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Dr. Sharmila Majumdar - Sexologist, Hyderabad

Dr. Sharmila Majumdar

97 (1535 ratings)
MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification),...

Sexologist, Hyderabad

12 Years Experience  ·  2500 at clinic  ·  ₹2500 online
Dr. Sharmila Majumdar 97% (1535 ratings) MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Beha... Sexologist, Hyderabad
12 Years Experience  ·  2500 at clinic  ·  ₹2500 online
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I want all my patients to be well informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment modality and services....more
I want all my patients to be well informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment modality and services.
More about Dr. Sharmila Majumdar

Hyderabad-based Dr. Sharmila Majumdar is one of first certified female sexologist in India. A state and national award winner in Sexology and Psychoanalysis in 2017. She did her MS in sexology from KUVEMPU in the year 2006, M.Phil in Clinical Psychology from Bharathiar University in 2008 and she completed her Ph.D. in behaviour modification from Osmania University in 2010. She did her fellowship in Treatment of Resistant Depression from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, U.S.A. She has gained her expertise in the fields of Sexology, Mental health Psychology and Cognitive consultant. She has gathered a vast experience over 11 years by undertaking crucial responsibilities in various hospitals. She managed the chairs of Sr. Consultant Psychoanalyst & Sexologist at Asha Psychiatric Hospital, Sr. Consultant sexologist at Tanvir Hospital For Women and Sr. Consultant Sexologist at Ramayya Pramila Urology & Laparoscopy Hospital.

She won laurels for Best paper presentation on female Sexual Dysfunction. Dr. Majumdar is the member of various medical societies like American Association of Sexuality Educators Counsellors and Therapists (AASECT) and Council of Sex Education & Parenthood International (CSEPI) etc. She extends her valuable services in curing various sexual disorders and ailments like Gonorrhea, Syphilis, Genital Herpes, Erectile Dysfunction, Loss of libido, swelling of scrotum, Vasectomy etc. Now she is the Owner, Chief Sexologist and Psychoanalyst at Avis Hospital, Sexual and Mental Health Clinic, Hyderabad, Telangana.

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Education
MS Human Sexuality - KUVEMPU - 2006
M.Phil Clinical Psychology - Bharathiar University - 2008
PhD (Behaviour Modification) - Osmnia University - 2010
...more
Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression - Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NYC, U.S.A - 2010
Past Experience
Sr. Consultant Psychoanalyst & Sexologist. at Asha Psychiatric Hospital
Sr. Consultant sexologist at Tanvir Hospital For Women
Sr. Consultant Sexologist at Ramiyah Pramila Urology & Laproscopic Hospital
...more
Director and Chief consultant Sexologist and psychoanalyst at Sexual and mental health clinic, Avis Hospital
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Telugu
...more
W-Bengali
Awards and Recognitions
Best female sexologist in Telengana, Hyderabad
Best Paper Presentation In Female Sexual Dysfunction
Most promising female health care doctor in Sexology and Psychoanalysis
Professional Memberships
American Association of Sexuality Educators Counselors and Therapists (AASECT)
Member andrology India

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Avis Hospital, Sexual & Mental Health Clinic

Plot No-99, Road No-1, Jubilee Hills, Next To Chiranjivee Blood BankHyderabad Get Directions
  4.9  (1535 ratings)
2500 at clinic
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"knowledgeable" 169 reviews "Practical" 33 reviews "Sensible" 38 reviews "Professional" 34 reviews "Very helpful" 195 reviews "Saved my life" 13 reviews "Well-reasoned" 40 reviews "Caring" 50 reviews "Prompt" 12 reviews "Thorough" 14 reviews "Inspiring" 20 reviews "Nurturing" 5 reviews "Helped me impr..." 23 reviews

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My news byte on std telecasted on DD yadgiri News channel today noon, retelecast will be today evening at 6.45 pm

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
My news byte on std telecasted on DD yadgiri News channel today noon, retelecast will be today evening at 6.45 pm

felling humbled!

Everything You Need To Know About PCOD

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Everything You Need To Know About PCOD

Everything you need to know about Polycystic Ovarian Disorder (PCOD)PCOD affects almost 17 percent of Indian women.

PCOD in India

This hormonal imbalance affects many women in India. A pan India survey was recently conducted by the Metropolis Healthcare Ltd, on 27,411 samples of testosterone over a period of 18 months. Out of these 27,411 samples, around 4,824, (17.60 percent) of the females faced hormonal risks including polycystic ovarian syndrome.

What is Polycystic Ovary Disease (PCOD)?

