Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Sudarshan Reddy

Anesthesiologist, Hyderabad

0 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Sudarshan Reddy Anesthesiologist, Hyderabad
0 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Sudarshan Reddy
Dr. Sudarshan Reddy is an experienced Anesthesiologist in Malakpet, Hyderabad. You can visit him at Yashoda Hopitals in Malakpet, Hyderabad. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Sudarshan Reddy on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Anesthesiologists from across India. You will find Anesthesiologists with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Anesthesiologists online in Hyderabad and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Sudarshan Reddy

Yashoda Hopitals

#16-10-29, Nalgonda X Roads , Malakpet. Landmark: Near Nalgonda Cross Bus Stop, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
...more

Yashoda Hospitals

#16-10-29, Nalgonda X Roads , Malakpet. Landmark: Near Nalgonda Cross Bus Stop.Hyderabad Get Directions
0 at clinic
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Sudarshan Reddy

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I am 22 year old, My doctor told me its a muscular pain but it is not going from 4-5 months. Afterwards I visited pain management center they told me its a myofascial pain in chest. Does myofascial pain totally goes away?

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
I am 22 year old,
My doctor told me its a muscular pain but it is not going from 4-5 months.
Afterwards I visited pai...
Dear lybrateuser, - Myofascial pain is a referred pain usually caused by the repeated use of a muscle which is the trigger point - to avoid it one has to identify the trigger point - to get relief you can take physical therapy, pain relief tablets, if still no relief then injectibles in the trigger point - the problem has to be prevented & will return if precaution is not taken.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am a 35 years old and have body pains for last 2 weeks. What should I do for this?

BHMS
Homeopath, Sindhudurg
I am a 35 years old and have body pains for last 2 weeks. What should I do for this?
Homoeopathic treatment- mag phos 6x -4 pills 3 times calcivita syrup 2 spoonful 3 time. For 8 days and revert back.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am having Pain in my Right Knee for about 3 weeks, I have taken pain killers but the pain is continuing. I wake up with a stiff knee and it becomes better after walking for some time. Again at office when I have to work for 3-4 hours at my System and get up It is very difficult to walk. Kindly help.

BHMS
Homeopath, Sindhudurg
I am having Pain in my Right Knee for about 3 weeks, I have taken pain killers but the pain is continuing. I wake up ...
Homoepathic treatment mag phos 30x 4pills 3 times calc fluor 30x 4pills 3 times iar arthritis 20 drops 3 times muscuheal oil twice daily for 8 days and revert back for further treatment.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, I have lot of lower back pain. And leg pain on my left leg. Can not sit for long. tiredness all day. Headache. Bum pain. Lot of pain. Please advise.

Bachelor of physiotherapy
Physiotherapist, Kolkata
Hi, I have lot of lower back pain. And leg pain on my left leg. Can not sit for long. tiredness all day. Headache. Bu...
Hi lybrate-user do exercise regularly. Stretching regular basis. Use consentration exercise 2time in aday. Consult me after 5days.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 19years old from last 2 week I am having calf pain I have tried several lotion for my pain but still its pain a lot what should I do?

MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
I am 19years old from last 2 week I am having calf pain I have tried several lotion for my pain but still its pain a ...
Keep your leg raised while sitting or lying quadriceps strengthening exercises hamstring stretching calf muscles stretching contrast bath.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have pain on my back and little swelling too then what is this disease please tell me I am worried about that.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Navi Mumbai
I have pain on my back and little swelling too then what is this disease please tell me I am worried about that.
this back pain is due to no back exercise.... due to this muscle get stiff .... when suddenly you get move fast that time this stiff muscle get break and pain start..... in ayurved there is mentioned one procedure KATI BASTI ....DO THIS FOR FIVE DAYS WITH MEDICATED OIL if you want to do it you should do it under doctor observation .... so consult ayurvedic doctor near you ... you will definitely get good result ..
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir my right knee (ACL) ligament was tore while playing. So I took treatment and get it reconstruct through a doctor. He inserted screw in knee. Now 10th month is going on after operations. But still I am having pain in my knee when I sit in latrine. Specially after running or if I stand for more than an hour. I did many exercises also for this. I am in army so I have to do hard work. Please advise me some medicine or exercise s to overcome this stiffness of knee. In running I have no problem but I have problem in fully bend of leg.

MD - Anaesthesiology
Anesthesiologist, Anand
Sir my right knee (ACL) ligament was tore while playing. So I took treatment and get it reconstruct through a doctor....
Lybrate-user your weight acording to your height is normal. So pain must b because of some damage to the cartilage of knee joint due to tear of acl. First of all stop using indian toilets. Start useing western toilet. Do not bend your knee more than 90 degree as far as possible. Do some strengthening exe of quadriceps nd halmstring.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome - How Physiotherapy Can Help You?

Master in Physiotherapy
Physiotherapist, Rajouri
Cubital Tunnel Syndrome  - How Physiotherapy Can Help You?

