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Dr. Venkata Narayan P

Veterinarian, Hyderabad

at clinic
Dr. Venkata Narayan P Veterinarian, Hyderabad
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Venkata Narayan P
Dr. Venkata Narayan P is an experienced Veterinarian in Vanasthalipuram, Hyderabad. He is currently practising at Pvn Animal Clinic in Vanasthalipuram, Hyderabad. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Venkata Narayan P on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 32 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Hyderabad and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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My dog snoop is very sick I think. His eyes are red. Always red. He is fine in the morning but after 4.20 he acts crazy. I don't know what to do.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian
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It might be seems some allergies which normally cause eyes red. You can use any antiallergic drug like cetirizine. You should share some pic. Of your pet before you should start using any drug?

My pet cat is one month old and she is suffering from cough and cold .what can I do for her?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian
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Better to allow her to breathe steam vapours from a little distance, add eukalyptus oil to cotton and put near her in the room. Also you can apply vicks vapourub near her nose. Wipe any secretions near nose with warm salt water.

BVSc
Veterinarian
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Five Common Summer Hazards for Dogs

1. Dehydration
One of the best ways to keep your dog safe in the summer time is by providing lots of cool, clean, fresh water. Consider preparing low sodium chicken broth or yogurt ice cubes, and introducing canned dog foods (best when frozen in a Kong!) to increase the moisture content in your dog’s diet.

2. Burned Pads
Under the summer sun, asphalt on sidewalks and streets can heat to a temperature that can burn a dog’s paws. To avoid scorched paws, walk your dog very early in the morning or in the late evening when the streets have cooled off. If you must walk your dog during the day, dog booties can protect his feet. Always put your hand down on the asphalt for about thirty seconds – if you must pull your hand away because the street is too hot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on without hurting his paws. If you don’t want your hand on the street for thirty seconds, your dog probably does not want his paws on it for thirty or more minutes of walking.

3. Parasites
Summer is the season for fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes; pests which can present a minor discomfort to your dog at best and at worst may be life threatening or cause self-mutilating behaviors. Feeding your dog a high quality diet, without preservatives or chemicals will build his immune system, making him generally more resistant to parasite infestation. There are a wide variety of preventatives on the market, including chemical spot-on treatments, repellent shampoos, essential oils, and flea/tick collars; talk to your vet to see what she recommends for your dog. Cleaning your house frequently and keeping your dog well groomed will also reduce the risk of parasite infestation.

4. Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a serious risk to dog’s health – in worst case scenarios, it can be fatal. You can prevent heat stroke by restricting your pet’s exercise during the hottest hours of the day (early morning or late evening are the best times for exercise during the summer), by making sure he is well hydrated, providing cool places for him to relax, providing opportunities to swim, cooling mats, and by never leaving your dog unattended in the car during summer heat.

Many dogs die annually in hot cars. Even if your windows are cracked or you park in the shade, heat can build quickly in a car in the summer, turning it into an oven. If it’s 95 degrees at noon and you leave your windows cracked, the temperature in your car may still rise as high as 113 degrees. This is a recipe for disaster for your dog. If you must leave your dog in the car for any period of time, the air conditioning should stay on. Leaving a dog to die in a hot car is not just a health risk for your dog, but may be cause for animal cruelty charges in some area. The solution? Don’t leave your dog in a hot car.

5. Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is contracted through bodily fluids or tissue and can be transmitted through direct (as in the case of a bite or ingestion of flesh) or indirect contact (through water sources, food, etc.) with an infected animal. Stagnant waters are a common source of leptospirosis bacteria. Lepto can cause permanent health problems or death if not treated quickly. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, trembling/shaking, lethargy, anorexia, tenderness of joints and muscles, and increased water intake. If you suspect your dog has lepto, get him to a vet right away, an emergency vet if need be.

There are vaccines for lepto but they do not prevent all strains and can cause significant adverse reactions. Talk to your vet about weighing the risk of infection with the risks associated with the lepto vaccine.

