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Dr. Preeti

BDS

Dentist, Jaipur

18 Years Experience
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Dr. Preeti BDS Dentist, Jaipur
18 Years Experience
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Preeti
Dr. Preeti is a trusted Dentist in Shyam Nagar, Jaipur. She has been a practicing Dentist for 18 years. She studied and completed BDS . You can visit her at Mittal Dental Clinic in Shyam Nagar, Jaipur. Book an appointment online with Dr. Preeti and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dentists online in Jaipur and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
BDS - SMS Medical College, Jaipur - 2000
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

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Mittal Dental Clinic

105, Kings Road, Nirman Nagar, Adjacent to Shyam Nagar Police StationJaipur Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Hi Doctor I am having bleeding problem in my teeth and some swelling in gums also some smell will also come from a mouth due bleeding. Please advice me how I can take care of my teeth. Thank you.

BDS
Dentist, Vadodara
Hi Doctor I am having bleeding problem in my teeth and some swelling in gums also some smell will also come from a mo...
Go for scaling and polishing of teeth. It will help you solve your your bleeding and smell problem. For temporary solution, brush twice daily and use a mouthwash. Forcefully gargle with water after you eat or drink anything. Avoid sticky foods.
1 person found this helpful
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I am suffered pain of teeth for 6 months and try all types past but not get any result and checked my teeth ago 3 months after time not give any solution. Please, do you give about suggestions of my pain of teeth?.

BDS
Dentist, Raipur
I am suffered pain of teeth for 6 months and try all types past but not get any result and checked my teeth ago 3 mon...
Kindly get an x-ray done of the tooth having pain. May be you will have to get root canal treatment followed by a crown or cap. Till then you can take painkiller like tab ketorol dt 2 tablets dissolved in water. Brush your teeth twice daily using correct brushing technique.
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Sir mujhe muh ka chala ho gaya hai ak hafte se kafi pareshan hu na kuch khate pite ban raha hai sir koi upay bataiye taki ye jaldi se thik ho jaye.

Advanced Aesthetics, BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
Hi there are various reasons for mouth ulcers it could be because of spicy food, medications, bad digestion, eating hard food etc. You have go for a professional check up to get the exact cause and solution for the same.
1 person found this helpful
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I have problem of gum bleeding while brushing my teeth and also of bad breath. Please suggest some medicines.

MDS Periodontology, Dr. Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences & Hospital
Dentist, Panchkula
I have problem of gum bleeding while brushing my teeth and also of bad breath. Please suggest some medicines.
Bleeding gums can have various reasons like poor oral hygiene, gums infection etc. So visit a dentist nearby for a check up and hence the treatment.
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Sodas And Your Teeth

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Sodas And Your Teeth

It’s no secret there exists a strong link between soda consumption and tooth decay. Heavy soda consumption has also been linked to other health complications including diabetes, obesity and osteoporosis.

During the past generation, milk intakes have decreased while soda pop and 100 percent juice intakes have increased.  It has become a daily habit for a growing number of people, especially kids, teens and young adults. A steady consumption of soft drinks is one of the leading causes of tooth decay.

However, measures can be taken to prevent and reduce tooth decay. The conclusions of a recent study support contemporary daily dietary guidelines for children that include:

  • Consuming two or more servings of dairy foods
  • Limiting the intake of 100 percent juice to four to six ounces
  • Restricting other sugared beverages to occasional use

This doesn’t mean a person should never drink soda. In fact, drinking it in moderation may represent no harm at all.  However, substituting sugary, acidic carbonated beverages for water or intake of caloric food could be problematic in the long run.

How soda attacks your teeth

The “Sip All Day, Get Decay” slogan isn’t just meant to be a catchy tagline – it’s literally the truth!

Sugar in soda combines with bacteria in your mouth to form acid, which attacks the teeth. Diet or “sugar-free” soda contains its own acid, which also can damage teeth. Each attack lasts about 20 minutes and starts over with every sip of soda you take.

These ongoing acid attacks weaken tooth enamel. Kids and teens are most susceptible to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not fully developed.

You can avoid tooth decay and other health problems that arise from drinking too many soft drinks, other carbonated beverages, sports drinks, iced and sweet teas and other sweetened liquids (like fruit juices). Limiting your intake, brushing and flossing twice a day and visiting your dentist regularly will reduce your risk of tooth decay improve and/or maintain your oral health.

Stay hydrated the right way

Staying properly hydrated is critical to overall health – and some beverages are better suited for this than others. Most soft drinks contain sugar and caffeine which can actually SPEED UP dehydration.

While drinking sports drinks may keep your body hydrated, the ones with sugar also can unfortunately cause cavities. In addition, non-cola sodas, lemonade and sports drinks can cause significant damage to your teeth enamel, which can lead to tooth decay.

Did you know lack of water is the number one trigger for daytime fatigue? So next time you feel tired at work or school, don’t reach for a caffeinated beverage, drink water. It’s good for your body and won’t damage your teeth like soda and other caffeinated beverages.

DO:

  • Drink soda in moderation (no more than one 12 oz can a day)
  • Use a straw to keep the sugar away from your teeth
  • Swish your mouth out with water after drinking to dilute the acid and sugar if brushing your teeth is not possible.
  • Drink plenty of water (8 glasses a day)

DON’T:

  • Sip for extended periods of time
  • Drink soda shortly before bedtime
  • Brush after meals – wait at least an hour after your last drink or meal before brushing
  • Substitute soft drinks, sports drinks or fruit juice for a meal.

