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Dr. Shivaji Bhattacharya

Veterinarian, Kolkata

Dr. Shivaji Bhattacharya Veterinarian, Kolkata
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Shivaji Bhattacharya
Dr. Shivaji Bhattacharya is a trusted Veterinarian in 24 Parganas, Kolkata. He is currently associated with Dr. Sivaji Bhattacharya's Clinic in 24 Parganas, Kolkata. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Shivaji Bhattacharya on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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B-501, Uditee Apartments, AE-41/1, Hanapara, P.O. Kesthopur, KolkataKolkata Get Directions
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Sir/mam, my dog (5 years old) is suffering with urine problem, i.e. He urinates but dropwise. He is otherwise active n takes meals properly There is no pain in stomach on pressing. Few days back he ate the whole small pack of pedigree and after that this happened. I gave him dexona n now giving norflox400. Pls help.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot
You give full of water as your dog want. It may be due to acidic urine so I advise routine urine test then consult the doctor.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
12 people found this helpful

I was bitten by my pet dog near my mouth, I did not got vaccinated after bitten by my dog, bt my dog has been vaccinated, so do I still have a chance of getting infected by rabies?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Normally if your pet dog is vaccinated, then no need to for vaccination. You have to make sure your pet dog is vaccinated in last one year.
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How to treat scabies in dogs?

MVSc
Veterinarian,
U hv to apply antibacterial and antifungal lotion on patch and bathe with same shampoo and apply anti mite sol once a weekly and orally also give antibiotic and antihistamines according to lesions severity.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

My dog has a lump near the hips since 2 months .What could possibly be done ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
May be outgrowth or cancer . what is his age and please explain in details about the consistency of the mass
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My rottweiler is 12 months old and he is shedding heavily. What should I do for him.

master of veterinary science
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Brushing vigorously to remove old hairs and add some fur tonics like nutricoat advance or etc, wait for 15 to 20 days for replacement of old coat.
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My dog, a mix of labra and pomerian, getting a lot of hair fall from last 2-3 days. She has recently recovered from fever and stomach infection. She was given bath 2 days back and since then a lot of hair fall althouh hair fall was before this bath also but not much.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
I think it has combined affect of winter shedding and also the skin infection, so please go for omega 3, 6 fatty acids supplement and if not recovered on 15 days pls consult an vet near by.
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My dog is suffering from lipomas. And due to his health he cannot be operated. So what should I do to save my dog? Please advise.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
It is better if you can get it operated. Normally they are painless. You can consult with homeopathy doctor for some medicinal treatment.
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I was attacked by dog on 28/3/15, luckily there was no cut on my body. But I came to know there was small spit on my hand. As doctor diagnose me and advised me injection. Same day took vaxirab and second I took 2/4/15 and third I took on 7/4/15. I know the further step and how many more injection I have to take ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dear sir, as far as the dog is a street dog you need to worry. In this case even thought the dog is a street dog it does not seems to be bitten case as you dint have any injury or cut wound. To get rabies you need to be: 1. Have a cut wound first then rabies dog saliva has to be in contact with the wound. 2. Have to watch the dog for 30 days. Because the rabies dog cannot survive more than 45 days. 3. Rabies is a viral diseases so it needs a proper contact with the infection wild rabid carnivores. (like hiv infection) 4. So in your cases what you have done is more than enough.
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My dog. Labrador. 5 yrs old has thyroid. He is been told to have thyroxine sodium tablet. 100mg everyday in the morning empty stomach. Is the medication fine for him. Please let me know.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
The treatment for hypothyroidism advised to your pet is alright. The protocol for treating such patients vary according to the condition of the pet, requirement of dose depending on the test reports and its clinical manifestation. So it is not possible to give any advice without examining the patient and its blood reports. Better have an opinion from nearby vet after examination only. Thank you.
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My dog bites everytime what can i do ?

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian,
If you're having a puppy then this is completely normal. Just provide adequate calcium supplementation along with chewsticks to reduce reduce the chewing vigor. Thank you.
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My rabbit suffer in fever from yesterday.What is the treatment of rabbit fever? plz reply

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use paracetamol 125 mg oral baby suspension 2-3 ml thrice daily with vitamin tonic as a supportive therapy
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I have a doberman puppy. It's 5 weeks old and I need amputation and ear cropping done. Ear cropping needs to take place within a few weeks. I there any decent vet surgeon that I can approach.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
As the cropping of ear and tail docking is banned in india so I suggest you not to go for it. This is a illegal practice and should not be performed. Ad when you go for cropping etc you will not able to participate in any dog show.
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B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
Be aware of dust and heat . Give cold water to breeds of cold areas also they need air-conditioning .
Deworm with ivermectin ( adults ) consult your vet for dosage . Ivermectin works on internal as well as exetrnal para sites :) . May yours pets live an itch free summers this time
5 people found this helpful

My kitten abscess wound has got maggots in her. She is 3 months old how to kill maggots at home.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Please apply maggout spray on the wound. And take it to a vet. As it may require wound dressing and antibiotic injection also. After wards you can dress it at home itself and also oral medicines.
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I have recently pick up one month old dog from road side. What are diagnose like injection or vaccination it require.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
45 days vaccinate with parvo, distemper, and corona 9in one vaccine. 60th day same booster above 90 days booster after six months rabies booster deworming monthly one for 6 months and then 3 months once these are the shedules.
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My dog has been tiered and it desiase is vommeting, loose motion, fever. What is medical advice.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You can show him to vet, seems severe gastro intestinal trouble. Continous vomiting and diarrhea leads to dehydration
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I have a pet dog who is 2 years 6 months old. 1 year back he got hit by stick in his balls. It cnt walk properly now he keep his back leg folded, we do takes nerobian tablets very freguently but now a day even after taking tablets he do not get well. So please help me out with some medicine and advise.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Kindly get him assessed by a vet nearby. Explore possibility of any fresh trauma/injury which is causing folded back leg. You may need radiographs to confirm any arthritis or bone lesions. Take care.
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