I have a pet dog his name is tayson and how should I train him like a professional and want to know about health tips for him.?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian
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Training should be started at the age of 3+ months as the age increases the pets power to be get trained decreases so if possible you should go for training along with a professional dog trainer for first two to three months latter on you can carry on

Hello sir, I have a 55 days old puppy(GSD and rot mix). Its stomach is always hot and there are some boils also. She is done with the first vaccination and deworming.She weighs 1.6 kg. My Vet says it is under weight. I am giving ostropet and pet glow twice a day. My area of concern is : 1. Boils 2. It is so hot when I touch the stomach. 3. Puppy always sleeps and it bites us a lot. How do we avoid? 4. When shall I start training my puppy? Regards Ramya

MVSc
Veterinarian
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Boil on stomach due to some allergy or bacterial infection so apply antibiotics cream on boil. Pupy body temp in more than human so don't worry.For chewing it happen due to milk teeth so him calcium bone for chewing. Training start fr today.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian
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"SCOOP THE POOP"
Every time you take your pet out for his daily business... carry a plastic bag and clean up the poop, to contribute your share to keep our environment clean!
Since dogs are meat eaters, their poop contents nitrogenous wastes and can contaminate nearby water bodies.
Dog poop can carry potentially harmful bacterias and worms, which can spread within the area around and pose risk to other humans and pets..!
Besides, no one likes to step on pet waste and spread it to homes, cars and workplaces.
Be a responsible owner.. Scoop the poop!!!!

I have a black rabbit and he's 2 years old, my question is how can I help him wid his loose motions.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian
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Please provide lacto bacillus powder (sporolac sachets) in his diet. You can add it in water or can feed directly also. Don't give any oral antibiotics as these may aggravate the condition. Thank you.

My rabbit suffer in fever from yesterday.What is the treatment of rabbit fever? plz reply

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian
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Use paracetamol 125 mg oral baby suspension 2-3 ml thrice daily with vitamin tonic as a supportive therapy

My dog, a mix of labra and pomerian, getting a lot of hair fall from last 2-3 days. She has recently recovered from fever and stomach infection. She was given bath 2 days back and since then a lot of hair fall althouh hair fall was before this bath also but not much.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian
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I think it has combined affect of winter shedding and also the skin infection, so please go for omega 3, 6 fatty acids supplement and if not recovered on 15 days pls consult an vet near by.

I have bought a 35 days old labrador puppy, can you please tell me what to feed him, I fed him cerelac but now he is having loose motion, also tell how to cure it.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian
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Loosies. Need to be treated urgently rush him to a vet. Food. Lactol milk powder starter. Dry puppy food. Brand. Natural and delicious.

Question specifically for a veterinarian but open to all. Post exposure rabies vaccination in injured pet cat, bitten by unknown animal (probably by stray dog), with visible bite mark injuries on back, resulting in paralysis of the the rear section of the cat (hind legs dragging) due to fracture of the spinal chord. My cat (female, 4 years) old was bitten on April 14th 2016 by an unknown animal (the vet in my place India suspected it to be a dog). She was pregnant at the time of injury. The cat was vaccinated (rabies vaccine CANVAC® R) given in last January and February 2015, I took the cat in a jute sack to the veterinarian and his assistant ,however, injected the vaccines both the times through the sack, however he said to me that he was sure that the vaccines were injected successfully. The cat however missed the scheduled anti rabies booster dose in Feb 2016. Actually the cat it belonged to my aunt residing near my house but somehow she came to our place, however at night she always stay outside like a free roaming cat. Two months back (possibly nite of April 14th 2016) the injury took place and we found her in our garage dragging her hind limbs, the doctor (veterinarian ) confirmed it to be bite injury causing damage in her spinal column, she initially could not urinate on her own, her bladder has to be evacuated with catheter every alternate day for a month. She underwent cesarean on May 5th and two kitten survived, kitten are healthy. After the injury she was given post exposure prophylaxis 5 doses of Nobivac® Rabies on 0,3,7,14 and 28th starting from April 15th to May 13th (however the 7th and 14th dose delayed by 1 and 5 days due to urine infection and fever. Is this post exposure vaccination effective? The vet in my place performed an xray on May 16th and plain xray revealed irreparable spinal chord fracture (probably the teeth of the biting stray dog went inside the spinal chord). Other than unable to urinate on her own sometimes and the rear leg paralysis, the cat looks fine, will the post exposure rabies vaccine work, is there any chance of her developing rabies in the future? In my place, there is no vet center where we can quarantine her for 6 months , so we have kept her home? It will be almost 3 months after the injury and she has not show any signs of rabies, she is eating fine and behaving normally , other than unable to walk due to hind leg paralysis cause of the spinal chord injury. Somewhere I read in the internet that "--post exposure prophylaxis should not be given on injured cats cause it mask symptoms of infection (like rabies) in cats. The documented rabies quarantine time is 6 months. There is a chance that any pet bitten by an unknown animal can develop rabies as we cannot affirm that the attacker did not have rabies--" But the veterinarian in my place gave the post exposure rabies injection, is this correct? Is there any chance of developing rabies in my cat in the future? Me and my family are taking care of the cat in the best possible way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian
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Rabies can cause only and only by an infected mammal only to any mammal walking the earth. Infected mammals like a dog, may show typical signs of rabies (mad dog with ropy saliva from the jaws and red eyes), so easily identified a d isolated by fellow pack mates and humans. Rabies vaccination protects (doesn't mask the signs) a mammal like a cat or a dog or a human, from being infected by rabies when bitten by a rabid animal. Symptoms of rabies can be seen within a week to 10 days from the day of bite. Extra dosages of a rabies vaccine would not coz any harm as such except mild fever or local pain at the site of injection for a day or two. Your family is safe in handling the cat as it is not showing any such sign of the rabies infection so far. Rabies is transmitted only when your blood will come in contact with the saliva of an infected animal.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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What are the rules every dog owner should follow?

