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Desun Hospital and Heart Institute, Kolkata

Desun Hospital and Heart Institute

  4.5  (18 ratings)

Cardiologist Clinic

Desun More, Kasba Golpark, EM Bypass, Kolkata Kolkata
1 Doctor · ₹1000
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Desun Hospital and Heart Institute   4.5  (18 ratings) Cardiologist Clinic Desun More, Kasba Golpark, EM Bypass, Kolkata Kolkata
1 Doctor · ₹1000
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About

It is important to us that you feel comfortable while visiting our office. To achieve this goal, we have staffed our office with caring people who will answer your questions and help you ......more
It is important to us that you feel comfortable while visiting our office. To achieve this goal, we have staffed our office with caring people who will answer your questions and help you understand your treatments.
More about Desun Hospital and Heart Institute
Desun Hospital and Heart Institute is known for housing experienced Cardiologists. Dr. Sanjib Patra, a well-reputed Cardiologist, practices in Kolkata. Visit this medical health centre for Cardiologists recommended by 44 patients.

Timings

MON-FRI
11:30 AM - 02:00 PM

Location

Desun More, Kasba Golpark, EM Bypass, Kolkata
Kasba Kolkata, West Bengal - 700107
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Doctor in Desun Hospital and Heart Institute

Dr. Sanjib Patra

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist
Get ₹125 cashback on this appointment (No Booking Fee)
90%  (18 ratings)
22 Years experience
1000 at clinic
₹300 online
Available today
11:30 AM - 02:00 PM
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Heart Transplant - What To Know?

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Heart Transplant - What To Know?

A heart transplant is an operation in which a failing, diseased heart is replaced with a healthier, donor heart. Heart transplant is a treatment that's usually reserved for people who have tried medications or other surgeries, but their conditions haven't sufficiently improved.

While a heart transplant is a major operation, your chance of survival is good, with appropriate follow-up care.

When faced with a decision about having a heart transplant, know what to expect of the heart transplant process, the surgery itself, potential risks and follow-up care.

Why it's done

Heart transplants are performed when other treatments for heart problems haven't worked, leading to heart failure. In adults, heart failure can be caused by several conditions, including:

  1. A weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy)
  2. Coronary artery disease
  3. Heart valve disease
  4. A heart problem you're born with (congenital heart defect)
  5. Dangerous recurring abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias) not controlled by other treatments
  6. Amyloidosis
  7. Failure of a previous heart transplant
  8. In children, heart failure is most often caused by either a congenital heart defect or a cardiomyopathy.

Another organ transplant may be performed at the same time as a heart transplant (multiorgan transplant) in people with certain conditions at select medical centers. Multiorgan transplants include:

  1. Heart-kidney transplant. This procedure may be an option for some people with kidney failure in addition to heart failure.
  2. Heart-liver transplant. This procedure may be an option for people with certain liver and heart conditions.
  3. Heart-lung transplant. Rarely, doctors may suggest this procedure for some people with severe lung and heart diseases, if the conditions aren't able to be treated by only a heart transplant or lung transplant.

Factors that may affect your eligibility for a heart transplant

A heart transplant isn't the right treatment for everyone. Certain factors may mean you're not a good candidate for a heart transplant. While each case is considered individually by a transplant center, a heart transplant may not be appropriate if you:

  1. Are an advanced age that would interfere with the ability to recover from transplant surgery
  2. Have another medical condition that could shorten your life, regardless of receiving a donor heart, such as a serious kidney, liver or lung disease
  3. Have an active infection
  4. Have a recent personal medical history of cancer
  5. Are unwilling or unable to make lifestyle changes necessary to keep your donor heart healthy, such as not drinking alcohol or not smoking

What happens after the transplant?

Most people leave hospital within about four weeks of the operation, but depending on your condition, you may need to stay in hospital for longer.

In the first few months after your surgery you will need to spend a lot of time visiting the hospital – you might even need to stay near the transplant centre. Your transplant team will talk to you about practical arrangements for after your surgery.

Although you will be weak after the operation, recovery can be very quick. It is important to build up your level of activity gradually. You should avoid activities involving lifting and pushing until your breastbone is fully healed, which can take up to three or four months.

Once you feel fit and able, you can start doing things like light vacuuming or light gardening.

2003 people found this helpful

How To Prevent and Control Coronary Artery Disease?

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
How To Prevent and Control Coronary Artery Disease?

The heart pumps pure blood to all parts of the body through a network of arteries. These are thicker in the beginning and become finer and thinner as they reach the various organs. These arteries are lined by a layer of epithelial tissues and as blood flows through them, the heavier cholesterol / fat molecules settle down along the walls.

