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Dr. Syed Azam Hashmi

Neurologist, Hyderabad

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Dr. Syed Azam Hashmi Neurologist, Hyderabad
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Syed Azam Hashmi
Dr. Syed Azam Hashmi is one of the best Neurologists in Secunderabad, Hyderabad. He is currently practising at Wel Care in Secunderabad, Hyderabad. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Syed Azam Hashmi on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Neurologists online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Wel Care

Opp Mini Tankbund, Safilguda, Malkajigiri, Secunderabad, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Sometimes I feel whole vibration in my hands & legs ,is it symptoms of some disease or not? Please tell me.

NCCH & MCH
Homeopath, Kolkata
Sometimes I feel whole vibration in my hands & legs ,is it symptoms of some disease or not? Please tell me.
Kindly get Mri of spine and brain done along with CBC and nerve conduction test to rule out the diagnosis and direct the treatment thereupon otherwise if you want only treatment consult back then also.
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Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

MA - Clinical Psychology, P.G. Diploma in Guidance and Counseling, BA In Psychology
Psychologist, Mumbai
Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.


 

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.


 

Here are some signs to look out for:

  1. Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten

  2. Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet

  3. Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make

  4. Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat

  5. Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'

  6. Has difficulty learning new words

  7. Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age

  8. Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences

  9. Has trouble rhyming


 

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School

  1. Struggles with reading and spelling

  2. Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'

  3. Has trouble remembering facts and numbers

  4. Has difficulty gripping a pencil

  5. Has difficulty using proper grammar

  6. Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization

  7. Gets tripped up by word problems in math

  8. Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words

  9. Has trouble following a sequence of directions


 

Warning Signs in High School

  1. Struggles with reading out loud

  2. Doesn't read at the expected grade level

  3. Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms

  4. Has difficulty organizing and managing time

  5. Struggles to summarize a story

  6. Has difficulty learning a foreign language


 

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia:

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:


 

General:

  1. Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.

  2. Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."

  3. Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.

  4. High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.

  5. Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.

  6. Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.

  7. Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.

  8. Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."

  9. Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.


 

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  1. Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.

  2. Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.

  3. Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.

  4. Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.

  5. Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.

  6. Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.


 

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  1. Spells phonetically and inconsistently.

  2. Hearing and Speech Skills

  3. Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.

  4. Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.


 

Writing and Motor Skills:

  1. Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.

  2. Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.

  3. Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.

  4. Math and Time Management Skills

  5. Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.

  6. Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.

  7. Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.

  8. Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.


 

Memory and Cognition:

  1. Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.

  2. Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.

  3. Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).

  4. Behavior, Health, Development and Personality

  5. Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.

  6. Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.

  7. Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).

  8. Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.

  9. Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.

  10. Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.

  11. Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.


 

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  • Read out loud every day

  • Tap into your child's interests

  • Use audiobooks

  • Look for apps and other high-tech help

  • Focus on effort, not outcome

  • Make your home reader-friendly

  • Boost confidence


 

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  • Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.

  • Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.

  • Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can opt for appointments at clinic or online over here.

4 people found this helpful

L have a lil migraine problem from last two years. And I often face problems during study. Please suggest me what should I do to relieve form this problem.

BHMS
Homeopath, Lucknow
Go for eye test also. Avoid stress. Take proper rest & sleep. Avoid fatty food, junk food, chocolates etc. When you suffer from headache, go in a dark room & take rest. Take onosmodium q/ bd 15-15 drops+ 1/2 cup water daily. Belladonna 200/od daily for 21 days.
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I am feeling numbness on my right hand for 3-4 days. Please help me understanding what could be my problem. Thank you.

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
Kindly show me digital x rays of cervical spine. Rule out diabetes & vit. D deficiency or any other metabolic disorder. Sleep on a hard bed with soft bedding on it. Spring beds, folding beds or thick matress are harmful use no pillow under the head. Do hot fomantation. Ibuprofen 200mg od & sos x 5days bio d3 max 1tab od x10 do neck, back & general exercises. It may have to be further investigated. You will need other supportive medicines also. Make sure you are not allergic to any of the medicines you are going to take. Do reply back for detailed treatment plan. Do not ignore. It could be beginning of a serious problem.
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Sir janm ke saath mind slow tha baad me 3 year pahle chalne me problem hone laga abhi conditions ye hai ki pura chal nai raha hai 1 year pahle IGI PATNA me dikhaya MRI bhi karaya par chal nai pa raha hai dawa abhi jo chal raha hai, lobazyme 10 mg, valparin 500mg, neurokind please tell.

MBBS, MD - Community Medicine
General Physician, Jaipur
It looks like it is a case of cerebral palsy. I can comment exactly and more on prognosis of condition, when you send reports. In cases, there is no complete recovery, but much benefit can be achieved using some medications, and physiotherapy.
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Age: 29 years. Sex: Male Problem: Feeling loss of energy for sometime now. Feel drowsy after a small spell of work. Wrist and knee joints often feel numbed. What should I do?

BHMS
Homeopath, Murshidabad
Age: 29 years.
Sex: Male
Problem: Feeling loss of energy for sometime now. Feel drowsy after a small spell of work. W...
Dear lybrate user, take homoeopathic mother tincture acid phos q, 30 drops, thrice daily, after meals in a cup of water. Try to get a un-interrupted sleep of 8 hours daily. Drink a lots of water daily. If you have a habit of masturbation then you should not masturbate for more than twice in a week. Abstain from any type of addiction if you have any.
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I am 63 years old man. and suffering from parkinson I am very much disturb with cramping in the legs. Can it be cure?

