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Dr. Subodh Pal

BVSc

Veterinarian, Kolkata

16 Years Experience
Dr. Subodh Pal BVSc Veterinarian, Kolkata
16 Years Experience
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Subodh Pal
Dr. Subodh Pal is a renowned Veterinarian in Sealdah, Kolkata. He has helped numerous patients in his 16 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He has done BVSc . You can meet Dr. Subodh Pal personally at ASTHA VETERINARY CLINIC in Sealdah, Kolkata. Book an appointment online with Dr. Subodh Pal and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVSc - Veterinarian College Of Kolkata - 2001
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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ASTHA VETERINARY CLINIC

86 A, Near Moulali Astha Clinic, Dr Suresh Sarkar Road, SealdahKolkata Get Directions
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

I have a grerman sheperd dog and he's 9 months old. He's having some stomach problems he always shouts with pain and sometimes eve cries. We're using many tablets bt ntg is working! And he is very smelly too even after a bath and his hair so falling.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
What tablets you gave for your pet? Give a balanced food, give more fluids, deworming to be done, give bath with medicated shampoo.
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Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bangalore
Is Kennel Cough Vaccine Really Necessary for Dogs?

Many animals receive “kennel cough” vaccines that include bordetella and cpi and cav-2 every 6 to 9 months without evidence that this frequency of vaccination is necessary or beneficial. In contrast, other dogs are never vaccinated for kennel cough and diseases are not seen. Cpi immunity lasts at least 3 years when given intranasally and cav -2 immunity lasts a minimum of 7 years parenterally for cav-i. These two virus in combination with bordetella bronchiseptica are the agents, which are often associated with kennel cough, however, other factors play an important role in diseases (eg. Stress, dust, humidity, molds, mycoplasma, etc.).

Thus, kennel cough is not a vaccine preventable disease because of the complex factors associated with this disease. Furthermore, this is often a mild to moderate self limiting disease. It's just like common cold in humans. A course of antibiotics usually is enough to treat the condition. I generally do not recommend kennel cough vaccines unless dogs are staying in a boarding facility that requires them.

2 people found this helpful

I have cone to know that tiles are not good for dogs? Is that true My dog can't grip on tiles or marble he slips also there is change in his way of walking So I make him walk on tough floor for 1.5 hours a day is that okay? He is just 40 days.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi lybrate-user, Yes, puppies may loose grip on too much smoothen tiles. Allow him to walk occasionally on non slippery floor to develop strength in the bones. At a time 1.5 hrs not required for your pup, give him a complete balanced diet.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello Doctor, My pet name is Candy she is 2 years old, And she is doberman and lab cross. We would like to feed her different taste of foods. Till now we have t feed her any sweet or spicy. And tomorrow it her birthday we would like to serve her some sweet. Could you please advice us what kind of dish good for her . Kindly suggest us shall we feed her sugar free cakes.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Sugar and sweet is not advice for dogs you can feed him nice beef gravy or veg gravy meant to dog available in market . Also can feed him chew with non veg or veg as per u r requirement to him but no cakes and sweets please
1 person found this helpful
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Hi Sir, Two three people said that after dog bite, we should not give head bath and my daughter (3 yrs. 10 months) should not get cold. Is this true?

General Physician, Lucknow
No these are wrong hearsays. Please do not follow them. Immediatley after a dog bite try to wash the wound with mild soap and running tap water.
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Hi , i have a dog age 5 Yrs .Lab . His hair shedding alot and its almost gone near genitalia .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please consult a vet it might because of skin infection or else send me photos so could suggest first aid . Still consulting a vet near by is appreciable.
1 person found this helpful
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Hi my male gsd has turned 1 this April and I want to nueter him also he has developed umbilical hernia, both the operations at same time now is it okay for my dogs health?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
ye it is better to opeate two thing in on ananesthesia so animal is not under anaesthesia twice if proper care is taken then both wound will heal nicely and dog is free of pain for life
1 person found this helpful
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How many times to feed a stray dog? n what food to feed exactly so that they get all the nutrients they need?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Feed twice with dog food available in the market at the rate of 300 gms in the morning and 200 in the evening . foods like pedigree, rc, hills, drools, smart heart , farmina , chickopee,etc a lot ranges available
2 people found this helpful
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What is the right age for a dog collar for my german shephard? he is 2 months old can I put him in leash? suggest whether it is harmful or not?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
I prefer not before 4 months, u can have weight less choke or fancy collar just to have a hold on him but cant tie until 4 months of age.
1 person found this helpful
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I think my dog have an ear infection. What should i do? and he does not let me touch his ear.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Ear infection is painful so u hv to show to vet so he will put muzzle or under sedation he will clean ear and tell proper medicine
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Pet scan report says that it is hodgkins lymphoma stage 2 suggest me for what can I do?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Hodgkins lymphoma can be treated with chemotherapy. But in most of the cases their are remission of lymphoma. Normal survival rate of dog is 6 month to 1 year.
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My german shepherd is 8 months old and is a very happy and energetic dog. From last 2-3 days (21/12/2015) he is foaming too much. We give him roti and meat two times daily and drools. He is eating well but I am worried for his excess salivation. I just want to know whether it is normal or not?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Darjeeling
Excessive salivation is not at all a normal thing. You did not mention the deworming and vaccination status. I think your pet needs deworming and you have to repeat it in every 3 months interval. Along with that, give him liver tonic and a syrup with digestive enzymezes. If this condition persists even after that, go for feeding ors along with antacids and antivomitic medicines. I am sure that it will be alright then.
2 people found this helpful
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My puppy (Golden Retriever) is 38 days old. It shakes its head very often. My parents are planning to give it back. So please tell me, is it really something so serious. Please give me reply Asap. Please .

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Head shaking as if shivering or fits? it could be a simple low sugar problem to severe brain problem. Please check a simple blood sugar check like we do for humans and see if the blood glucose level is below 60.
2 people found this helpful
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I have a female labra 2 years old of normal dimensions. She got crossed with a street dog and I do not want her to bear any puppies suggest me the most appropriate pill.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your labra can only get pregnant if the street dogz penis was stuck inside the vagina for atleast 15min. This is called knotting. Otherwise chances of conceiving is nill and can lead to unecessary complications by hormonal contraceptive pills. In case you havnt seen how long was the knotting, ill suggest you wait till 38days, n see if the size of the milk teats by tht time. If yes, then we can start treatment. Please note tht thr is no harm waiting till then. Infact much safer.
2 people found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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4 people found this helpful

My 2 month old labrador puppy is detected with canine distemper. Please tell me the cure and treatment for this disease.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Can use some poultry vaccine in initial stage to cure but if crosses stages can not do anything but still can maintain it.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
TODAY DONE SURGERY OF PAPILLA CANCEROUS OUT GROWTH OF VULVA REGION OF SPITZ CROSS BREED DOG - DONE RADICAL REMOVAL
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