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Dr. Neena Ghose

Pediatrician, Kolkata

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Dr. Neena Ghose Pediatrician, Kolkata
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Neena Ghose
Dr. Neena Ghose is a renowned Pediatrician in Rash Behari Avenue, Kolkata. She is currently associated with Medinova Diagnostic Center in Rash Behari Avenue, Kolkata. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Neena Ghose on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Pediatricians from across India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Kolkata and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Medinova Diagnostic Center

#1, Sarat Chatterjee Avenue, Rash Behari Avenue, Lake Gardens. Landmark: Opposite Ravindra Sarobar Stadium, KolkataKolkata Get Directions
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Birthmarks In Infants!

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Birthmarks In Infants!

Birthmarks in Infants

A baby's skin coloring can vary greatly, depending on the baby's age, race or ethnic group, temperature, and whether or not the baby is crying. Skin color in babies often changes with both the environment and health. Some of these differences are just temporary. Others, such as certain birthmarks, may be permanent.

What are birthmarks?

Birthmarks are areas of discolored and/or raised skin that are present at birth or within a few weeks of birth. Birthmarks are made up of abnormal pigment cells or blood vessels.

Although the cause of birthmarks is not known, most of them are harmless and do not require treatment. Babies with birthmarks should be examined by your child's health care provider, especially if they are:

  • Located in the middle of the back, along the spine (may be related to spinal cord problems)
  • Large birthmarks on the face, head or neck
  • Interfering with movement of activity, for example a birthmark on the eyelid that may interfere with vision

Some common birthmarks include:

  • Stork bites
  • Angel kisses
  • Salmon patches

These are small pink or red patches often found on a baby's eyelids, between the eyes, upper lip, and back of the neck. The "stork bite" name comes from the marks on the back of the neck where, as the myth goes, a stork may have picked up the baby. They are caused by a concentration of immature blood vessels and may be the most visible when the baby is crying. Most of these fade and disappear completely.

Congenital dermal melanocytosis (also known as Mongolian spots)

Congenital dermal melanocytosis refers to areas of blue or purple-colored, typically on the baby's lower back and buttocks. These can occur in darker-skinned babies of all races. The spots are caused by a concentration of pigmented cells. They usually disappear in the first 4 years of life.

Strawberry hemangioma

This is a bright or dark red, raised or swollen, bumpy area that looks like a strawberry. Hemangiomas are formed by a concentration of tiny, immature blood vessels. Most of these occur on the head. They may not appear at birth, but often develop in the first 2 months. Strawberry hemangiomas are more common in premature babies and in girls. These birthmarks often grow in size for several months, and then gradually begin to fade. They may bleed or get infected in rare cases. Nearly all strawberry hemangiomas completely disappear by 9 years of age.

Port-wine stain

A port-wine stain is a flat, pink, red, or purple colored birthmark. These are caused by a concentration of dilated tiny blood vessels called capillaries. They usually occur on the head or neck. They may be small, or they may cover large areas of the body. Port-wine stains do not change color when gently pressed and do not disappear over time. They may become darker and thicker when the child is older or as an adult. Port-wine stains on the face may be associated with more serious problems. Skin-colored cosmetics may be used to cover small port-wine stains. The most effective way of treating port-wine stains is with a special type of laser. This is done when the baby is older by a plastic surgery specialist.

Congenital moles

These common moles (less than 3 inches in diameter) occur in about 1 out of every 100 newborns. They increase in size as the child grows, but usually don't cause any problems. Your child's health care provider will watch them closely as rarely they can develop into a cancerous mole.

 

Hi sir. I have a 6 months baby girl. I have done all the types of vaccination which is mentioned in child doctors file. But I have an doubt that the vaccine of phnemonia is necessary to give to child or not in indian whether ?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Tumkur
Hi sir. I have a 6 months baby girl. I have done all the types of vaccination which is mentioned in child doctors fil...
If money isn't the criteria you must go for all the vaccines. Pneumococcal vaccine will protect against invasive pneumococcal diseases like pneumonia, meningitis etc. After 6 months only 2doses are enough with a booster at 15 months.
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My 3 months old baby is doing potty 3-4 time in these days. His potty is very green and watery. From two days he has jukam and khasi. What should I do?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Jaipur
My 3 months old baby is doing potty 3-4 time in these days. His potty is very green and watery. From two days he has ...
Just continue exclusive breast feeding, if his urine output is less give fluids frequently with breast feed.
3 people found this helpful
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I am a 26 year old mother. My daughter is 12 months old. Her birth weight was 3 kg and now she is 9 kg. Her birth length was 45 cm and now she is 73 cm. Head circumference was 32 cm at birth and now it is 42.3 cm. She started walking around 9 and half months. There has been no developmental delay, she has reached milestones little earlier than others infact. She is doing good, understands many things, points at things. She is friendly as well. My concern is that she has a very flat nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, slightly slanted eyes. I have slanted eyes too and so does my father. Her face is small and her teeth are also somewhat odd. She has 6 teeth as of now. The upper jaw looks like it is pulled back, the lower jaw is more in the front and the upper jaw is backwards. I am very worried about many things right now. She is my first born. Please advise.

