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Dr. Ritinkar Datta

Veterinarian, Kolkata

Dr. Ritinkar Datta Veterinarian, Kolkata
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To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Ritinkar Datta
Dr. Ritinkar Datta is an experienced Veterinarian in Garia, Kolkata. You can visit him at Dr. Dutta;s Veterinary in Garia, Kolkata. Book an appointment online with Dr. Ritinkar Datta and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dr. Dutta;s Veterinary

R-40, Kamdhari Garia, KolkataKolkata Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Hi, have a pet (dashing dog). Having itching, dandruff and hairfall problem from last 5 months. We tried all remedies like using neem oil massage, ridd etc but no use. Please suggest home remedies to cure immediately. Thanks.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear karthik, please go through following treatment for better result 1. Inj. Hitek 0.5 ml s/c and apply himax tube in local effectted area.
2 people found this helpful
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My dog is 5 years old she is not eating from last 3 days whatever she eats she vomit back. What to do? Went to a Dr. he said that she's is suffering from gastrointestinal infection today he provided drip and don't know which medicine but my pet is not eating anything and she is very lethargic right now. I'm worried. Yesterday she had a fever of 104°C but today no fever was there.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
please follow up the regular ceck up to the vet it may be from as simple as gastrointestinal infection to forieng body in stomach , please take a xray and scan to identityfy the things ......
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Mere dog ko kafi khujli Ho thi hai or uske puri body par red nissan ho gaye hai meine uske body or red liquid dawai bhi Lagai thi par firse Ho gaye hai.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Medicated shampoos weekly injection course right food application of medicines on body plus tablets will be given as per the situatuon. Go to a vet
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Hello sir I have a black labrador his age is 6 month I dn't no which a reason whats a problem his hair be a white neck hair and other he is a puppy pls help me suggest a treatment if as possible as soon as.

Veterinarian, Bhopal
It is generally a genetic factor. But some times may be due to deficiency of nutrition. You may give dewormer and nutritional diet.
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These's been a lot of hair loss in my dog I have been using petglow tonic from a couple of days but there's no improvement.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please continue with any tonic which contain omega 3 and 6 oil at least for a month and see for the results they all can't produce results in hours. Sir need to wait./// as the damage caused took so much time to disintegrate the skin and you need same or twice time to repair it.
4 people found this helpful
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I have a 13 years old pomeranian bitch. She had stopped eating since a few weeks. On getting her blood tested and sonography, reports say that her kidney is weak and urea level is high. What should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., MVSc Pathology
Veterinarian, Bangalore
With the age the dogs kidney starts losing its functional ability. So now all you have to do is managemental and supportive therapy. Changes in the feed like giving renal diet and phosphate binders has to be followed. If the dog is still not taking food, better to go for fluid therapy.
1 person found this helpful
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Why Do People Torture Animals

MSc, PGDGC
Psychologist, Chennai
Why Do People Torture Animals

Why do people/student torture animals- what drives them?
Can we analaysis and find solution: let try to stop this any more in our life
As we all aware that two animals cruelty incidents happened in tamilnadu, one with the dog and another with an monkey.
Case a, 12 yrs old kid hitting cat with broomstick, their parents brought for an counseling that he has not coutesy for animal and he was killing without any guilt.
Case b, 23 yrs adult was burning a rat alive with kerosine and feeling happy to see that rat die with burn.
And there are many cases which were not recorded and submitted for case discussion.
What typically possesses them to inflict such acts of intentional animal torture and cruelty? 
These are because of psychological disorders (such as anti-social/psychopathic personality disorders and engage in deliberate acts of zoosadism), and/or because they have sexually paraphilic disorders (such as crush fetishism in which small animals are crushed for sexual pleasure). 
This may be common behaviour among murderers and rapists - those with psychopathic traits characterized by impulsivity, selfishness, and lack of remorse.
Animal torture and cruelty is one of the three adolescent behaviours in what is often referred to the homicidal triad , the other two being persistent bedwetting and obsessive fire-setting. The combination of two or more of these three behaviours increases the risk of homicidal behaviour in adult life.
The behaviours in the homicidal triad are often associated with parental abuse, parental brutality (and witnessing domestic violence), and/or parental neglect.
What we can do:
The best way to prevent it is teaching by example. Parents and teachers are the key and plays very important role.
Pro-social behaviour (action/behaviours intended to help others) by parents and other role models towards animals, such as rescuing spiders in the bath, feeding birds/ants, treating pets as a member of the family, 
Schools and colleges can have some pet home in the campus.
These activities or act has the potential to make a positive lasting impression on children.
It's a start, lets all have at least one pet in the home make your son/ daughter to take care of them (pet therapy).