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is also known as Ulnar Neuropathy, a nerve compression syndrome where the Ulnar nerve, also known as the funny bone nerve, gets compressed due to heightened pressure or stretching. It can lead to numbness or a tingling sensation in little and ring fingers, sometimes pain in forearm and an overall weakness in the hand. Ulnar nerve is one of the three main nerves in the arm. It runs in a groove on the inner side of the elbow. Since it travels through a narrow space and has very little protective tissue, the nerve is quite vulnerable to compression


Symptoms:
The symptoms of this condition may range from mild to severe. Some of the mild symptoms include:

    1. Numbness in little and ring finger as the fingers fall asleep
    2. A tingling sensation, usually like the pinch of pins and needles in ring and little finger
    3. Pain in forearm
    4. Weakness in the hand
    5. Some of the severe symptoms include:
    6. Reduction in overall hand grip
    7. A claw like deformity in hand
    8. Wasting of muscles of the hand

    Bending elbow over a long period of time like while using cell phone or during sleep can cause ulnar nerve compression. Resting the elbow for a long period over a hard surface can also cause an irritation of the nerve, leading to such symptoms. In some cases, the nerve snaps back and forth over a bony bump, resulting in an irritated nerve.People People who undertake intense physical activity, especially using their arms, are more likely to develop this problem. Eg. baseball pitchers. Apart from this, people who have suffered from a dislocated elbow or have arthritis are also at risk.
    Generally, doctors diagnose this condition through the symptoms. However, nerve tests are also conducted to check the level of nerve compression. Electromyography is a procedure in which electrodes are placed on the skin and muscles to measure muscle health. Determining muscle health and level of compression helps decide the mode of treatment.Generally, Generally, the symptoms of cubital tunnel syndrome are managed through a conservative treatment. However, in cases of severe compression, surgery can be considered as an option to relieve pressure, moving nerve to the front of the elbow or removing a part of the bone
    For mild cases, a towel or a protective cover for elbow is recommended. The towel should be wrapped around the elbow loosely. An elbow splint can be worn at night to protect the elbow from being bent for long time
     

  1. How can a physical therapist help?
    A physiotherapist has an essential role to play in treatment of this syndrome. A therapist can help the patient to learn ways of avoiding pressure to the nerve. After surgery, with restrictions of movement, a therapist can help achieve smooth recovery and movement of the elbow. Your physical therapist will determine the activities that bring on your symptoms. The recommendations at this point will be to avoid those activities for a time. Remember, the nerve is irritated and at times swollen. If the irritation and swelling are reduced, the symptoms should resolve.If If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you canconsult a physiotherapist.

1 person found this helpful

60% of Back Pain in Humans Is Due to Disc

MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
60% of Back Pain in Humans Is Due to Disc

THE INTERVERTEBRAL DISC

At its simplest, the spine gets most of its movement from each cotton reel sitting on its discal pillow and careening about in all directions.The back compartment has to control the movement.The intervertebral discs are the pillows and they are vital to the spine. Their high bursting pressure thrusts the vertebrae apart while at the same time gluing them together. Each has a vigorous incompressibility, like standing on a breadboard balanced on a beach ball. They give the spine aquivering up-thrusting romp which makes it whippy a light so it can tip around freely in the air without flopping over like a broken reed.Each disc consists of a squirting liquid centre called the nucleus and a tough meshed outer wall called the annulus fibrosis. The annulus in turn is made up of approximately twelve thin fibrous layers (called lamellae) which make up the wall. 

For maximum strength in bending, each successive lamella is made of fibers running in diagonally opposing directions,like the walls of a radial car tyre. This creates a tenacious multi-layered tubular lattice running around the rim of the disc which is bonded strongly to the vertebrae above and below. 

Thus the disc wall not only holds the vertebrae firmly together; it also keeps the nucleus under pressure.The lamellae at the back of the disc are even thinner and bunched closely together. 

This gives the inter space more freedom to pull apart so the spine can bend forward-its most frequent act-but it also means it is weaker, introducing a precarious trade-off between freedom to bend and the possibility that over-bending could break down the wall.Often the L5 discs are kidney-shaped, which exposes a longer flank and increases the holding power of the back wall. 

However , kidney-shaped discs have the disadvantage of rankling more inthe acute back corners when torsion strains are applied to the disc. You will see later how heavy duty lifting and twisting actions can make the wall perish at these points.

The nucleus of the disc has a unique molecular make-up which allows it to attract fluid to keep itself hydrated under pressure. (when healthy nuclear material is taken from a disc and set in a saucer of fluid it swells by 300 percent). This powerful attractive force from the nucleus maintains the high pressures within the disc so it is not squashed dry, as a normal sponge would be, by the powerful and ever-present forces bearing down upon it.When a disc is young,the nucleus is nearly 90 percent water but as it gets older it is less able to hold it. Even so, the strong suction on water creates very high intradiscal pressures. 

Apart from making the disc unsquashable, it forces the disc walls outwards, which has ingenious benefits for the spine. The strength of the walls fighting back against the outward force stiffens them and gives each link between the vertebrae invaluable tensile strength. 

This dynamically braces each link and keeps the spine taut all the way down its length.In the world of physics, a disc operating like this is called an ‘hydraulic sack’. Compression of a contained fluid results in forces being distributed outwards and evenly in all directions through that fluid. In the realm of backs, this is very important and the fluid content of any disc is very critical to its high performance.

Our vertical posture enhances the tensile strength of the spine. It adds to the pressurizing of the fluid sucks and converts the spine into a spring –loaded rod which can flip up straight again after bending. 

Without these tensile properties, the human back would not be the long slender thing it is. We would need a hugely bulky muscular apparatus to haul us up straight again once we had doubled over.But vertical posture does have its down side. It means the segments at the bottom of the stack get squashed by carrying so much weight. Compression down through the spine is the single most important cause of low back pain.

View All Feed