Polycystic Ovary Disease (PCOD), is a condition where a woman develops enlarged ovaries and small follicular cysts that are of the diameter 0.5-1.0 cm. This leads to a collection of eggs in the ovary that cannot be discharged from the body. “A woman with PCOD will also have symptoms that reflect imbalances in reproductive and other hormones. Here, the ovaries make more androgens (male hormones) than normal. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation."

pcosss_1441095494.jpg The following symptoms of PCOD, which large affects women of all age groups and may vary:

  • In adolescent women, PCOD symptoms include infrequent, absent, and/or irregular menstrual periods and hairfall.
  • In reproductive age group, women face fertility issues, requiring assistance in form of fertility treatments. In fact, PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility.
  • Hirsutism— increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes.
  • Cysts in the ovaries can also cause acne, oily skin, or dandruff.
  • It may also lead to weight gain or obesity, usually with extra weight around the waist and male-pattern baldness or thinning of hair.
  • One may also notice patches of skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs that are thick and dark brown or black skin tags — excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area.

"Changes in lifestyle, lack of exercise, dietary habits, exposure to environmental pollution, stress levels and loss of work life balance have become the primary causes of PCOD which can also lead to hypertension, diabetes mellitus, increased risk of uterine cancer and even cardiovascular diseases," she says.

Remedies for PCOD

Experts suggest that if symptoms are identified at an early age and brought under control, it can help reduce the chances of having complications like diabetes and heart disease. "However, the primary steps are eating right, exercising and not smoking.

#1 Lifestyle modification

"Many women with PCOD are overweight or obese, which can resultantly cause many health problems. The way to manage PCOD is by eating healthy and exercising to keep weight at a healthy level,". You can do the following:

  • Limiting processed foods and foods with added sugars
  • Add more whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats to your diet. "This helps to lower blood glucose (sugar) levels, improve the body's use of insulin, and normalise hormone levels in your body. Even a 10 percent loss in body weight can restore a normal period and make your cycle more regular," she says.

#2 Dietary changes

  • Avoid foods laden with too much sugar. Remember that the worst offenders are soft drinks, cookies, cakes, chocolate, sweets, and processed breakfast cereals.
  • Avoid foods containing unhealthy sugar compounds such as high-fructose corn syrup.
  • Increase the consumption of vegetables and include a minimum of five servings of vegetables daily.
  • Limit processed grain-based foods such as boxed breakfast cereals, white bread, and pasta and choose small amounts of whole grain alternatives.

breakfast-991821_1280.jpgYou must include whole grains in your daily diet to make up for the needed amount of protein

  • Fiber contributes to improved blood sugar control and healthy bowel function. Aim to eat 25-30 grams of fiber per day.
  • Protein helps balance your blood sugar and can help tame a sweet tooth. Include fresh fish, lean red meat, organic chicken, organic eggs, whole grains, and legumes in your diet, which are all good sources of protein.
  • The type of fat in your diet plays an important role in assisting with insulin reception at the cell level. Use cold-water fish, organic eggs, avocados, extra virgin olive oil, and raw nuts and seeds that are rich in essential fatty acids.
  • Ensure you eat regularly and choose healthy snacks mid-morning and mid-afternoon to balance your blood sugar levels between meals.
  • Also make sure you add fruit, nuts, seeds and natural yogurt- all make for healthy snacks.

#3 Birth control pills

You can also ask your gyneacologist if you can include birth control pills and if so, which one's suit you best. For women who don't want to get pregnant, birth control pills are extremely helpful. They do the following:

  • Control menstrual cycles
  • Reduce male hormone levels
  • Help to clear acne

#4 Diabetes medications

"The medicine Metformin (Glucophage) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin affects the way insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) and lowers testosterone production. It slows the growth of abnormal hair and, after a few months of use, may help ovulation to return,"

She adds that recent research has shown Metformin to have other positive effects, such as decreased body mass and improved cholesterol levels. "Metformin will not cause a person to become diabetic,"

#5 Surgery

Ovarian drilling is a surgery that may increase the chance of ovulation. It's sometimes used when a woman does not respond to fertility medicines.

#6 Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones

"Medicines called anti-androgens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (speer-on-oh-LAK-tone) (Aldactone), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce PCOD. These medications should not be taken if you are trying to become pregnant," says. She lists a few other options:

  • Vaniqa cream to reduce facial hair
  • Laser hair removal or electrolysis to remove hair
  • Hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing

She adds that some research has also shown that bariatric (weight loss) surgery may be effective in resolving PCOD in morbidly obese women (BMI of more than 40).

#7 Fertility medications

"Lack of ovulation is usually the reason for fertility problems in women with PCOD. Several medications that stimulate ovulation can help women with PCOD become pregnant. Even so, other reasons for infertility in both the woman and man should be ruled out before fertility medications are used. Also, some fertility medications increase the risk for multiple births (twins, triplets).

