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Dr. Sneha Das

Psychologist, Kolkata

Dr. Sneha Das Psychologist, Kolkata
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Sneha Das
Dr. Sneha Das is a trusted Psychologist in Rabindrapally, Kolkata. You can consult Dr. Sneha Das at Sujatha Clinic in Rabindrapally, Kolkata. Book an appointment online with Dr. Sneha Das and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Psychologists from across India. You will find Psychologists with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychologists online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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I am a student I feel very depressed with out any reason please help me how to get rid of this depression.

M.S. Counselling and Psychotherapy
Psychologist
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I am a student I feel very depressed with out any reason please help me how to get rid of this depression.
Dear lybrate user, please contact your college counsellor. The counsellor will help your to understand your feelings, fears etc. And will help you to cope up with life. Take care.

Since I lost my only 2 children, am always on shocked, am depressed any solution for it sir?

M.D,Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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Really very sad to read it. But life has to go on. God has some other plans for us. You can start with tab escitalopram 10mg daily after breakfast. Take tab etizolam0.5 mg twice a day.
2 people found this helpful

I have been smoking since past 20 years. I want to quit it. But I can't. I don't have enough will. Please help me.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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Only by using strong will power and avoiding all situations where you feel like smoking, chewing tobacco or drinking or using drugs/ weed, avoiding friends who smoke and diverting mind by reading or chewing a gum, like NICORETTE and taking a walk when you crave for a smoke can all help. You can chew Nicorette gum which is nicotine replacement. There are medicines available. Which can be prescribed if asked personally Cigarette smoking is a leading preventable cause of mortality. It kills more than 60 lakh people worldwide every year. More than 50% of regular smokers would invariably die from tobacco-related illnesses which includes heart attack, cancer or asthmatic lung diseases. Best age to stop smoking is before 40 31st May is “World No Tobacco Day” Quitting smoking before the age of 40 is associated with larger decline in premature death than stopping it at a later date. Best age therefore to stop smoking is before 40. However, stopping smoking even after the age of 50 is still associated with lower risk of death as compared to those who continue to smoke. Even in smokers aged 80 years or more, quitting smoking appears to reduce some mortality.
2 people found this helpful

My boss is very angry person he give me lots it task to do and I haven't sleep from 3days.

MD - Alternate Medicine, BHMS
Homeopath
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My boss is very angry person he give me lots it task to do and I haven't sleep from 3days.
Better you do this. Sleep with legs raised up against the wall making 90 degree for 10 mins. This will relax your body and mind within 5-7 mins and make you sleep too.
3 people found this helpful

I have been under going depression for many days because of my parents. I feel like staying alone and far from my family. They always compare me with others.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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I have been under going depression for many days because of my parents. I feel like staying alone and far from my fam...
This is unfortunately very true in many homes. But you must remember that you are you: absolutely unique and can be compared to others in terms of progress and failure too. That does not mean you have to imitate the other persons to become good. Give them a deaf ear or talk to a counselor about your problems. Perhaps the counselor will want to speak to your parents and help you deal with it. Running away will solve nothing.
2 people found this helpful

How can I more energetic, day by day I losing my energy. And I have so many tensions also how to remove and over come it?

MSC Human Development , Hypnotherapy , Special Educator , ms- counselling and physiotherapy, Applied psychology Hons
Psychologist
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How can I more energetic, day by day I losing my energy. And I have so many tensions also how to remove and over come...
You can go for a morning walk or can do some light exercise in starting and and than add more exercise. Or you can do breathing exercise or yoga it will give strength to your mind and body both.

I'm trying to quit smoking and I'm not able to do it. Please suggest me natural way to quit smoking.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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Only by using strong will power and avoiding all situations where you feel like smoking, chewing tobacco or drinking or using drugs avoiding friends who smoke and diverting mind by reading or chewing a gum, like NICORETTE and taking a walk when you crave for a smoke can all help. You can chew Nicorette gum which is nicotine replacement. There are medicines available. Which can be prescribed if asked personally Cigarette smoking is a leading preventable cause of mortality. It kills more than 60 lakh people worldwide every year. More than 50% of regular smokers would invariably die from tobacco-related illnesses which includes heart attack, cancer or asthmatic lung diseases. Best age to stop smoking is before 40
1 person found this helpful

I loss my concentration power Also I have a breath problem My heartbeats are rapidly like train.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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You must go for a full medical examination to a physician and check the breathing and heart beat problems. I suspect that the adolescent issues with regard to hormones may be affecting your ability to concentrate and remember. When the hormones play up, it lasts for a period of close to two years and during that time you could be influenced by three signs directly impacted by the chemical: you will tend to become aggressive and rebellious, you will become sexually active, and you will have acne and pimple problems. The hormonal imbalances may not only impact your memory because of the chemical but also bring some distractions that come with it. But you may work on the following even if the hormones kick in: Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Have a special place of learning, which should be well lit, with soft painted walls, well-ventilated, with no distractions. When you get bored, study by writing. If you repeat learning at least five to seven times, you will apparently remember for a longer time. Sit comfortably but do not slouch. The reading material should be of a fairly large print. Study at small intervals of about 40 minutes and then take a break or change the subject.There is a new exercise called Super Brain Yoga, which is done by holding the right earlobe with your left thumb and index finger, and the left earlobe with your right hand’s thumb and index finger. In this position you must squat down and rise up and do this for five minutes every day. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. There are some memory enhancing techniques and study methods that your teacher will be able to guide you with. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely. In that case, I suggest that the family goes for counseling too. The following foods do help too: Blueberries, walnuts, turmeric, Spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, acorn squash, green tea, oily fish, boiled egg, turkey, apples, oatmeal, leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds, avocado, cinnamon, thyme, sunflower seeds, and red wine. Avoid junk food.

