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Dr. Uyyala Dasaradha

Nephrologist, Hyderabad

50 at clinic
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Dr. Uyyala Dasaradha Nephrologist, Hyderabad
50 at clinic
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To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Uyyala Dasaradha
Dr. Uyyala Dasaradha is one of the best Nephrologists in Punjagutta, Hyderabad. You can visit her at Nizam's Institute Of Medical Sciences in Punjagutta, Hyderabad. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Uyyala Dasaradha on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Nephrologists in India. You will find Nephrologists with more than 34 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Nephrologists online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Nizam's Institute Of Medical Sciences

Panjagutta. Landmark: Near GVK Mall, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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I am 40yr male and I have a stone last 3 month. what should I do? Please help me.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Faridabad
I am 40yr male and I have a stone last 3 month. what should I do? Please help me.
Tips for removing kidney stones:: 1. Avoid tea, coffee, alcohol, cold drinks, pickles, fish, poultry, meat, spinach, and chocolate..... 2. Avoid sour, heavy, and dry food. 3. Increase intake of liquids like water, juice, soup, lime water lemon soda etc. 4. Be sure to drink enough water each day. Usually 1 to 2 liters of water per day is adequate. 5. Drink more if you are perspiring heavily, working outdoors, the weather is hot, etc. 6. Increase the use of barley, horse gram (a type of bean), ginger, and brown rice or parboiled rice. 7. Avoid suppressing urges to urinate and defecate. 9. Boil 10-12 basil leaves in 1 cup of water for 15 minutes. Mix 1 teaspoon of honey in it and take twice a day. Pls send ur USG report becoz medication for stones depends upon size number and location of stones and can be given after USG.
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How To Treat Kidney Stones?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, M.Ch - Urology
Urologist, Mohali
How To Treat Kidney Stones?

Treatment for Kidney stones varies depending on the size and type of the stone or the symptoms caused by it. In case of small stones, medication and simple changes in lifestyle can be enough to treat it, but surgeries and extensive treatments are required if symptoms are severe. Following are treatment options for kidney stones: 

  1. Small stones with minimal symptoms: Drinking water: Drinking around 3 litres of water a day will regulate your urinary system and can effectively eliminate small stones. Unless your doctor advices otherwise, drinking ample amount of fluids, usually water, is one of the commonest way to get rid of small kidney stones. 
  2. Pain relievers: There might be a considerable amount of pain and discomfort associated with passing the stone through urine. Your doctor may recommend pain killers like Ibuprofen, Naproxen sodium or acetaminophen. 
  3. Medical therapy: In order to eliminate the kidney stone, your doctor may administer medical therapy. Medication like alpha blocker helps in passing the kidney stone with least pain and more quickly. It relaxes the muscles in the ureter and makes the process relatively easy. 

Large stones with severe symptoms: 

  1. Extracorporeal Lithotripsy (ESWL): ESWL uses the help of sound waves to create vibrations which breaks the stones in smaller pieces. This procedure takes about an hour and can cause mild pain and discomfort. Your doctor may administer sedatives to reduce your sensitivity. More than one sessions of ESWL may be required depending upon the response. ESWL has side effects like blood in urine or bruising in the abdomen. 
  2. Surgical removal of kidney stones: Surgical removal of kidney stones is done with the help of a procedure called percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). It uses small telescopes and other instruments which are inserted in your back through a small incision. It is generally done in case of large stones and when ESWL fails. 
  3. Ureterorenoscopy (URS): A thin illuminated tube called ureteroscope is used to remove a stones in the ureter (a tube leading from kidney to the urinary bladder). The ureteroscope is equipped with a tiny camera which determines the location of the stone which is then broken into pieces with the help of other instruments. It may require general or regional anesthesia
  4. Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery (RIRS): In this procedure a flexible endoscope is passed through the urethra into the ureter and the kidney. The stone is localised and is fragmented into small pieces with the help of laser. Fragments are then removed through the urethra. Usually a stent is placed after the surgery which is removed after a couple of weeks. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Urologist.
1939 people found this helpful