She lists the following treatment options:

  • Clomiphene (Clomid, Serophene): The first choice therapy to stimulate ovulation for most patients.
  • Metformin taken with clomiphene: This may be tried if clomiphene alone fails. The combination may help women with PCOS ovulate on lower doses of medication.
  • Gonadotropins: It is given as shots, but are more expensive and raise the risk of multiple births compared to clomiphene.

Another option is in vitro fertilisation (IVF), which offers the best chance of becoming pregnant in any given cycle. It also gives doctors better control over the chance of multiple births.

Most women have symptoms that are normally associated with menopause. "These include hot flushes, vaginal dryness, irritability, night sweats, or difficulty sleeping. Menstrual periods may be sporadic or stop completely. Some women may never begin having menstrual periods and may not go through the normal sequence of puberty,".

She adds that while PCOD does pose a problem with respect to fertility, it must be noted that it is not incurable.

6 people found this helpful

Fertility And Infertility

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Fertility And Infertility

Fertility is the ability to conceive and have children. Most of us take our fertility for granted but the process of reproduction is complex and sometimes couples experience difficulties when they try to have a baby.

If you are planning to have a baby there are some things you and your partner can do to improve your chance of conceiving and having a healthy baby.

Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months or more of unprotected intercourse. About one in nine couples experience fertility difficulties. There are many reasons for this, some relating to the male partner and some to the female partner. If you suspect an infertility problem , talk to your Sexologist, infertility specialist who will guide you through the steps of an infertility investigation.

For people who have been diagnosed with cancer, fertility preservation is an important consideration if there is a chance that their cancer treatment may affect their fertility. 

Increasingly, fertility preservation is now also being used for non-medical purposes. Egg freezing for social reasons has seen a rise in demand in recent years.

Suspecting infertility

Most people take their fertility for granted and do not expect to have problems conceiving. However, one in nine couples experience fertility difficulties.

What to do if you suspect a problem

If you have been trying to conceive for a year or more, it is time to seek medical advice. If you are over 35, you should see a doctor if you have been trying to conceive for six months or more.

The first point of contact should be your general practitioner (GP) who will start an infertility investigation. This involves a detailed medical history and a physical examination of both partners and some basic tests to make sure that the woman is ovulating and that the man produces sperm. If everything seems in order, your GP may advise you to keep trying for a little longer before consulting a fertility specialist. However, if your test results indicate a problem, your doctor will refer you to a fertility specialist without delay. The fertility specialist will do more tests to establish the cause of infertility and determine the type of treatment  you may need. 

Causes of infertility

There are many reasons why pregnancy does not occur. About one third of infertility cases are due to male factors and one third due to female factors. Sometimes both partners have a fertility problem. In about 20 per cent of cases, there is no apparent cause of infertility, so called unexplained or idiopathic infertility. As more couples delay childbearing age-related infertility is becoming more common.

Dealing with infertility

A diagnosis of infertility often comes as a shock. It is unexpected and unwelcome and emotionally challenging. Unlike other adverse life events, which may have a clear resolution, infertility is uniquely distressing because it can last for many years and the outcome is uncertain. Some people find it helpful to discuss their feelings with a psychologist or counsellor. Others feel better if they take action by starting treatment.

What to do next

Once the cause of infertility has been pin-pointed, your doctor will discuss treatment options with you. These will vary depending on the cause of infertility but will most likely involve some form of assisted reproductive treatment . You need a referral from your GP to see a fertility specialist. Your GP may recommend a fertility specialist, unless you have a preference for a particular ART clinics or individual fertility specialist.

The chance of ART treatment working has greatly improved since the late seventies when the first IVF baby was born. Although your chance of having a baby with ART depends largely on factors that are beyond your control, there are some things that you can do to improve the odds. The lifestyle factors that influence the chance of natural conception for both men and women also affect your chance of ART success.

Understanding reproduction

It is useful to understand how eggs and sperm are normally formed, and how conception occurs to understand the causes of infertility and how they are targeted in ART.

The hormones which control the production of sperm and eggs are called gonadotrophins. There are two types of gonadotrophins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSA) and luteinising hormone (LH). In men, they stimulate the testicles to produce sperm and testosterone. In women, they act on the ovaries, where the eggs develop. The female sex hormones, oestrogen and progesterone, are produced by the ovaries when eggs mature and are released (ovulation).

The production of sex hormones and the release of an egg is known as the menstrual cycle. It is counted from the first day of the period until the day before the start of the next period. In an average cycle of 28 days, ovulation happens on day 14. However, 

And it is important to note that ovulation occurs earlier in women with shorter cycles and later in women with longer cycles.