Regards:
Elayaraja m. Sc, m. Phil, pgdgc, pgdha
Counseling psychologist,
Kavithalyaa counseling centre, ambattur, chennai-53.

8 people found this helpful

I have a 4 months labrador and now a days he is shedding hairs very much. Please suggest me any medicine to control shedding.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Shedding of hair have lot of reasons, but if there is no infection and only shedding then you should use syrup containing omega 3 fatty acid which prevent hair fall like vitabest or glossy coat. Dose as per wt. Mentioned on bottle.
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Sir my pet dog just ate a lizard and vomited all it ate, sir he is only 2 months old and I heard that it is very harmful for them, sir pls aay what can I do to help my pet?

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
If your dog has vomited it is fine, no botheration, our domestic lizards are harmless,& cats eat them & even some human beings also do eat that I have noted it does not matter any thing to your dog, be tension free, of course there are poisonous lizards also, even after eating the contents should go to blood to see the symptoms, if your dog has lose motion, give antimalarial medicines, do not worry,
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Dr. I have adopted new puppy I have noticed insects due to it. Is it danger for him It yes how can I get rid of those insects etc.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, insects due to it or insects on it. If insects (ticks or lice) on it, you can use NOTIX powder to apply on its body and just leave. Ticks will be reduced.
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My dog is 5 years old and it is a street dog, he is suffering from cough from last one week. Please Suggest can we give him some cough syrup?

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Hello, As your pet is suffering from cough, i'll suggest you to get him checked by nearby vet and also a xray examination. This will help you to know the exact reason for coughing. As their are many etiological factors for coughing, only symptomatic treatment with cough syrup is not advisable. So get a proper advice from a vet after complete examination of your pet. Hope this information is helpful for you. Thank you.
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Hi my male gsd has turned 1 this April and I want to nueter him also he has developed umbilical hernia, both the operations at same time now is it okay for my dogs health?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
ye it is better to opeate two thing in on ananesthesia so animal is not under anaesthesia twice if proper care is taken then both wound will heal nicely and dog is free of pain for life
1 person found this helpful
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Pet scan report says that it is hodgkins lymphoma stage 2 suggest me for what can I do?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Hodgkins lymphoma can be treated with chemotherapy. But in most of the cases their are remission of lymphoma. Normal survival rate of dog is 6 month to 1 year.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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Within last three months My cat gave birth to too many kittens. And I came to know that to avoid this spaying is the solution. So I want to know that is there any problem after spaying a cat and how much it cost?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, yes spaying is right option for your cat. It will not give birth afterwards. There will not be problem if surgery is successfull. The cost of surgery depends on ypur area doctor.
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I have a female labra 2 years old of normal dimensions. She got crossed with a street dog and I do not want her to bear any puppies suggest me the most appropriate pill.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Dear lybrate-user in case you want to avoid puppies this time few hormonal drugs are available in case you do not want your labra o have puppies in life please getbher operated. This will save you from hessle of care during heat and reduce the chances of mammary tumor.
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Hi , i have a dog age 5 Yrs .Lab . His hair shedding alot and its almost gone near genitalia .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please consult a vet it might because of skin infection or else send me photos so could suggest first aid . Still consulting a vet near by is appreciable.
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