This attracts more and more fat molecules to settle down.  This is known as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Over a period of time, the vessels circumference reduces and the blood supply to the target organ reduces. This impacts proper functioning of these organs and when this happens to the major organs like the heart, kidney or the brain, conditions like stroke or thrombosis or heart attack can occur.

This condition, known as coronary artery disease, is becoming a major cause of deaths.  While that is the bad news, the good news is that it is largely lifestyle dependent, and if steps are taken, it can be prevented, and in the early stages, the damage completely reversed.

Preventive measures:

1. Diet: A low-fat, high-fiber, heart-healthy diet consisting of Omega-3 fatty acids is recommended by doctors, especially to people who are prone to develop heart disease.  This also requires reduced salt, increased unsaturated fats, reduced triglycerides and reduced sugar.  Include loads of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds and fish oils. Include multivitamins or other supplements after checking with your doctor.

2. Exercise:  Regular exercise in any form increases the efficiency of the circulatory system, keeps the cholesterol levels in check and helps in blood pressure management.  Exercise in any form is advisable, based on individual preference. A moderate physical activity of 30 to 45 minutes per day is advisable.

3. Smoking: This is one of the major risk factors for smoking, and quitting or controlling smoking is one of the best methods to prevent coronary artery disease.

4. Alcohol consumption:  While moderate alcohol consumption is believed to be healthy for the heart, excessive alcohol consumption is a strict no-no.  Binge drinking especially is shown to cause heart attacks.

5. Weight management: Check with your doctor on what is ideal BMI for you and work out a plan to keep your weight under check.

6. Regular medications: If you are on blood pressure or diabetes medications, ensure you do not miss them.  Keep a constant check to ensure your readings are managed well.

7. Watch out:  Ask your doctor if there are specific symptoms that you need to watch out and seek medical support if you see any of them.

Coronary disease is not treatable fully, but can be prevented and managed effectively to improve the overall quality of life.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1862 people found this helpful

How To Live After A Heart Attack - Changes To Your Lifestyle!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
How To Live After A Heart Attack - Changes To Your Lifestyle!

A heart attack allows you to get a double take on life. Once you survive it, you tend to realize how close your brush with death has been and how important your lifestyle choices can be. Most people go on to live a productive life after a heart attack provided they can adhere to making healthy choices. Here's what you can do if you have experienced your first attack and want to change for the better:

  1. Start at the hospital: A person usually stays in the hospital for 3 days after an attack to monitor their condition. This duration increases if you have complications that involve procedures like a bypass surgery. Your first significant change will come to your medication routine. Your existing dosages may be adjusted and you'll possibly prescribed newer medicines that will treat and control your symptoms. You'll not only need to know the names of all your medicines but when you have to take them. Its best you know exactly why are taking each of them, if there are other more economic alternatives since this may last a lifetime and what side effects they may have.
  2. Maintaining your mental health: Once bitten, twice shy applies for heart attack victims too. Not only do they live in a constant worry about another attack, every small symptom like a harmless muscle pull can trigger the fear factor. You also get into the "heart patient" dependent mode based on how much help you need to recover. Check for support groups and other heart attack survivors in your locality to see how they are coping. Read more about your recovery and try to keep a positive frame of mind.
  3. Go for cardiac rehab: Many hospitals have a rehabilitation program that you can participate in as an outpatient or you can go to a clinic that specializes in it. Such programs help speed up your recovery. It is run by people who will hand hold you in bringing positive changes in your life to protect and strengthen your heart. You'll learn activities that positively improve heart functions and reduce your chances of developing complications or dying from heart disease. You'll also benefit from exercises that'll be taught by a certified exercise specialist. 
  4. Making lifestyle changes: Quitting smoking is an obvious one. You'll now have to lead a more active lifestyle with daily exercise. You'll also need to actively manage your diabetes and obesity. None of these changes can happen in a day. In fact, behavioural scientists suggest that you need to practice a new activity continuously for twenty one days for it to become a habit. 

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1969 people found this helpful

Signs Of A Heart Attack!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Signs Of A Heart Attack!

With recent lifestyle changes, more and more people, younger in age, are falling prey to heart attacks. While some silently suffer the attack during their sleep and never wake up, others have symptoms which they dismiss as acidity or muscular pain and ignore them. There are multiple media programs that are trying to create awareness about how to identify a heart attack. If done at the right time, there is a good chance that the person can be saved.

What is a Heart Attack?