Your fertility and timing 

  • Sperm are produced at the rate of about 300 million per day. They take some 80 days to mature. Each sperm has a head, which contains the genetic material, and a tail, which propels it up through the vagina, uterus, and Fallopian tubes where the
  • Conception occurs when an egg and a sperm come together. At ovulation, an egg is released from the ovary into the fallopian tube. If sperm is present at that time, the egg can be fertilised. The fertilised egg then starts to divide and becomes an embryo. After ovulation, the ovary produces progesterone which prepares the lining of the uterus - the endometrium - for the growing embryo. If an embryo does not form or attach to the endometrium (implantation), the level of progesterone drops and the next period starts.
  • A few days after implantation, the embryo starts to produce Human Chorionic Gonadotrophins (HCG) - the hormone that gives a positive pregnancy test reading.
  • Conception occurs when an egg and a sperm come together. At ovulation, an egg is released from the ovary into the fallopian tube. If sperm is present at that time, the egg can be fertilised. The fertilised egg then starts to divide and becomes an embryo. After ovulation, the ovary produces progesterone which prepares the lining of the uterus - the endometrium - for the growing embryo. If an embryo does not form or attach to the endometrium (implantation), the level of progesterone drops and the next period starts.
  • A few days after implantation, the embryo starts to produce Human Chorionic Gonadotrophins (HCG) - the hormone that gives a positive pregnancy test reading.
3 people found this helpful

Zinc And It s Importance In Male Fertility

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Zinc And It s Importance In Male Fertility

Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent finding.

Sperm, which holds the male DNA, must be able to move back and forth and propel itself to penetrate the female egg. Fertile males have healthy sperm that swim well, but males with impaired fertility may have a lower sperm count, or sperm that do not swim as well. Zinc may play a role in the development and overall quality and quantity of sperm.

Zinc has antioxidative properties and plays an important role in scavenging reactive oxygen species. We hypothesized that in the absence of Zn, the possibility of increased oxidative damage exists that would contribute to poor sperm quality. Therefore, measurement of seminal Zn in the seminal plasma of males with a history of subfertility or idiopathic infertility is necessary and can be helpful in fertility assessment.

Zinc Basics

The mineral zinc is naturally present in certain foods, and it is added to other foods. The National Institutes of Health notes that zinc is involved in immune function, wound healing, protein synthesis, DNA synthesis and cell division. Zinc is the second most common trace mineral in the body, behind iron, and is present in every cell in the body. Males 14 years and up need 11 milligrams of zinc per day -- an amount easily obtained through a healthy diet plus a multivitamin.

Sperm Development

Zinc may play an important role in the development of sperm, also known as spermatogenesis. A 2009 a study published on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences website found that the concentration of zinc in the testes increases during spermatogenesis. The study also found that zinc deficiencies reduced sperm motility. The study concluded that zinc is a vital mineral in the development of sperm and the regulation of sperm motility. Still, the extent of zinc's role in spermatogenesis is not fully understood.

Deficiencies and Infertility

A 2009 study published in "Nutrition Research" hypothesized that due to zinc's important antioxidant role, a deficiency would increase oxidative damage and promote lower quality sperm. The study found that seminal zinc, in both fertile and infertile males, correlated significant with sperm count. The conclusion was that zinc deficiency is, in fact, a risk factor for low sperm quality and male infertility, for which there is no other apparent cause.

Zinc Plus Folate

A 2002 study published in "Fertility and Sterility" tested the effects of zinc plus the vitamin folate on fertility-impaired males. The study found that while zinc and folate, each on their own, did not improve sperm count, when combined, the two supplements significantly improved sperm count, as well as the percentage of healthy sperm, in fertility-impaired males. Another study published in the "International Journal of Andrology" also found benefits in combining zinc and folate on fertility-impaired males.

In conclusion zinc is an important element required for healthy sperms and male fertility.

8 people found this helpful

Most promising woman health care Sexologist and psychoanalyst Of 2017

MS Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad

STD Testing: What's Right For You?

MS sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (behaviour modification), Certified in Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
STD Testing: What's Right For You?

Sexually transmitted diseases are common, but the types of STD testing you need may vary by your risk factors. Find out what's recommended for you.

If you're sexually active, particularly with multiple partners, you've probably heard the following advice many times: Use protection and get tested.
This is important because a person can have a sexually transmitted disease without knowing it. In many cases, there aren't any signs or symptoms. In fact, that's why many experts prefer the term sexually transmitted infections (STIs), because you can have an infection without disease symptoms.

But what types of STI testing do you need? And how often should you be screened? The answers depend on your age, your sexual behaviors and other risk factors.If you think you need STI testing, request it from your doctor. Talk to your doctor about your concerns and what tests you'd like or need.