My mother in law is suffering from high blood pressure since many years. Her Age - 48 yrs. Weight - 65 kg. Her uterus was removed 10 years back. Her gall bladder was removed many years back. She had undergone many medical tests. Everything came out normal. She is taking so many medicines. But still sometimes her blood pressure shoots up. Since last couple of days its 180/100. She is feeling uneasiness, lethargic, weakness, neck pain all most all the time. She is self employed. Lives alone. Husband passed away long time back. Daughter married. She is taking Amtas 5 mg, Telday H 80 mg, Zabesta 2.5 mg, Aztolet (10+75), Minipress XL 10 mg, Rablet IT, Thyrox 75 mcg, CCM tab every day. Her Blood Urea & Creatinine Serum Creatinine 0.9 mg/dL, Urea Serum 20 mg/dL. FREE T4 - Serum 16.01 pmol/L. TSH Serum 4.38. Metanephirines 633.3 (24 hrs urine sample). Potassium- Serum 4.4. Sodium- Serum 131. Glucose-Plasma (Fasting) 91. Vitamin D Total- Serum 16. Her CT 128 Cardiac Angio was done. Findings- Normal. Aldosterone-Serum 13.90. CT Scan of whole abdomen (specially adrenal gland) was done. Fundings- No Adenoma, No Pheochromocytoma. Patchy calcification of hepatic parenchyma seen-likely, healed granuloma. Bilateral non obstructing renal calculi (at lower pole). No adrenal SOL identified. Stone found in left kidney.

MBBS
General Physician, Jalgaon
My mother in law is suffering from high blood pressure since many years. Her Age - 48 yrs. Weight - 65 kg. Her uterus...
Please Ask her to. Go for morning and evening walk daily with relaxed mind Do neck, back and shoulders exercises daily Do meditation regularly Take salads, vegetable juices and soups more Continue her current medicine.
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Diet In Chronic Kidney Disease

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Nephrology
Nephrologist, Delhi
Diet In Chronic Kidney Disease

What is Chronic Kidney Disease?

Chronic Kidney Disease (also known as Chronic Renal Failure) is the progressive loss of kidney function occurring over a span of several months to several years and is characterised by the replacement of kidney architecture with interstitial fibrosis.

Chronic kidney disease is classified into five stages on the basis or proteinuria (presence of protein in large amounts in the urine) or Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) - 1 being the mildest with no distinct symptoms and 5 being end stage renal failure.

Causes and Risk Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease-

The various reasons (called risk factors) that can increase chances of Chronic Kidney Diseases are:

  1. Diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia (excess fat proteins in the blood)
  2. Hypertension

  3. Family history heritable renal disease

  4. Older age, smoking

  5. Autoimmune disease

  6. Past episodes of acute renal disease

The direct causes of Chronic Kidney Diseases are-

  1. Diabetic nephropathy (leading cause)

  2. Hypertensive nephropathy

  3. Glomerulonephritis (swelling of the glomerulus in the kidneys)

  4. Reno-vascular disease (ischemic nephropathy)

  5. Polycystic kidney disease

  6. HIV-associated nephropathy

  7. Transplant allograft failure

  8. Exposure to drugs and toxins

Diet that you must maintain in Chronic Kidney Disease-

It is essential to make dietary as well as lifestyle amends once you are diagnosed with CKD. The main purpose of this diet is to maintain the levels of carbohydrates, fluids and minerals. This is done to prevent the buildup of waste products in the body as the kidneys are unable to fulfil its function properly.

It is recommended to refer a dietician who can make you a diet chart that helps you adhere to your diet.

Here is a list of food items that you may avoid or may consume if you are suffering from Chronic Kidney Disease:

  1. Carbohydrates : Carbohydrates are a good source of energy. If the intake of protein has been restricted, then it is recommended to replace that with carbohydrates as a source of energy. Fruits, vegetables, grains and bread can be consumed as they are rich source of fibres, minerals and various types of vitamins. You can indulge in some hard candies or sweets as well.

  2. Fats: Fats can provide a good amount of calories as well. Ensure that you only stick to healthy fats such as the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats that are good for your cardiac health.