The blood vessels gradually narrow, reducing the blood flow to the target organs. This reduces the efficiency of the target organ, and if this happens to be the heart, it is known as a heart attack. The area that should ideally receive blood does not, leading to its “death.” If the damage is not severe, it can be reversed. However, if this attack happens in one of the critical areas of the heart, it can even be fatal.

Symptoms To Watch For: Very few attacks happen suddenly. Most start slowly and progress, and if identified on time, a life can be saved. The episode takes about an hour, and if you are well-versed with the symptoms, it could help identify the condition correctly and save a life. Most people use antacids and muscle relaxants to ease the situation, which does provide immediate relief, but not a proper cure.

  1. Chest discomfort: There is a central pain which is constant, nagging, and has a squeezing like sensation. This causes discomfort and most often, this pain is in the center of the chest area, which lasts for just a few minutes. Sometimes the pain can go and come back. This pain radiates down into the arm, up into the neck area, and also into the jaw and is almost always indicative of a heart attack.

  2. Short of breath: With chest pain, there is always shortness of breath which the person will experience. This is due to reduced oxygen levels in the body.

  3. Associated symptoms include fatigue, exhaustion, nausea, dizziness, light-headedness.

  4. There is almost always profused sweating where the person breaks into a cold sweat.

  5. If the attack happens during sleep, the person may be snoring and may feel as if something is choking his airway.

  6. Due to reduced return of blood from the peripheral organs, there could be swelling of the feet and ankles.

  7. Irregular heart beat: If there is irregular heart beat (palpitations) very often, talk to your doctor about it.

When you suspect a person of having a heart attack, check for these signs. Very often, a heart attack is detectable and can be managed with timely intervention.   

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1950 people found this helpful

5 Things to Do Daily to Keep Your Heart Healthy!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
5 Things to Do Daily to Keep Your Heart Healthy!

The heart is one part of your body that pumps blood relentlessly; to be grateful to the most important organ, it’s your duty to look after its health. Cardiovascular diseases and heart ailments can be prevented by making minor changes in your lifestyle.

Here are a few tips to keep your heart healthy:

  1. Add fiber to your dietMaking fiber a part of your regular diet is a great idea as the heart works best when it runs on natural fuel. You can achieve this by adding more raw fruits and vegetables in your meals as they are an excellent source of fiber and nutrients.
  2. Engage in physical activity: Your heart is a muscle and to make it healthier, you need some form of physical exercise. Engaging in cardiovascular forms of exercise for an hour daily keeps your heart in good condition. Engaging in physical activity also reduces the risk of getting a heart disease and acts as a stress buster.
  3. Cut down on the salt intake: The sodium content in salt disrupts the balance of fluids in your body leading to high blood pressure. This can affect the functioning of the heart; that is to pump blood, which is a major cause of a heart attack. So, cutting down on salt can reduce stress and the risks of heart attacks.
  4. Manage your weight: People on the overweight side run a risk of getting heart diseases more often than fit and leaner ones as they tend to be more inactive and sluggish. The heart diseases caused due to obesity can be avoided by making minor changes to your diet and exercising on a daily basis.
  5. Quit smokingIf you are a regular smoker, quitting is the best thing you can do for your heart. The main reason for coronary heart diseases is nicotine present in the cigarette. Once, you quit smoking completely, you will be 50% less likely to run the risks of a heart attack as compared to a regular smoker.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2715 people found this helpful

Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

A left ventricular assist device is an electromechanical device used in cases of advanced heart failure. In later stages of heart failure when the heart is weakened and no longer able to pump the necessary amount of blood, a left ventricular assist device can be surgically implanted to assist the heart’s functions.

A left ventricular assist device is often used as a short term solution and is different from a pacemaker, which is a long term cardiac assist device. The cases in which a left ventricular assist device is often used are:

  • As a temporary solution while a cardiac failure patient is on a transplant list or otherwise waiting for a heart transplant.
  • During recovery from cardiac surgery when the heart is not strong enough to function on its own. The device would soon be removed as the patient recovers.
  • During recovery from heart attacks

Having a left ventricular assist device implanted gives the heart time to rest and recover, leading you to the point where your heart can go back to functioning on its own. However, there are cases where a left ventricular assist device can be implanted as a long term solution. This treatment is called Destination Therapy and requires implanting a left ventricular assist device for several months or several years.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device works?
A Left Ventricular Assist Device can only be surgically implanted. It has both internal and external components with a pump attached to your heart and a controller on the outside of the body. The pump is attached to the heart with a tube that directs blood into the aorta. The pump and the controller are connected through a cable called the driveline. Since the Left Ventricular Assist Device is powered by electricity or batteries, a power source is also worn outside the body and is attached to the controller, powering both the controller and the pump.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device can affect your lifestyle?
Many people around the world have Left Ventricular Assist Devices implanted on both a temporary and permanent basis. While a person should be resting while recovering from a heart attack or cardiac surgery, it is possible to go about your normal daily life whilst having a Left Ventricular Assist Device implanted. While certain exercises and stress should be avoided when having a heart condition or when implanted with a Left Ventricular Assist Device, with carrying cases for power sources and controller that can operate from various different power sources, it is easy to live a normal productive life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2222 people found this helpful

Too Slow Heart Rate - Know The Reasons Behind It!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Too Slow Heart Rate - Know The Reasons Behind It!