I am 33 year old .but if do some little work also I feel stressed and feel lazy .

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath
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I am 33 year old .but if do some little work also I feel stressed and feel lazy .
Take protein rich food ---eggs, milk products, dry fruits, seeds, pulses, mutter, soya bean. Cereals, potatoes, sweet potatoes, plantains etc. Can be useful for gaining weight. Also take vegetables, greens and fruits. Have vigorous physical exercise to improve digestion and absorption of food as well as blood circulation.

I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.

I don't know how to read. Even though I read & revise many times I forget them. Again wen I start to read I will feel that I am reading it for first time. How can improve my memory power & how should I read. is there any procedure that I can do so that I can concentrate?

SLE, Fellowship In Diabetology, Diploma In Psychology Mental Health And Illness, PLAB (MANCHESTOR, UK), FAGE, MBBS
General Physician
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Thanks for your query. This can happen because you are unable to concentrate on what you are reading or it is presented to you in a manner that you cannot retain in your memory or you are too busy and occupied with activities other than study either in your mind or outside. At your age memory problems are uncommon. You just have to modify the way you study. Please contact me in private section and I will be able to advise accordingly. Please ask me in private section for medicines.

I'm a alcoholic person since 10years. I can't live a day without drink any alcohol. How can I leave this thing?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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If you think that you will find it very difficult, then admit yourself to a hospital and go for de-addiction: which normally lasts for about two weeks. Then follow that up with addiction counseling from a professional for at least three years to completely get rid of the habit. If this is also not enough, then admit yourself into a de-addiction center and stay there for at least 6 months and after that attend counseling with a professional. There are medicines that help with the drinking just to ease the initial craving, called antabuse. It has to be taken regularly and even a minor consumption of alcohol (like in cough syrups), accidentally or otherwise, will lead to reactions, sometimes requiring hospitalization. Ultimately, it is your will power and the support that you receive from the medical fraternity and your close and dear ones. You must also learn to substitute and deal with the oral need, a rigid value system, the script issue, and of course look at all the genetic factors to plan a strategy not to get into what is called ‘cross addictions’ i.e. another form of addiction that may appear alright but is in fact as bad as the primary addiction. The center or hospital and the counselor will advise and guide you on several measures and precautions you will need to take to stay with your resolve. Even after the rehabilitation you must attend AA meetings and continue this support for a long time. Your family will also need to attend some sessions and go for Al-anon meetings for their co-dependency issues. You cannot be treated in isolation because the family has gotten used to your drinking and have made some unhealthy adaptations to somehow cope. Your children will also have to attend meetings to work out their issues because of your habit. In fact, they are all suffering from the Adult Children Of Alcoholics Syndrome (ACOAs), which in effect means that they are genetically predisposed to alcoholism or can have cross addiction problems and they will have similar traits of the abusing alcoholic but in a milder form. There are special support groups for them all over the world. Should they touch or indulge in alcohol or any addictive substances or behaviors, they could also become full-fledged addicts themselves. Make a serious plan with the wife and children and whoever else’s support you can get and act on it fast.
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My question is when I AM IN Period time SO I AM VERY anger & HIT FAMILY MEMBER & throw it all & my problem is last 15 year SO any solution ya tablets.

Advanced Skills in Counselling, BSIC, Advanced Trainee of Transactional Analysis, DCS, Hypnotherapist
Psychologist
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You seem to be going through hormonal imbalance due to which anger is more. Firstly, please see a gynaecologist for a check up and then meet a counsellor for anger management because I sense that you are having some stress and tension in your life which you are trying to manage by showing your anger. This might solve the problem initially or put it away for some time but in the longer run, you are damaging your own self esteem and close relationships. You will benefit from learning more amicableways of talking and putting across your points so that you don hurt other members. Counting upto 10 before talking generally helps to contain anger. Thinking about whether is it with fighting and spoiling my mood will help yu decide how important this matter to you is. Going away from the situation, cooling down by deep breathing and going through your reasons for getting angry. Before periods, please reduce junk food to the minimum. Exercise everyday so that you are feeling good about yourself and burnt off excess energy.

I am feeling depressed so I want to get over this so can you please help me In this.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda
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I am feeling depressed so I want to get over this so can you please help me In this.
Do some meditation. Read some healthy books. Use. Sarpgandha ghan vati 1. M. 1. N. 2 at night with milk.