Other tips for maintaining a healthy smile:

  • Chew sugarless gum
  • Visit your dentist regularly
  • Brush and floss daily
  • Drink fluoridated water and use a fluoride toothpaste
  • Read the labels for sugar content

 

2 people found this helpful

I am brush my teeth regularly but my teeth is not look white and underside my teeth is going to be very dull. Please help

BDS
Dentist,
I am brush my teeth regularly but my teeth is not look white and underside my teeth is going to be very dull. Please ...
No toothpaste can make your teeth white. Of you want them brighter, get professional bleaching done.
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I have blood sugar with the range of 200 on p. P. Now I have to remove broken teeth which is paining. Now what efforts will take to remove it.

BDS
Dentist, Raipur
I have blood sugar with the range of 200 on p. P. Now I have to remove broken teeth which is paining. Now what effort...
Kindly get your sugar levels in normal range before extraction. Till then please take an antibiotic course for 3 days and a pain killer like tab ketorol dt 2 tablets dissolved in water. Brush your teeth twice daily using correct brushing technique to maintain your oral hygiene.
1 person found this helpful
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I am 22 years old and I have problems on when I eat some very sweet things then in my teeth paining. Please give me feedback.

MDS Prosthodontics
Dentist, Chandigarh
I am 22 years old and I have problems on when I eat some very sweet things then in my teeth paining. Please give me f...
Hello lybrate-user. Go for scaling and curretage of teeth and also there are chances that you have a decayed tooth which needs filling. Till then brush twice daily and use vantej paste.
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Hi, I have Jaw pain and regular acidity, and some time pain in left side of chest. Is something wrong. What should I do?

MDS
Dentist, Delhi
Hi, I have Jaw pain and regular acidity, and some time pain in left side of chest. Is something wrong. What should I do?
It’s acidity which may be causing jaw pain. Do salt water rinses every 2-3 hrs and consult a gastroenterologist in person.
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Oral And Dental Health

BDS (Gold Medalist)
Dentist, Gurgaon
Oral And Dental Health

One of the most common complications of having a tooth taken out is developing a dry socket. A dry socket is when the blood clot that is supposed to be in the extraction site either doesn’t form or is displaced. This exposes the bone in the area causing a severe toothache type pain. Many of my patients have told me that the dry socket pain is worse than the toothache that caused the tooth to need to be extracted! This pain can last anywhere from a week up to 5 weeks. Most dry sockets resolve in the shorter end of that range and will always resolve on their own whether you seek treatment or not. Some types of treatment will actually extend the healing time so keep that in mind.

So how do you know if you have a dry socket? Most dry sockets follow a relatively predictable pattern.

  • Tooth pain from an extraction generally peaks and starts to quickly decrease within 24-48 hours after the extraction. A dry socket on the other hand usually starts 3-5 days after having a tooth taken out.
  • Dry sockets have a much higher incidence after removal of impacted wisdom teeth (especially bottom wisdom teeth) as well as after difficult extractions.
  • Risk factors include smoking, using straws, spitting, taking birth control medication, and the intake of hot liquids and foods in the first day or two after the extraction.
  • Oftentimes you’ll see a hollow area where the tooth came out and sometimes you can see or feel the exposed bone.
  • If you notice pus coming out of the area, it may be infected rather than a dry socket. This is much less likely than a dry socket but can cause similar pain and in a similar time frame. See your dentist for sure if you are concerned it may be infected.

It is important to realize that while a dry socket can be miserably painful, there are no health consequences associated with it. All treatment seeks to manage the symptoms until the area is able to heal on it’s own. Studies have been pretty inconclusive as to what treatment, if any, is best for managing dry sockets. Let’s take a look at some of the things you can do at home.

  • Practice prevention. Avoid smoking for as long as you can manage after the extraction. 3 days minimum and longer is better. Don’t use straws or spit. Avoid hot foods for the first day or two after the extraction.
  • Take 600-800 mg of Ibuprofen every 6 hours on the dot. If you only take it when it hurts you’ll get into a bad pain cycle that is hard to get out of. Staying ahead of the pain is important.
  • Rinse any debris out of the socket. Food tends to get trapped down in there and can cause problems. The easiest way to do this is with a curved monoject syringe. Your dentist usually has these or you can sometimes get them at a pharmacy. An alternative would be a standard oral medication syringe (like you’d use to give medications to kids). As long as you reach the tip into the socket, it’ll work fine. Put some water in it and gently rinse the socket out. Don’t be forceful as this can also displace blood clots.
  • DIY Dry Socket Medications – Most medication materials that dentist’s use for dry sockets have some combination of eugenol (oil of cloves) and an anesthetic such as benzocaine as well as some other minor ingredients. Oil of cloves and benzocaine are both medications you can purchase over the counter. The best thing to do is make a 50/50 mixture of these two things and dip a piece of cotton in it.  Take a pair of tweezers or something similar that can hold the cotton and push the cotton into the socket. Make sure your cotton piece is big enough that when you push it into the socket you have enough sticking out the top to remove it. Leave it in for a couple of minutes and then remove. You don’t want to leave this in the socket long term as it will slow/stop healing. This combination of medications will help relieve some of the pain and you can do this several times a day.
  • If all else fails, remember that the DENTIST is just a stone throw distance away!
1 person found this helpful
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