Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Dr. D U Pathak - General Surgeon, Jabalpur

Dr. D U Pathak

86 (39 ratings)
MS, FACRSI

General Surgeon, Jabalpur

35 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹200 online
Dr. D U Pathak 86% (39 ratings) MS, FACRSI General Surgeon, Jabalpur
35 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹200 online
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services
Reviews

Personal Statement

Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. D U Pathak
Dr. D U Pathak is a trusted General Surgeon in Janki Nagar, Jabalpur. He has had many happy patients in his 34 years of journey as a General Surgeon. He has done MS, FACRSI. He is currently associated with Shalby Hospital Jabalpur in Janki Nagar, Jabalpur. Don?t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. D U Pathak on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified General Surgeons in India. You will find General Surgeons with more than 33 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best General Surgeons online in JABALPUR. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MS - Govt Medical College Jabalpur - 1982
FACRSI - Association of Colon & Rectal Surgeons of India - 2010
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
FIAGES
FMASI
FICS

Location

Book Clinic Appointment

Shalby Hospital Jabalpur

Plot B, Scheme No-5, Ahinsa Chowk, Kanchnar City Road, Vijay Nagar ColonyJabalpur Get Directions
  4.3  (39 ratings)
500 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments. Get first response within 6 hours.
7 days validity ₹200 online
Consult Now

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. D U Pathak

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Patient Review Highlights

"Practical" 1 review "Very helpful" 1 review "Helped me impr..." 1 review

Reviews

Popular
All Reviews
View More
View All Reviews

Feed

Hernia: Types and Treatment

MS, FACRSI
General Surgeon, Jabalpur
Hernia: Types and Treatment

When an organ residing in a cavity such as the abdomen tries to push through the muscular layer it resides in, it is called as hernia. 

Though said to be genetic, hernias can be caused by things such as improper heavy lifting, incorrect posture, or chronic constipation and as a result of surgical complication or injury. Factors like obesity, pregnancy, smoking, chronic lung disease aggravate the severity of the hernia. It is believed that about 27% of all males and 3% of females can have a hernia during their lifetime.

Types of hernias:

  1. Inguinal hernia: The groin is the most common area, where the abdomen pushes through a weak spot in the lower abdominal wall, causing a protrusion into the inguinal canal. This is more common in men than women.
  2. Hiatal hernia: The abdomen has the diaphragm separating it from the thoracic cavity in the upper border. When it pushes through the diaphragm, a hernia is caused and there is almost always associated food reflux in these cases. Though the most common cause is associated old age, due to muscle weakness, there also are cases of congenital hiatal hernias.
  3. Umbilical hernia: The abdomen finds a weak layer along its length and protrudes through the skin on the stomach. Most commonly seen in babies around the bellybutton, it gradually corrects itself on its own. Quiet rare in adults, seen during pregnancy and in chronic obese people.
  4. Incisional: These are post-surgical, and happen when the organ protrudes through the weakened wall due to surgery. The abdomen is again the most common area and the hernia can happen either onto the external surface or internally, when they are called ventral hernias.

These are the most frequent types, though hernia affects other organs like the spine, brain, appendix, etc.

Treatment:

This includes a combination of constant monitoring followed by a decision to do surgical treatment. Hiatal hernias and umbilical hernias can be monitored for a while before deciding on surgery. Inguinal hernias may require surgery earlier in the stage. Post-surgery, a mesh is placed to hold back the tissue in its corrected place. The umbilical hernia in children could be self-limiting. If it does not get auto-corrected in the first year of life, that also would qualify for a surgical treatment. Hernias need to be managed under medical supervision. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a General Surgeon.

2170 people found this helpful

Meri mataji ko multiple stone gallbladder mai Hai age 50 Hai mai operation 2/3 months ke baad karwa sakte Hai kyaa koi problem to nhi hogi report mai mm show nhi kiya Gaya Hai please help me.

MS, FACRSI
General Surgeon, Jabalpur
Meri mataji ko multiple stone gallbladder mai Hai age 50 Hai mai operation 2/3 months ke baad karwa sakte Hai kyaa ko...
Please get operated soon because it can slip into bile duct, block the bile and also cause pancreatitis. Get operated at earliest.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

4 Simple Ways To Care For Your Surgical Incision!

MS, FACRSI
General Surgeon, Jabalpur
4 Simple Ways To Care For Your Surgical Incision!

Having a surgery, big or small, will subject your body to a certain degree of pain. Post-operative care, hence, is of paramount importance. You'll have a surgical wound where the surgeon has made an incision. To ensure that it heals quickly and to reduce the risk of an infection, it is important that you care for your wound area and keep a regular check for unusual signs and symptoms.

Let us take a step back to understand the normal process of how a wound heals. At first, there will be inflammation during the first week when blood flow to your wound increases. This is a crucial care period as your wound is still fresh. The second phase is proliferation where new blood vessels and tissue begin to grow around the area.

The third and final phase is maturation where new cells develop to strengthen the wound and soften the scar. Depending on the location and size of your wound, your surgeon may have used stitches (medically called sutures), metal clips or staples, adhesive dressing, tape or glue. Stitches, clips and staples are usually removed between three and fourteen days after your treatment. Here is how you can care for your surgical incision:

  1. Change your dressing regularly: Most patients are called to the hospital at regular intervals during the first week for change of dressing two or three times. The nurse or doctor ensures a sterile environment during the process. If you find your dressing falling of late night and you can't go to the hospital, you can wash your hands thoroughly and open a new sterile dressing package and apply to your wound. At all times, touch only the edges of your old / new dressing.
  2. General care for your incision site: Keep the incision site as clean and dry as possible. Keep it covered with plastic during a shower if it is on your hands or legs or take a sponge bath until you get a green signal from your doctor. Protect the incision from sunlight. Some incisions may get itchy as they heal. This is quite common, but it is important not to scratch your incision during this period.
  3. Eating and drinking properly to heal quickly: Vitamin C and Proteins are important as they aid in healing of wounds. Eat a healthy and balanced diet, which includes a variety of lean meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, fruit and vegetables. Make sure that you drink enough water because if you're dehydrated, your wound may take longer to heal.
  4. Look for signs of infection: The common signs of an infection are redness, swelling, unusual drainage, warmth around the incision site increased pain or tenderness at the incision, incision opens up or a fever of more than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a General Surgeon.
2059 people found this helpful

Fistula-in-Ano or Anal Fistula - How It Can Be Treated?