The number one way to communicate to a dog that you are his pack leader is to take him/her for a Pack walk daily, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the human who is holding the lead. This is most important for all dogs, as in a dog?s mind, the leader always leads the way.
A dog must not be allowed to sniff or eliminate anywhere he wishes, but only where you allow him.
The dog should be concentrating on following the human.
All humans must eat before the dogs.
No table scraps should be fed to the dog during a meal.
Feedings must be at a scheduled time.
Humans must not let the dog go through any doorway first.
When you have left the house or the room, even for a minute and come back, ignore the dog for a few minutes.
A simple obedience command should be given before any pleasurable interaction with the dog. A child in the house should give the commands at least once a day and reward the dog with a treat when the command is followed.
You should not lie on the floor to watch TV when the dog is around, as a human should never put himself in an equal or lesser height position than the dog.
You are the first one who greets newcomers; the dog is the last that gets attention.
If a dog is lying in your path, do not walk around the dog, either make the dog move or step over the dog.
If you establish eye contact with the dog, the dog must avert his gaze first. Tell the children not to have staring contest with the dog.
Dogs must not sleep in your bed.
Games of fetch or play with toys must be started and ended by the human.
Dog should not be allowed to lie on your furniture.
No tug?of?war, as this is a game of power and you may lose the game giving the dog reinforcement (in the dog?s mind) of top dog.
Dogs need to be taught ?drop it? or ?release? command.
Dogs should not be allowed to pull on the leash.
When you put the food dish down, the dog must wait until you give the "OK" to eat it.
Small dogs or puppies who demand to be picked up or put down should not get what they want until they sit or do another acceptable quiet behavior.
Dogs should never be left unsupervised with children or anyone who cannot maintain leadership over the dog.
Last but certainly not least... avoid emotions, when you are around your dog. Your dog can sense these emotions and will see you as weak.

What should be the temperature range in which kitten live? When at what age will they do not need mother's milk? What will mother do if we give her kitten to new owner?

Veterinarian
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Most conformable temp is 25 degree centigrade. Ideally mother milk is needed upto4 to 6 week of age. Agter age of 20 to 22 days semisolids food can be introduced.

I have a 7yr labrador. Of late he has started snoring. Is it alright?

MVSC
Veterinarian
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What is the weight of the dog. Overweight also contribute to snore. Check any growth in the nose or nasal passage if possible. Is he normal otherwise in its day to day activities. If nothing abnormal observed in its feeding and activity there is no need to worry.

I adopted a 3 months old male Labrador puppy. It is having loose motions now n one episode of vomiting. It is completely vaccinated for first year. I changed its diet from pedigree to home cooked vegetarian food without any spices. What could be the reason?

Veterinarian
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Sudden food change can be one ofbthe reson of stomach upset. Apart from this othet reason are stomach or inyestine infection, worms or eating unsual things. Kindly get your puppy examined from vet and follow his advice.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian
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Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian
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Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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What are the signs of rabies in dogs/cats?
Any change in normal behavior suggesting either undue aggression or depression.
Running aimlessly and attacking others without provocation.
Becomes too drowsy and withdraws to a corner.
Change in voice/bark.
Excessive salivation.
Refusal to feed or eating objects like stone, paper, wood, metal pieces etc.
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