MD-PhD, FIPS, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Ludhiana
Pain is the most common reason people in the United States visit their doctors each year. Although pain is highly subjective and difficult to describe, a working definition is ?an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential physical damage.? Its components are physical, cognitive, behavioral, emotional and perceptual. Among people who have Parkinson?s disease (PD), pain is a major complaint. In fact, up to 85 percent of people with Parkinson?s report pain as a troubling symptom. Some of these people experience pain as an early symptom of Parkinson?s, before their disease has even been diagnosed. Yet, pain in Parkinson?s disease often remains undiagnosed and untreated. Thus, it is important to understand that pain can be part of the Parkinson?s experience and to learn ways to manage it. Causes of Pain in Parkinson?s Pain researchers use a classification system that is based on the separation of tissue pain receptors from the nerves that transmit pain signals. Pain can be classified as nociceptive, which relates to tissue damage, implicating the pain receptors in the skin, bones or surrounding tissues; as neuropathic, indicating pain arising in nerves; or as a mixed pain syndrome involving both nociceptive and neuropathic pain. In Parkinson?s, most pain experiences seem to result from tissue that is injured or has the potential to be damaged: causes include persistent tremor, muscle rigidity, dystonia, musculoskeletal injury (i.e., sprains, bruises, bone fractures resulting from a fall etc.), burns and inflammation. The pain is typically well-localized to the affected body part; it may fluctuate with the medication dosing. Pain caused by dystonia can be diagnosed when there is visible twisting, cramping or posturing of the painful body part. The most common areas of the body where people with Parkinson?s experience pain are the neck, upper back and extremities. In Parkinson?s, neuropathic pain is less common than nociceptive pain, and includes a number of conditions not directly related to PD, such as shingles, cancer pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, and peripheral neuropathy. The pain may present as burning, numbness and tingling, sharp sensations, or electric shock qualities. Pain due to nerve or root disease is most commonly caused by akathisia, an extreme inner restlessness. Parkinson?s specialists gain insight from the perspective of the pain specialist, and often select treatments based on the nociceptive versus neuropathic classification. In practical terms, it often proves helpful to conceptualize the experience of pain in Parkinson?s as relating to one or more of the following five categories: pain from the muscles or skeleton, pain from nerves or spinal roots, pain related to sustained twisting or writhing, discomfort from akathisia and pain caused directly by changes in chemicals in the brain due to Parkinson?s. The Impact of Pain It is important to address pain because it may interfere with day-to-day activities, mood, sleep and overall enjoyment of life. Specific problems resulting from chronic pain may include sleep disturbance, malnutrition, social withdrawal, physical and functional decline, depression, anxiety and impaired cognition. Pain also accounts for increased overall health care costs. A person?s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. Scientists have shown that depression, which affects approximately 40 percent of individuals diagnosed with Parkinson?s, plays an important role in the way people perceive pain. Similarly, tension and muscle stress caused by anxiety can compound pain. Cognitive processes ? how a person views pain and how he or she pays attention to it ? also influence the level of pain a person feels. A person who pays more attention to his or her pain and reacts to pain with a high level of stress will likely experience more pain than someone who tries to ignore the pain and considers it irrelevant to his or her daily life. Feeling helpless to control pain ? that is, believing that pain is uncontrollable or that there are no treatment options or health professionals available to assist in managing pain ? can also make pain seem worse. Fortunately, many options exist for treating pain. How can you find which are right for you? The first step is to talk to your doctor who can assess your pain and then help to build a pain management plan. Assessing and Managing Pain Your doctor can assess pain through a clinical interview and neurological examination, sometimes performed in both the unmedicated state and when the Parkinson?s medications are working fully. Your doctor may also ask you to describe the characteristics of your pain. For example, when do you feel pain? Where in the body is your pain? Does the pain feel hot or cold, stabbing or burning? You also may be asked to report how pain impacts your daily activities ? for example, walking or sleeping. The more information you can provide about your pain, the better your doctor will be able to diagnose and treat it. Management options for pain in Parkinson?s include both the pharmacological (i.e., medications) and the non-pharmacological. A combination of both may offer the best pain control, and an interdisciplinary model of care can lead to optimal results for pain management. Some treatment options include: medications physical therapy massage botulin toxin injections nutrition management exercise acupuncture/acupressure psychotherapy (emphasis on pain management) stretching Because of the relationship between dopamine and pain, dopaminergic medications such as levodopa can affect a person?s perception of pain. People with Parkinson?s who are in the ?on? levodopa state, when the medication is at peak effectiveness, report less pain than those in the ?off? state. Pain due to rigidity or dystonia can be relieved by dopamine drugs, but on the other hand, may cause dyskinesias. Therefore, effective management of levodopa medication for people with Parkinson?s may help to reduce pain. Because certain thought processes and behaviors can alleviate or worsen pain, some people find psychotherapy helpful for managing their pain. Techniques such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (helping to control the psychological response to pain; teaching diaphragmatic breathing, visual imagery exercises, relaxation techniques, etc.), and biofeedback may help ease pain, but are unlikely to eliminate it completely. A physical therapist can help you select and modify appropriate exercise routines. Of course, you should avoid activities or exercises that make your pain worse.
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Sir I am over weight I got thyroid issue I am taking medicine for that as well still my weight is increasing plus all my bone's are paining I am not able to pick my one year daughter as well. Sleeping disorder as well. Kindly help.

MBBS, DNB (General Medicine)
General Physician, Delhi
Please check your vit. D3 level , S. Ca, BMD, for osteoporosis,and also TSH level and get back to me.
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