MS, FACRSI
General Surgeon, Jabalpur
Fistula-in-Ano or Anal Fistula - How It Can Be Treated?

An anal fistula, is also called as fistula- in -ano, it is a small channel that develops between the end of the large intestine called the anal canal and the skin near the anus. This is a painful condition, especially when the patient is passing stools. It can also cause bleeding and discharge during defecation.

Genesis of fistula-in-ano
Almost all anal fistulae occur due to an anorectal abscess that begins as an infection in one of the anal glands. This infection spreads down to the skin around the anus causing fistula-in -ano. The anorectal abscess usually leads to pain and swelling around the anus, along with fever. Treatment for anorectal abscess involves incising the skin over the abscess to drain the pus. This is done usually under local anesthesia. A fistula-in-ano happens when there is failure of the anorectal abscess wound to heal completely. Almost 50% of patients with an abscess go on to develop a chronic fistula-in-ano.

Symptoms

  1. Pain- Constant pain which gets worse when sitting down
  2. Irritation around the anus, like swelling, redness and tenderness
  3. Discharge of blood or pus
  4. Constipation or pain while evacuation
  5. Fever

Diagnosis
A clinical evaluation, including a digital rectal examination under anesthesia, is carried out to diagnose anal fistula. However, few patients may be advised screening for rectal cancer, sexually transmitted diseases and diverticular disease.

Treatment
The only cure for an anal fistula is surgery. The type of surgery will depend on the position of the anal fistula. Most patients are treated by simply laying open the fistula tract to flush out pus, called Fistulotomy. This type is used in 85-95% of cases and the fistula tract heals after one to two months.

  1. Seton techniques: A seton is a piece of thread (silk, plastic) which is left in the fistula tract to treat anal fissures. This is used if a patient is at high risk of developing incontinence after fistulotomy.
  2. Advancement flap procedures: When the fistula is considered complex, carrying a high risk of incontinence, then this advanced technique is used.

Other techniques like Fibrin glue and Bioprosthetic plug are also used to surgically treat anal fistulas. In the Fibrin glue technique, glue is injected into the fistula to seal the tract, after which the opening is stitch closed. Bioprosthetic plug is a cone shaped plug made from human tissue, which is used to block the internal opening of the fistula. After this stitches are used to keep the plug in place. 

Whatever the surgical technique, one can experience minor changes in continence. Patients usually don’t require antibiotics after surgery but have to take pain medication. They may also have to use gauze to soak up drainage from anus. After surgery, patients should seek help if they have increased pain or swelling, heavy bleeding, difficulty in urination, high temperature, nausea or constipation. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a General surgeon.

1836 people found this helpful

Colorectal Surgery - Disorders It Can Treat!

MS, FACRSI
General Surgeon, Jabalpur
Colorectal Surgery - Disorders It Can Treat!

Colorectal surgery deals with the disorders of the rectum, anus and colon. Another name of colon is ‘large intestine’. These three body parts form the last stages of the digestive process. When the human waste passes through the colon, its salt and water are extracted before it exits the body as human excreta.

Colorectal disorders

  1. Swelling and inflammation of the veins in the anus (also called as Haemorrhoids)
  2. Anal fissures- unnatural cracks and fissures in the anal area
  3. Fistulas or the unnatural connections between the anus and other anorectal areas
  4. Conditions of constipation
  5. Incontinence in passing of faeces
  6. When the walls of the rectum protrude through the anus- also called as Rectal prolapse
  7. Birth defects such as imperforate anus
  8. Anal cancer- this condition is rare
  9. Colorectal cancer- cancer of colon and rectum
  10. Any injuries to the anus
  11. Removal of any objects inserted into the anus

Bowel habits after colorectal surgery
Many patients report cases of diarrhoea, leakage of stool or gas, urgency to use the toilet and a feeling of insufficient evacuation of faeces. Relax; these conditions are not going to last forever. Your rectum and anus are adjusting to new conditions after this surgery. These organs may take six to twelve months to adjust to new bowel habits.

Is there a need to take a laxative or stool softener?
There is no need to take laxatives after a colorectal surgery. Drink lots of water to make your stool softer and easy to pass. If there is a water deficiency in your body, then it may lead to your faeces becoming hard. In that case, take milk of magnesium, colace etc.

Activities post surgery
You can continue with your normal schedule after this surgical procedure. Carry on running, jogging, exercising, climbing up the stairs etc. even after your surgery. Gastroenterologists recommend that patients should desist from lifting loads weighing more than 10 pounds so that there are no post surgery complications.

Diet after colorectal surgery
Avoid spicy and heavy to digest meals after your surgery. Once the intestines begin working normally, you can continue having your spicy food. Chew your food well to aid its digestion.

Returning to work after colorectal surgery
Most people are back to their work after taking a break of 2-5 days. If the surgery is pretty detailed, you may have to take a break of up to a month. Patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery may have to take a rest of 2- 4 weeks before they report back to work. Take it easy before slipping into your regular schedule. If working hurts after your surgery, don’t do it. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a general surgeon.

1741 people found this helpful
View All Feed