BDS, MDS
Dentist, Gorakhpur
I am a 26 year old mother. My daughter is 12 months old. Her birth weight was 3 kg and now she is 9 kg. Her birth len...
Your concern is very much desirable. She seems to be alright as many features you told coincides with parental features. If you feel/ suspect any syndromic/ developmental errors in her growth please take her to a qualified pediatrician in your area. We can not guess without having a look on her body structures. There are many syndromes with overlapping features you told which has to be diagnosed properly. You can send a close picture of her face, your face and her father also if you need a better opinion regarding this. We can co- relate with any familial abnormality running in generations.
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My daughter is 1.6 years old, having small pox on 31-05-2015 is there any solution.

Pediatrician, Pune
It could be chicken pox, self limiting viral infection, ensure that the child gets adequate rest and maintain a good hygiene the lesions can get secondarily infected
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Any advances in treatment of psoriasis? for 2 years on 3x/week dialysis following pneumonia. How can I revover from ckd 5?

M B B S, M. D (Internal Medicine)
General Physician, Nellore
Cure for ckd stage 5 is renal transplant. Regarding psoriasis treatment, monoclonal antibodies are being tried now.
2 people found this helpful

My one year 5 month old daughter is passing stools 3 times a day. 2 times normal consistency and one time liquid. Is it normal? She is underweight too n has lack of immunity as she falls sick every once or twice in month. Please suggest any healthy diet.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Ludhiana
My one year 5 month old daughter is passing stools 3 times a day. 2 times normal consistency and one time liquid. Is ...
Myself i ahomoeopath and actually the problem is frequent medicines.As said that she is frequently sick and so she requires medicines but it is the other way around.She is on frequent medicines,which leads weak immunity and thus frequent infections.I will sugget you to start following homoeopathic medicines and give her good healthy home diet,nothing special. Homoeopathic medicine MUNOSTIM ( Wilmar Schwabe India) Chew 4 tab twice daily NUX VOMICA 30 ( Dr Reckeweg) drink 1 drop in 1spoon fresh water once every night for 5 days.
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I have a 3 months old daughter who is completely on breastfeed. I am suffering from cold. Can I take medicine like coldact? Will it affect my baby?

Masters in Food and Nutrition, Certified Diabetic Educator
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Kolar
No it will not effect your baby. However keep yourself and the baby warm. Consume milk with turmeric powder, as it has good medicinal properties and will cure your cold soon. Further it strengthens your immunity to fight against infection.
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My 3 year old son had his blood test done on 3/12/2017. His biochemistry values show increase Ck (C P K - TOTAL)(Method: Kinetic/ IFCC) of about 253.3 U/L. Is this a normal value?

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
My 3 year old son had his blood test done on 3/12/2017. His biochemistry values show increase Ck (C P K - TOTAL)(Meth...
In a healthy adult, the CPK level in the blood serum varies with a number of factors (gender, race and activity), but normal range is 22 to 198 U/L (units per liter). Higher amounts of serum CPK can indicate muscle damage from chronic disease or acute muscle injury.
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Dyslexia - What To Know About It?

B.A. Hons . Psychology, MA Psychological Counseling, EDM Psychological Counseling, Trauma Specialist, MPhil Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Hyderabad
Dyslexia - What To Know About It?

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  • Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten
  • Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet
  • Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make
  • Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat
  • Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'
  • Has difficulty learning new words
  • Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age
  • Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences
  • Has trouble rhyming

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School-

  • Struggles with reading and spelling
  • Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'
  • Has trouble remembering facts and numbers
  • Has difficulty gripping a pencil
  • Has difficulty using proper grammar
  • Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization
  • Gets tripped up by word problems in math
  • Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words
  • Has trouble following a sequence of directions

Warning Signs in High School-

  • Struggles with reading out loud
  • Doesn't read at the expected grade level
  • Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms
  • Has difficulty organizing and managing time
  • Struggles to summarize a story
  • Has difficulty learning a foreign language

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia-

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:

General:

  • Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.
  • Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."
  • Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.
  • High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.
  • Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.
  • Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.
  • Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.
  • Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."
  • Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  • Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.
  • Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.
  • Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.
  • Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.
  • Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.
  • Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  • Spells phonetically and inconsistently.
  • Hearing and Speech Skills
  • Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.
  • Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.

Writing and Motor Skills:

  • Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.
  • Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.
  • Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.
  • Math and Time Management Skills
  • Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.
  • Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.
  • Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.
  • Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.

Memory and Cognition:

  • Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.
  • Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.
  • Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).
  • Behavior, Health, Development and Personality
  • Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.
  • Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.
  • Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).
  • Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.
  • Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.
  • Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.
  • Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  • Read out loud every day
  • Tap into your child's interests
  • Use audiobooks
  • Look for apps and other high-tech help
  • Focus on effort, not outcome
  • Make your home reader-friendly
  • Boost confidence

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  • Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.
  • Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.
  • Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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