Testing for specific STIs
Here are some guidelines for STI testing for specific sexually transmitted infections.
Chlamydia and gonorrhea
Get screened annually if:

  • You're a sexually active woman under age 25
  • You're a woman older than 25 and at risk of STIs — for example, if you're having sex with a new partner or multiple partners
  • You're a man who has sex with men
  • You have HIV
  • You've been forced to have intercourse or engage in sexual activity against your will

Chlamydia and gonorrhea screening is done either through a urine test or through a swab inside the penis in men or from the cervix in women. The sample is then analyzed in a laboratory. Screening is important, because if you don't have signs or symptoms, you can be unaware that you have either infection.

HIV, syphilis and hepatitis
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages HIV testing, at least once, as a routine part of medical care if you're an adolescent or adult between the ages of 13 and 64. Younger teens should be tested if they have a high risk of an STI. The CDC advises yearly HIV testing if you are at high risk of infection.
Hepatitis C screening is recommended for everyone born between 1945 and 1965. The incidence of hepatitis C is high in this age group, and the disease often has no symptoms until it's advanced. Vaccines are available for both hepatitis A and B if screening shows you haven't been exposed to these viruses.

Request testing for HIV, syphilis and hepatitis if you:

  • Test positive for another STI, which puts you at greater risk of other STIs
  • Have had more than one sexual partner (or if your partner has had multiple partners) since your last test
  • Use intravenous (IV) drugs
  • Are a man who has sex with men
  • Are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant
  • Have been forced to have intercourse or engage in sexual activity against your will

Your doctor tests you for syphilis by taking either a blood sample or a swab from any genital sores you might have. The sample is examined in a laboratory. A blood sample is taken to test for HIV and hepatitis.

Genital herpes
No good screening test exists for herpes, a viral infection that can be transmitted even when a person doesn't have symptoms. Your doctor may take a tissue scraping or culture of blisters or early ulcers, if you have them, for examination in a laboratory. But a negative test doesn't rule out herpes as a cause for genital ulcerations.
A blood test also may help detect a past herpes infection, but results aren't always conclusive. Some blood tests can help differentiate between the two main types of the herpes virus. Type 1 is the virus that more typically causes cold sores, although it can also cause genital sores.
Type 2 is the virus that causes genital sores more often. Still, the results may not be totally clear, depending on the sensitivity of the test and the stage of the infection. False-positive and false-negative results are possible.

HPV
Certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer while other varieties of HPV can cause genital warts. Many sexually active people become infected with HPV at some point in their lives, but never develop symptoms. The virus typically disappears within two years.
There's no routinely used HPV screening test for men, in whom the infection is diagnosed by visual inspection or biopsy of genital warts. In women, HPV testing involves:

  • Pap test. Pap tests, which check the cervix for abnormal cells, are recommended every three years for women between ages 21 and 65.
  • HPV test. Women over 30 may be offered the option to have the HPV test along with a Pap test every five years if previous tests were normal. Women between 21 and 30 will be given an HPV test if they've had abnormal results on their Pap test.

HPV has also been linked to cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, and mouth and throat. Vaccines can protect both men and women from some types of HPV, but they are most effective when administered before sexual activity begins.

Positive test results

If you test positive for an STI, the next step is to consider further testing and then get treatment as recommended by your doctor. In addition, inform your sex partners. Your partners need to be evaluated and treated, because you can pass some infections back and forth.
Expect to feel various emotions. You may feel ashamed, angry or afraid. It may help to remind yourself that you've done the right thing by getting tested so that you can inform your partners and get treated. Talk with your doctor about your concerns right away.

Low Desire Disorder In Women

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Low Desire Disorder In Women

A woman's sexual desire naturally fluctuates over the years. Highs and lows commonly coincide with the beginning or end of a relationship or with major life changes, such as pregnancy, menopause or illness. Some antidepressants and anti-seizure medications also can cause low sex drive in women.

If you have a persistent or recurrent lack of interest in sex that causes you personal distress, you may have hypoactive sexual desire disorder — also referred to as female sexual interest/arousal disorder.
But you don't have to meet this medical definition to seek help. If you are bothered by a low sex drive or decreased sexual desire, there are lifestyle changes and sex techniques that may put you in the mood more often. Some medications may offer promise as well. 
If you want to have sex less often than your partner does, neither one of you is necessarily outside the norm for people at your stage in life — although your differences, also known as desire discrepancy, may cause distress.
Similarly, even if your sex drive is weaker than it once was, your relationship may be stronger than ever. Bottom line: There is no magic number to define low sex drive. It varies from woman to woman.

Some signs and symptoms that may indicate a low sex drive include a woman who:
* Has no interest in any type of sexual activity, including self-stimulation
* Doesn't have sexual fantasies or thoughts, or only seldom has them
* Is bothered by her lack of sexual activity or fantasies
When to see a Doctor specializing in sexual health.
If you're bothered by your low desire for sex, talk to your doctor. The solution could be as simple as changing the type of antidepressant you take.