I am a student My mood changes frequently. If ever I'm in a great mood suddenly gets worse mood. \

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist
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I am a student 
My mood changes frequently. If ever I'm in a great mood suddenly gets worse mood. \
Hi lybrate-user, mood swings, or rapid changes in one's emotional state, may occur as a reaction to circumstances or environment, as a result of a physical or mental health condition, or for no apparent reason. General moodiness is likely to be a part of everyone's life, but in some circumstances, changes in mood may be severe and have an effect on health and daily function. When rapid or frequent mood shifts seem to occur without a cause or when they affect one's behavior, well-being, or typical function, the support of a therapist or other mental health professional may be helpful. Mood swings are often associated with persistent expectations for bad things to happen or, in other words, negative thinking. For example, you might be waiting to hear back from a job and assume you didn't get it after only a day has passed. Or maybe your mother has informed you that she has something to tell you and you immediately assume that she's deathly ill. Not only is this kind of negative thinking often inaccurate, it can also dramatically affect your mood and lead you to feel very angry and upset, typically for little to no" real" reason.[1] there are two different tricks you can try for dealing with such unhealthy automatic thinking: take a step back and relax. Instead of assuming the worst that can happen, think about all of the other scenarios that are possible. This will help you realize that the worst is not likely to happen, and that there's no point in getting all upset until you know more information. Alternately, you could consider the worst possible scenario and prepare for it, just in case. By ensuring that you are well prepared for even the worst case scenario you can imagine, you might be able to focus your attention on something else instead of dwelling on the unpredictable consequences that could result from it. Secondly, overgeneralizing is another way that you may lead yourself into a bad mood. Maybe you had a bad interaction on a date or with a co-worker. So what? you may think this means that you'll never find love or that you're going to be fired, but you shouldn't let this one situation or conversation make you feel like it's indicative or determinant of other trends in your life. This kind of generalizing is bound to make you moody and upset, but there is a way to counteract it. Remind yourself that what happened was an isolated incident. Instead of assuming one incident (such as a disagreement with a coworker or date) is reflective of your entire relationship with this person, consider it as a one-off and something that doesn't happen very often. Remind yourself of all of the success you have had in this realm, whether it's your work life or your romantic life, and you'll be able to calm down a bit and realize that there's no need to get all worked up about it. Maintain a well balanced diet and exercise regularly. Consult a psychologist for mood monitoring.
1 person found this helpful

How to stop smoking ?Please suggest

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
Pediatrician
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Only by using strong will power and avoiding all situations where you feel like smoking, avoiding friends who smoke and diverting mind by reading or chewing a gum and taking a walk when you crave for a smoke can all help. You can chew nicorette gum which is nicotine replacement. There are medicines available. You can ask me privately.

My son doesnot concentarte while studying and that is why do not remember studies. Otherwise he is active and remember each minute things.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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Yes, his problem could be about concentration but let us not assume that he is not intelligent. That might be a huge fallacy: sometimes children who are too intelligent cannot concentrate because the material may be too boring or too mundane for his level. You may check his iq by testing and see if that is true. It is also possible that he is over active and might need more engaging things and activities around him. So you could give him supplementary work at home that is both challenging and interesting. He could also be given a lot of exercise to do by the play way method like, cycling, football, basketball, kids? games that involve running around etc. When he is exhausted he will be more amenable to concentrate. Do not feed him high energy foods. His father? s involvement will go a long way to mitigate these difficulties. In fact he may need a lot of attention, especially of the physical kind to be more balanced. Don't focus too much on his academic skills but on his overall development.
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I am 25 year old male, I am preparing for an exam but I can't really concentrate on studies.

M.A-Philosophy, Masters in Psychotherapy and Counselling, B.A.M.S
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Start mindfulness meditation five minutes daily sit comfortable feel touch of your breath going inside and outside after feeling one or two breaths mind will wandet because of thoughts when you realise that mind is not on breath, accept it and bring attention to breathe do it again and again for five minutes.
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I m very sick because of my negative thoughts and I continuously think about them

Post Graduate Diploma In Rehabilitation Psychology, M A Clinical Psychology
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Hi, I understand negative thoughts are difficult to deal with and you must be having a hard time fighting your negative thoughts which get more intense with time and it goes on in a loop. I want you to verbalize and write your negative thoughts in exactly the way you think it even if its very WEIRD! Discuss it in private conversation and I shall help you out. I need some more information. What is your age? Are you studying or working? Come back with answers. ALL THE BEST

Sir, Mai bahut paresan hu kyu ki mai kuch yaad karta hu to bhul jata hai mai kya karu kuch bataye?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
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Dear lybrate-user, welcome to lybrate. At your age, memory problems like amnesia, dementia or alzheimer's are not common. Many young people do complain having problems with memory. These problems are due to either they are too busy or due to anxiety and stress. Busy people use organizers or employ a personal assistant because they can't remember every task. You need to understand this. If you still say, you are having memory problems, we need to check your memory using memory test. Take care.
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