The heart is a muscular organ and beats at regular intervals. This is known as heart rate, which indicates a person’s overall health. In a normal healthy individual, it ranges from 60 to 100 depending on overall health status. A heart rate outside of these ranges is usually a cause for concern.

Bradycardia is when the heart rate is below 60. While this could be a sign of fitness and health in some, it could also mean an underlying cardiac condition in others. Low heart rate is seen in many athletes, who normally have a heart rate below 60, with no symptoms or problems.

However, in others, slow heart rate can be an indication of an underlying heart problem. The electrical system in the heart could be affected, leading to alteration in blood supply to the heart and other vital organs. This needs further investigation and management to restore normal cardiac function.

Causes: Some of the reasons for reduced heart rate include:

  1. Normal aging process, as with all body functions, aging slows down the heart’s electrical function, leading to reduced heart rate
  2. Heart conditions like coronary artery disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart attack, and infections of the heart muscles (endocarditis or myocarditis)
  3. Pulmonary conditions like sleep apnea
  4. Hormonal conditions like hypothyroidism
  5. Metabolic conditions like increased potassium
  6. Increased iron accumulation in the body
  7. Medications like beta-blockers and digoxin

Symptoms: While bradycardia does not cause symptoms in some, in others, where it has an associated medical condition, the following would be seen too:

  1. Extreme levels of fatigue, with near-fainting episodes
  2. Regular bouts of dizziness
  3. Shortness of breath with even minimal activity
  4. Weakness, tiredness, and low energy levels
  5. Chest pain bouts
  6. Lack of mental energy and confusion
  7. Memory problems

Complications: If left untreated, bradycardia can cause:

  1. Fainting spells, where the patient may just collapse in the midst of an activity
  2. Heart failure, where the heart is not able to pump enough blood
  3. Sudden cardiac death

Risk factors: If you have any or some of the following, do not ignore bradycardia.

  1. Age (more common in older adults)
  2. Hypertension
  3. Diabetes
  4. Smoking
  5. Heavy alcohol abuse
  6. High levels of emotional stress

Treatment: Once diagnosis of bradycardia and underlying disease is confirmed, treatment will be two-pronged.

  1. Correct underlying condition like hypothyroidism, electrolyte imbalance and infections.
  2. Work on managing chronic conditions like coronary disease, diabetes, and obesity.
  3. Prepare the patient to watch for episodes of bradycardia and ways to manage them.

While bradycardia per se is not a concern, other conditions should be managed so the heart keeps working to its optimal level. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

3099 people found this helpful

Heart Problems - How Alcohol Can Worsen It?

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Heart Problems - How Alcohol Can Worsen It?

You must have heard this very often that drinking alcohol can lead to heart problems or even a heart attack, but you might not be sure how this is exactly explained. There is no doubt that consuming anything in excess can lead to serious health issues. Interestingly experts invariably mention that a drink or two every day keeps your heart healthy and can even prevent a stroke from occurring. So how does this gel with the conclusion that alcohol is not good for your heart? 

It starts with pre-existing conditions
Before one even considers this question of excessive alcohol consumption, the more critical issue is there are certain categories of people who should not go anywhere near a bottle of the liquor. These are:

  • Diabetics
  • Those with known conditions of high BP
  • People who have already suffered strokes or have heart-related issues
  • Those having high triglycerides and also
  • Those already consuming certain medications for any condition not related to above
  • You can add pregnant women to this as well as people who are already obese.

In the case of these people, the risk of alcohol consumption is high and as far as possible they should avoid drinking any alcoholic liquor. The difficulty that arises in most cases is people may not be aware that they could be carrying some of these conditions and they would be merrily enjoying their evening drinks or even a weekend binge. These could be quite dangerous for their health. In the last category listed above, alcohol might react adversely with some drugs and if the person is taking the drugs regularly, it puts him/her directly in the line of risk of a heart failure.

The effect of alcohol on your system
The chemistry part of this is explained that alcohol can directly impact the individual’s blood pressure. It tends to increase as the person keeps drinking over and over. Simultaneously there is an increase in certain fats in the bloodstream. Indirectly, this fat could lead to obesity and that could precipitate disorders like diabetes.