Causes

A woman's desire for sex is based on a complex interaction of many components affecting intimacy, including physical well-being, emotional well-being, experiences, beliefs, lifestyle and current relationship. If you're experiencing a problem in any of these areas, it can affect your sexual desire.

Physical causes
A wide range of illnesses, physical changes and medications can cause a low sex drive, including:
* Sexual problems. If you experience pain during sex or an inability to orgasm, it can hamper your desire for sex.
* Medical diseases. Numerous nonsexual diseases can also affect desire for sex, including arthritis, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and neurological diseases.
* Medications. Many prescription medications — including some antidepressants and anti-seizure medications — are notorious libido killers.
* Lifestyle habits. A glass of wine may make you feel amorous, but too much alcohol can spoil your sex drive; the same is true of street drugs. And smoking decreases blood flow, which may dampen arousal.
* Surgery. Any surgery, especially one related to your breasts or your genital tract, can affect your body image, sexual function and desire for sex.
* Fatigue. Exhaustion from caring for young children or aging parents can contribute to low sex drive. Fatigue from illness or surgery also can play a role in a low sex drive.

Hormone changes
Changes in your hormone levels may alter your desire for sex. This can occur during:
* Menopause. Estrogen levels drop during the transition to menopause. This can cause decreased interest in sex and dryer vaginal tissues, resulting in painful or uncomfortable sex. Although many women continue to have satisfying sex during menopause and beyond, some women experience a lagging libido during this hormonal change.
* Pregnancy and breast-feeding. Hormone changes during pregnancy, just after having a baby and during breast-feeding can put a damper on sexual desire. Of course, hormones aren't the only factor affecting intimacy during these times. Fatigue, changes in body image, and the pressures of pregnancy or caring for a new baby can all contribute to changes in your sexual desire.

Psychological causes
Your problems don't have to be physical or biological to be real. There are many psychological causes of low sex drive, including:
* Mental health problems, such as anxiety or depression
* Stress, such as financial stress or work stress
* Poor body image
* Low self-esteem
* History of physical or sexual abuse
* Previous negative sexual experiences

Relationship issues
For many women, emotional closeness is an essential prelude to sexual intimacy. So problems in your relationship can be a major factor in low sex drive. Decreased interest in sex is often a result of ongoing issues, such as:
* Lack of connection with your partner
* Unresolved conflicts or fights
* Poor communication of sexual needs and preferences
* Infidelity or breach of trust

Treatments and drugs
Most women benefit from a treatment approach aimed at the many causes behind this condition. Recommendations may include sex education, counseling and sometimes medication.
Counseling
Talking with a sex therapist or counselor skilled in addressing sexual concerns can help with low sexual desire. Therapy often includes education about sexual response and techniques and recommendations for reading materials or couples' exercises. Couples counseling that addresses relationship issues may also help increase feelings of intimacy and desire.

Medication review
Your doctor will want to evaluate the medications you're already taking, to see if any of them tend to cause sexual side effects. For example, antidepressants such as paroxetine (Paxil, Pexeva) and fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem) may lower sex drive. Adding or switching to bupropion (Aplenzin, Wellbutrin) — a different type of antidepressant — usually improves sex drive.
Hormone therapy
Estrogen delivered throughout your whole body (systemic) by pill, patch, spray or gel can have a positive effect on brain function and mood factors that affect sexual response. But systemic estrogen therapy may have risks for certain women.
Smaller doses of estrogen — in the form of a vaginal cream or a slow-releasing suppository or ring that you place in your vagina — can increase blood flow to the vagina and help improve desire without the risks associated with systemic estrogen. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe a combination of estrogen and progesterone.
Male hormones, such as testosterone, play an important role in female sexual function, even though testosterone occurs in much lower amounts in women. However, replacing testosterone in women is controversial and it's not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for sexual dysfunction in women. Plus it can cause acne, excess body hair, and mood or personality changes.

Lifestyle and home remedies

Healthy lifestyle changes can make a big difference in your desire for sex:
* Exercise. Regular aerobic exercise and strength training can increase your stamina, improve your body image, elevate your mood and boost your libido.
* Stress less. Finding a better way to cope with work stress, financial stress and daily hassles can enhance your sex drive.
* Communicate with your partner. Couples who learn to communicate in an open, honest way usually maintain a stronger emotional connection, which can lead to better sex. Communicating about sex also is important. Talking about your likes and dislikes can set the stage for greater sexual intimacy.
* Set aside time for intimacy. Scheduling sex into your calendar may seem contrived and boring. But making intimacy a priority can help put your sex drive back on track.
* Add a little spice to your sex life. Try a different sexual position, a different time of day or a different location for sex. Ask your partner to spend more time on foreplay. If you and your partner are open to experimentation, sex toys and fantasy can help rekindle your sexual sizzle.
* Ditch bad habits. Smoking, illegal drugs and excess alcohol can all dampen sexual desire. Ditching these bad habits may help rev up your sexual desire as well as improve your overall health.    

