test the cerebrospinal fluid

How are absence seizures treated?

Absence seizures can affect your ability to perform at work or school, so it’s a good idea to see your healthcare provider about treatment.

Absence seizures can be treated with a number of different antiseizure medicines. The type of medicine that your healthcare provider recommends you take will also depend on what other seizure disorder you may have. If you have more than one type of seizure disorder, you may need to take multiple medicines.

Can absence seizures be prevented?

Taking your medicines exactly as your doctor prescribed is one of the best ways to manage absence seizures. But you can also make some changes in your life to help prevent absence seizures from happening. These include:

  • Get plenty of sleep each night.

  • Find ways to manage your stress.

  • Eat a healthy diet.

  • Exercise regularly.

Living with absence seizures

Most people with epilepsy live full and active lives with medicine and other lifestyle changes. But it can be challenging at times to manage large and small life events when you have epilepsy. Depending on your age and the severity and type of epilepsy, you may need support with the following:

  • Behavioral and emotional issues. It is important to get enough sleep and manage stress when you have epilepsy. Stress and lack of sleep can trigger seizures. If you have trouble sleeping, talk with your healthcare provider about how to make sure you get enough sleep. Learn coping techniques that will help you manage stress and anxiety.

  • Employment. With proper treatment, people with epilepsy can do just about any job safely and effectively. But, certain jobs in which there is a high risk to public safety may not be an option. Epilepsy is covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This law prohibits discrimination against people with epilepsy and other disabilities.

  • Coping with discrimination and stigma. Children and adults with epilepsy may face discrimination and struggle to overcome the stigma associated with this neurological condition. Help educate family, friends, co-workers, and classmates on your condition. Let them know what to expect and how to help during a seizure.

  • Education. Children with epilepsy may be entitled to special services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Working closely with the child’s teacher and school nurse will help improve management of epilepsy at school. It’s important for parents of children with epilepsy to balance safety and fun. Allow your child to have some age-appropriate independence and participate in sports and other activities at school, when possible.

  • Driving. Each state has different driving laws for people with epilepsy. Licensing may depend on how severe seizures are and how well they are controlled. Consider public transportation where it is available. If you continue to have absence seizures, it may not be safe for you to drive.

  • Support and online resources. You may feel alone in dealing with day-to-day life with epilepsy, but be assured that many people have epilepsy. You can find local support groups through your healthcare provider or local hospital. Many online resources give tools and tips for managing this condition. Online social media support groups bring together people from all over the world who are managing their epilepsy. These groups provide support and encouragement.

If you have trouble managing your absence seizures, you may want to work more closely with your healthcare provider to find a better way to treat them.

Key points about absence seizures

  • Absence seizures are seizures that generally last just a few seconds, and are characterized by a blank or “absent” stare.

  • Absence seizures usually occur in children between ages 4 to 14, but it’s possible to have an absence seizure at any age.

  • Absence seizures are easy to miss, but tests and an evaluation of symptoms can diagnose them.

  • Healthcare providers can usually help find the right mix of medications and lifestyle changes to manage absence seizures.

  • Without treatment, school performance, work, and relationships can suffer.

Submit FeedbackFeedback

What are the symptoms of brain tumor? How can it be cured? Tell me something about brain tumor.

FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Head ache blurred vision Abdomen pain and it is basically abnormal accumulation of cells it can be benign or Malignant
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

87%
(82 ratings)

Dr. Siddharth Kharkar

MBBS, MHS, MD - Neurology (USA), Fellowship In Epilepsy, Clinical Attachment In Movement Disorders
Neurologist
Wockhardt Hospital, 
at clinic
Book Appointment