Apart from this, there is sufficient evidence to link excessive drinking to life-threatening diseases like cancer, peptic ulcers and serious deficiencies in the liver that can lead to fatality. So from every perspective, consumption of alcohol of any concentration, meaning whether it is beer or wine or the harder forms like whisky and rum, the risk to the heart is real and for those with prior conditions, the damage to the health could only get hastened. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2027 people found this helpful

Heart Attack - How To Live After It?

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Heart Attack - How To Live After It?

A heart attack makes you rethink and get a double take on life. Once you survive it, you tend to realize how close your brush with death has been and how important your lifestyle choices can be. Most people go on to live a productive life after a heart attack provided they can adhere to making healthy choices. Here's what you can do if you have experienced your first attack and want to change for the better:

  1. Start at the hospital: A person usually stays in the hospital for 3 days after an attack to monitor their condition. This duration increases if you have complications that involve procedures like a bypass surgery. Your first significant change will come in the form of your medication routine. Your existing dosage may be adjusted and you'll possibly be prescribed newer medicines that will treat and control your symptoms. You'll not only need to know the names of all your medicines, but when you have to take them. It's best you know exactly why you are taking each one of them, if there are other more economic alternatives since this may last a lifetime and what side effects they may have.
  2. Maintaining your mental health: Once bitten, twice shy applies for heart attack victims too. Not only do they live in a constant worry about another attack, every small symptom like a harmless muscle pull can trigger the fear factor. You also get into the "heart patient" dependent mode based on how much help you need to recover. Check for support groups and other heart attack survivors in your locality to see how they are coping. Read more about your recovery and try to keep a positive frame of mind.
  3. Go to a cardiac rehab: Many hospitals have a rehabilitation program that you can participate in as an outpatient or you can go to a clinic that specializes in it. Such programs help speed up your recovery. It is run by people who will hand hold you in bringing positive changes in your life to protect and strengthen your heart. You'll learn activities that positively improve heart functions and reduce your chances of developing complications or dying from heart disease. You'll also get benefit from exercises that'll be taught by a certified exercise specialist.
  4. Make a change in your lifestyle: Quit smoking that is an obvious one. You'll now have to lead a more active lifestyle with daily exercise. You'll also need to actively manage your diabetes and obesity. None of these changes can happen in a day. In fact, behavioral scientists suggest that you need to practice a new activity continuously for twenty one days for it to become a habit. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.
1933 people found this helpful

Living With a Heart Patient - 5 Things You Must Know!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Living With a Heart Patient - 5 Things You Must Know!

The heart is a muscle that pumps blood to the body through a network of arteries and veins controlled by valves. A heart disease could mean a problem in any of these organs, heart per se, the blood vessels, or the valves. Like it or not, heart problem is a chronic condition. It starts without any notice, and for sure, it is not going to go away completely. What can be done, though, is to manage it beautifully and lives and enjoy life so that the heart disease is not stopping you.

When there is a person with the chronic condition, it is not just that person who is affected, but the near and dear ones as well. When heading out for a dinner or when planning a gathering, there would be certain things that need to be accounted for and considered to accommodate the needs of the affected person. These very soon become a way of life and can be done effortlessly.

The following are some things to bear in mind when living with a heart patient.

  1. Diet: Heart patients would have some dietary preferences based on the heart condition per se. This may include a need for more whole grains and vegetables, need for specific types of oils, specific cooking methods, etc. At home, it is essential to ensure these things are always stocked up. When heading out, whether it is to visit someone or out for a meal, take into account whether these would be available. The next best option should be kept in mind so that dietary intake is not affected. Gradually, with time, substitutes can be identified with which they could manage in most places.
  2. Medications: Make sure the medication kit is always readily available. Make sure the person does not miss any medications, whether at home or outside. Ensure the regular medicines are in stock and some common emergency ones are also readily available.
  3. Routine: Whether it is their morning walk or yoga or meditation, it is better to stick to the routine as much as possible. The person also should learn to adapt based on circumstances; however, to the maximum extent possible, these should be continued without major interruption.
  4. Monitoring: Be it blood pressure, sugar levels or weight, these need to be monitored regularly and any deviations should be brought to the notice of the doctor immediately.
  5. Other equipment: Whether it is a walker, inhaler, or a wheelchair, these should be functional and available. The home or the living place should not be cluttered to allow for the easy use of this equipment.

While these may initially require some effort, with time, it would just happen naturally. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a cardiologist.

2260 people found this helpful
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