Low sexual desire can be very difficult for you and your partner. It's natural to feel frustrated or sad if you aren't able to be as sexy and romantic as you want — or you used to be.
At the same time, low sexual desire can make your partner feel rejected, which can lead to conflicts and strife. And this type of relationship turmoil can further reduce desire for sex.

It may help to remember that fluctuations in your sexual desire are a normal part of every relationship and every stage of life. Try not to focus all of your attention on sex. Instead, spend some time nurturing yourself and your relationship.
Go for a long walk. Get a little extra sleep. Kiss your partner goodbye before you head out the door. Make a date night at your favorite restaurant. Feeling good about yourself and your partner can actually be the best foreplay.

15 people found this helpful

Relationship Between Hypertension And Erectile Dysfunction

MS Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Relationship Between Hypertension And Erectile Dysfunction

Background

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual disorder that affects all age groups and has a close association with essential hypertension.

Aim

To characterize the relation of blood pressure and ED in detail.

Methods

A cross-sectional population-based study of 45- to 70-year-old men without previously diagnosed hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, renal disease, or diabetes was conducted from 2005 to 2007 in southwestern Finland. A total of 665 men with at least one cardiovascular risk factor were studied. ED was defined by the five-item International Index of Erectile Function.

Outcomes

We found a U-shaped association between diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and prevalence of ED.

Results

The average age of the study subjects was 56 ± 6 years and 52% had ED. After adjustment for age, cohabitation status, education, fasting plasma glucose level, waist circumference, and prevalence of depressive symptoms, the curve relating DBP to the prevalence of ED was U-shaped with a nadir of DBP 90 mm Hg.

Clinical Implications

Our findings emphasize the importance of blood pressure measurement in the physical examination of men with ED.

Strengths and Limitations

This was a cross-sectional study, which prevents the evaluation of causality between ED and hypertension. However, this community-based study population is well defined and the anthropologic measurements were made by trained medical staff.

Conclusion

We found a U-shaped correlation between ED and DBP, which confirms the link between ED and hypertension.

12 people found this helpful

Know More About Erectile Dysfunction

MS Human Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
Know More About Erectile Dysfunction

If you're concerned about erectile dysfunction, talk to your Sexologist — even if you're embarrassed. Sometimes, treating an underlying condition is enough to reverse erectile dysfunction. In other cases, medications or other direct treatments might be needed.

Symptoms
Erectile dysfunction symptoms might include persistent:
* Trouble getting an erection
* Trouble keeping an erection
* Reduced sexual desire

See your Sexologist if:
* You have concerns about your erections or you're experiencing other sexual problems such as premature or delayed ejaculation, low libido. Problem with orgasm.
* You have diabetes, heart disease or another known health condition that might be linked to erectile dysfunction.

You have other symptoms along with erectile dysfunction. Male sexual arousal is a complex process that involves the brain, hormones, emotions, nerves, muscles and blood vessels. Erectile dysfunction can result from a problem with any of these. Likewise, stress and mental health concerns can cause or worsen erectile dysfunction.Sometimes a combination of physical and psychological issues causes erectile dysfunction. For instance, a minor physical condition that slows your sexual response might cause anxiety about maintaining an erection. The resulting anxiety can lead to or worsen erectile dysfunction.

Physical causes of erectile dysfunction:
In many cases, erectile dysfunction is caused by something physical. Common causes include:
* Heart disease
* Clogged blood vessels (atherosclerosis)
* High cholesterol
* High blood pressure
* Diabetes
* Obesity
* Metabolic syndrome — a condition involving increased blood pressure, high insulin levels, body fat around the waist and high cholesterol
* Parkinson's disease
* Multiple sclerosis
* Certain prescription medications
* Tobacco use
* Peyronie's disease — development of scar tissue inside the penis
* Alcoholism and other forms of substance abuse
* Sleep disorders
* Treatments for prostate cancer or enlarged prostate
* Surgeries or injuries that affect the pelvic area or spinal cord

Psychological causes of erectile dysfunction:
The brain plays a key role in triggering the series of physical events that cause an erection, starting with feelings of sexual excitement. A number of things can interfere with sexual feelings and cause or worsen erectile dysfunction. These include:
* Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions
* Stress
* Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication or other concerns.