  3. Reduce your phosphorus intake: A diet with no more than 800 mg of phosphorus can help reduce the risk of too much phosphorus building up in your blood.  Limit intake of foods with high levels of phosphate or phosphate additives such as organ meats, whole grain breads, processed foods, cola beverages, cheese, dried beans, liver, peanut butter, dairy products and chocolate. Many beverages and processed foods have these additives. Other high-phosphorus foods to limit include:

    • Cheese
    • Chocolate
    • Ice cream
    • Legumes
    • Milk
    • Nuts
    • Seeds
    • Yogurt
  4. Monitor your potassium levels: Usually, potassium is not restricted in stage 3 CKD unless lab tests show potassium is too high. Your doctor may make medication changes or prescribe a low-potassium diet. Reduce an elevated potassium level by limiting some high-potassium foods and potassium chloride (found in salt substitute and many low-sodium processed foods), such as avocado, bananas, cantaloupe, honeydew, legumes, milk, nuts, potatoes, seeds, tomato products and yogurt. Some high-potassium foods to limit or avoid include:
    • Avocado
    • Bananas
    • Cantaloupe and honeydew melon
    • Dried fruit
    • Legumes
    • Milk
    • Nuts and seeds
    • Oranges and orange juice
    • Potatoes
    • Pumpkin and winter squash
    • Tomato products (juices, sauces, paste)
    • Yogurt
  5. Proteins: Usually, before undergoing dialysis, it is recommended to adhere to a low-protein intake diet. However when you are undergoing dialysis, it is necessary to consume a certain amount of protein. This detailed information can be obtained from your dietician.
  6. Fluids: In the early stages of CKD, your fluid intake is not monitored. But as the disease progresses, you need to check your intake of fluids as too much fluids may accumulate in your body and create pressure on your kidneys.

  7. Sodium Or Salt Intake: Keeping a check on your salt intake reduces the risks of high blood pressure. Also, having food low on salt can reduce your thirst and prevent fluid retention in your body. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a nephrologist.
3242 people found this helpful

I am diagnosed stones in kidneys. Right kidney shows mildly dilated PCS. Right ureter is also mildly dilated & shows a calculus measuring app 8mm in the mid ureter. Two calculus measuring app 4 & 5 mm are seen in the upper & middle calyxes of the right kidney respectively. Left kidney also shows a calculus measuring app 4mm in upper calyx. Please help.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
I am diagnosed stones in kidneys. Right kidney shows mildly dilated PCS. Right ureter is also mildly dilated & shows ...
These small ones may go by themselves and drink a lot of water But a larger one may need surgery which is simple and a one day procedure like lithotripsy
3 people found this helpful
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Is it ok to have dark urine color? Is it due to dehydration? My urine color is dark yellow from past 3 days. Since im Taking vitamins tablet is it the reason behind it?

MBBS
General Physician, Cuttack
Is it ok to have dark urine color? Is it due to dehydration? My urine color is dark yellow from past 3 days. Since im...
1. It could be due to dehydration 2. Drink plenty of water (8-10 glasses daily) 3. If urine colour is still dark, get your urine examined for bile salt and bile pigment 4. Consult physician for further advice.
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Hello, just got my report today from Lybrate- aarogya 1.2 tests. All parameters is within normal except following: eGFR:85 (value). Normal range >=90. Is my kidney affected? Other parameters are as follows: BUN:17.93, Creatinine Serum: 1.05, Uric Acid: 5.5, Calcium:9.68, BUN/serum Creatinine Ratio: 17.08. Please suggest your views on my Kidney health.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Hello, just got my report today from Lybrate- aarogya 1.2 tests. All parameters is within normal except following: eG...
Following the classical way, we can assert that normal GFR values are largely over 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 in healthy subjects, at least before the age of 70 years. However, we know that GFR physiologically decreases with age, and in adults older than 70 years, values below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 could be considered normal. A normal e GFR is 60 or more. If your e GFR is less than 60 for three months or more, your kidneys may not be working well. If you e GFR is below 15, you may need to start dialysis or have a kidney transplant. Use this scale to see what your eGFR may mean. Your values are normal and your kidney is fine
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