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Dr. D. M. Bapat

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)

Veterinarian, Mumbai

23 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
Dr. D. M. Bapat BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) Veterinarian, Mumbai
23 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. D. M. Bapat
Dr. D. M. Bapat is a renowned Veterinarian in Worli, Mumbai. He has been a successful Veterinarian for the last 23 years. He has completed BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) . You can consult Dr. D. M. Bapat at Dr. Bapat's My Lovely Pet Shop in Worli, Mumbai. Book an appointment online with Dr. D. M. Bapat and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Mumbai. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) - Bombay Veterinary College, Mumbai, - 1994
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Pet Practitioners Association of Mumbai (PPAM)

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Dr. Bapat's My Lovely Pet Shop

Rakhangi Mahal, Worli, Landmark: Behind City Bakery & Near Wellness Medical, MumbaiMumbai Get Directions
150 at clinic
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My dog is having problem that . It happens quite regularly when we take him out fr walk . He is having some sort of pain he lie on ground legs bend to all sides sliva coming out and starts trembling . It happen fr almost 10 minutes and after that again normal . Whats the problem to him . Some time it happens at home also . Can u help ?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
De-worming should be done . Give a well balanced diet. Supplement with calcium and multivitamins available in the local market. Even the symptoms doesn't reduce after 10 days take to the nearest vet for further investigation.
3 people found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

Hi I have a pair of guinea pigs one male and another female so female's upper tooth are broken and she not eating any type and now near condition is very serious so please help me doctor

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Through out life guniea pig" s teeths are continuously growing. So if they are broken it is better you should hand fed your guniea pig till they are fully grown back to normal. If there is infection then you should consult vet.
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My dog has skin disease he sleep on wet place the place is effected him so what can I do please tell me my dog is not well please any body help me to help my dog because I love him allot.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Do not let him sleep in wet places. Wetness/dampness attracts fungus and can cause chronic skin problems.
3 people found this helpful

brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

Sir I have a dog by one compounder wrong injections it is in final stage it is not eating food and water from 8 days and not standing with legs.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
if you can send photos, videos, photocopies of investigation results, at least we can try to penetrate and suggest you something on critical care, if you do not have potent qualified small animal health care facilities at your area. This is called tele-medicine too. One thing you need to do in absence of such facilities at your area, appoint one paravet who can inject, administer iv fluids and draw blood samples. Now send photos of your dog from different angles, try to capture videos with close take without missing its vital life activities like responsiveness to stimuli or its alertness, its movements that are present-- like its response to food and water etc. What more you can do, if you have veterinary pathological laboratory at your place or at your knowledge, just go for some blood tests. This may include cbc+diff, serum creatinine, urea, bun, serumna+, k+, ca++, lft, fasting blood glucose. Without wasting time, not to detain next treatment procedure to start you need to come out with all these promptly whether you are taking your pet to any hospital or consulting here with any qualified vet to initiate life saving attempts. But do not consult anyone who is not a licenced vet.
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My dog is having some kind of invection on his ear.Like its kind of spoiled or anything.What shall i do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
First look at the ear lobes of your dog, is it erect or drooping. Check for any discharge from the ears, if possible try to clean gently with sterile ear bud. If you see any colour or smell of ear bud , take to vet for ear cleaning. If the infection seems to be severe, even the culture of ear washings can help us for right antibiotic.
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My female spitz aged 2yr limps frequently, as if she has pain in her hind legs. What could be the possible reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Check the paws and other inter digits for the foreign bodies and any history of ticks in the body for the past 4-5 months pls let me know
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My one year old German shepherd is not eating food and has become very lazy. He has pain in his hind legs from quite sometime and he never lets us touch his hind legs. Today we have given him 250mg Crocin. What else can be done please . Suggest.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Plz check the paws of the back legs. Thr can b a boil or a wound causing pain or hip joint complications. If you do not find any wound or swelling between the paws then ill suggest you get a hip joint xray done soon instead of blindly giving crocin which may mask the intensity of the pain n diagnosis.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is 5 years old and it is a street dog, he is suffering from cough from last one week. Please Suggest can we give him some cough syrup?

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Hello, As your pet is suffering from cough, i'll suggest you to get him checked by nearby vet and also a xray examination. This will help you to know the exact reason for coughing. As their are many etiological factors for coughing, only symptomatic treatment with cough syrup is not advisable. So get a proper advice from a vet after complete examination of your pet. Hope this information is helpful for you. Thank you.
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Is there any antiviral medicine for canine distemper? Please tell me. If it works 50% also then tell me.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Sorry, till date there is no effective antiviral against distemper only alternatives is timely to prevent disease.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is 16 year old yesterday he wake up in the evening his neck is tilted and silva comes out from his mouth frequently. Now doctors says its a paralysis attack. So they gave him some injections and ib drip. Of glucose and saline but the condition is still same he is not able to sleep, eat and walk he trying to walk but goes down after 4 -5 steps. Please advise something so he can recover fast.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your dog can have inner ear infection. Specially the side whr the head is tilted. Explains both salivation (vomiting sensation) and pain (tilting of head, loss of hunger, loss of sleep). Improper walking can happen if the balance between both of the ears is lost for any reason. Imagine your self rotating 20 times. In your dogz case it could an infection and no actual neurological issue. Kindly ask your doctor to do an otoscopy for the ear and send swab samples for culture test. Good luck.
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I have a 4 months old German shepherd . His ears are bending towards each other and have finally touched each other . Is there a problem ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Its not a problem usually the ear pinnae or the cartilage would be strong .its not mandatory to be straight for all dogs . so don't worry sir
1 person found this helpful
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We have adopted a Persian cat she is 5 months old she is getting some infection kind a things on her right ear corner and on her back please suggest.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, you should deworm your dog every month upto 6m and later every 3 months. Clean the ear with ambiflush ear drops every 10 days/ after bathing. Follow manufacture instructions.
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I had got a fallen squirrel baby so what should I feed him and how to keep him warm ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use a carton box with 60 watts buld ata distance of 1.5 feet above the baby so that the box get heated and in frequent interval switch off and on it and feed him with cerlac in semi diluted state with syringe.
1 person found this helpful
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6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
673 people found this helpful

Some doctor had told that she had pyometra. So what will be sign and symptoms? Is it curable or not?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Surgical treatment is required in pyometra. You should asked your vet to go for complete blood test, before she go for surgery, in order to check her vital for surgery. Normally discharge come from her genital but it depends on whether cervix is open or not.
1 person found this helpful
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Hi I am 28 year old I just want a help to you I just want to have a pet but is their any health problem in that please tell me about that just for my hobby and its about cat.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
U must remember having a pet is always welcome for animal lovers but as long as you keep the animal in an hygienically clean environment, take its care well. You hv to remember animals transmit infections to human and vice versa. Hence take all advised preventive protocols and you and your family will b most happy having a little pet in the house.
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Hiii, which feed should I prefer in royal canine for German shepherd of age 2 years.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
royal canin GSD food also is there. For adult dogs. Main thing is that you should choose that one only which you can afford fully to give to your dog as per manufacturer's guidelines
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He is 4 years old pomeranian dog. Weight 8 kg approx. He is losing his air in large amount everyday. He lives in my personal room. I feed him puppy gravy n eggs. N he never be in contact wid any stray dog. I gave him neomec injection. But I did not find any result. So please help. My dog. Tell me the best medicine and injection. Please.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Hair loss is regular process in dogs, they shed their old hair and new hairs comes. Kindly brush daily with shredding brush, feed well balanced diet and use fatty acids supplements. You can have complete examination with your vet and he can advise best feeding scheduled and recommend supplements.
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