Risk factors:
As you get older, erections might take longer to develop and might not be as firm. You might need more direct touch to your penis to get and keep an erection.
Various risk factors can contribute to erectile dysfunction, including:
* Medical conditions, particularly diabetes or heart conditions
* Tobacco use, which restricts blood flow to veins and arteries, can — over time — cause chronic health conditions that lead to erectile dysfunction
* Being overweight, especially if you're obese
* Certain medical treatments, such as prostate surgery or radiation treatment for cancer
* Injuries, particularly if they damage the nerves or arteries that control erections
* Medications, including antidepressants, antihistamines and medications to treat high blood pressure, pain or prostate conditions
* Psychological conditions, such as stress, anxiety or depression, etc. can cause low libido.
* Drug and alcohol use, especially if you're a long-term drug user or heavy drinker.

Complications:
Complications resulting from erectile dysfunction can include:
* An unsatisfactory sex life
* Stress or anxiety
* Embarrassment or low self-esteem
* Relationship problems
* The inability to get your partner pregnant

Prevention:
The best way to prevent erectile dysfunction is to see your sexual medicine specialist at the earliest the moment you detect a problem, when it’s an acute problem, but postponing a treatment may make it chronic. Also make healthy lifestyle choices and to manage any existing health conditions. 

Lifestyle :
For many men, erectile dysfunction is caused or worsened by lifestyle choices. Here are some steps that might help:
* If you smoke, quit. 
* Lose excess pounds. Being overweight can cause — or worsen — erectile dysfunction.
* Include physical activity in your daily routine. Exercise can help with underlying conditions that play a part in erectile dysfunction in a number of ways, including reducing stress, helping you lose weight and increasing blood flow.
* Get treatment for alcohol or drug problems. Drinking too much or taking certain illegal drugs can worsen erectile dysfunction directly or by causing long-term health problems.
* Work through relationship issues. Consider couples counseling if you're having trouble improving communication with your partner or working through problems on your own
* Involve your sexual partner. Your partner might see your inability to have an erection as a sign of diminished sexual interest. Your reassurance that this isn't the case can help. Communicate openly and honestly about your condition. Treatment is often more successful when a man involves his partner along with the doctor.
* Don't ignore stress, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Talk to your doctor or consult a mental health provider to address these issues.
Having a healthy sexual life is an indicator of your heart functioning well too, so do not ignore an important part of your health. Poor sexual function deteriorates the quality of life and immune system.

22 people found this helpful

What s the difference between Pleasure And Happiness?

MS Sexuality, M.Phil Clinical Psychology, PhD (Behaviour Modification), Certified In Treatment of Resistant Depression
Sexologist, Hyderabad
What s the difference between Pleasure And Happiness?

The more pleasure we seek the less happy we get. And we are endlessly being sold means of getting pleasure – because it is addictive.Pleasure means something I want because it feels good at the time, so I want more, until that ‘want’ becomes a ‘need’.

  • Happiness means contentment. You feel good and are satisfied. You don’t want or need to buy anything. Pleasure seeking, reward and desire are all linked to the trio of ‘stimulating’ neurotransmitters - dopamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin – and the more activated the more ‘want’ turns into ‘need’. 
  • This is the basis of addiction to caffeine, nicotine, cocaine, stress, gambling, video games, overeating, checking your mobile phone, facebook likes  and sex. Alcohol is the flip side of all this because it promote GABA which switches off adrenalin. This neurological highway has been hijacked to make us buy the latest iphone and check your email, Facebook and Instagram every 2 minutes, think more sugar or coffee or another drink will fill that need. The end result is we become addicted consumers and pleasure seekers and less happy as a result. 
  • Happiness is to do with the serotonin pathway which becomes depressed by the dominant over-stimulated dopamine pathway. Depressed serotonin leads to the hallmarks of 21st century living – anxiety, feeling stressed, poor sleep, carb and alcohol cravings.
  • We are sold various forms of caffeine, sugar and alcohol as the answer to happiness. Think of ‘happy hour’. Addictive substances tend to have a variable reward – they don't always work so you want more, and end up just needing the substance to feel normal, not good. 
  • These, and many drugs, work by blocking the recycling of the brain’s neurotransmitters. Cocaine is a dopamine reuptake inhibitor. Heroin is an endorphin inhibitor. Sugar, in excess works the same addictive pathways.
  • Think about your addictions – that is things you couldn’t do without or, if deprived, would start saying ‘I need…’. Do they really make you happy and contented or do they stop you feeling bad/tired/stressed? How long before you needWhat’s the difference between Pleasure & Happiness
  • The more pleasure we seek the less happy we get. And we are endlessly being sold means of getting pleasure – because it is addictive.Pleasure means something I want because it feels good at the time, so I want more, until that ‘want’ becomes a ‘need’.
  • Happiness means contentment. You feel good and are satisfied. You don’t want or need to buy anything. Pleasure seeking, reward and desire are all linked to the trio of ‘stimulating’ neurotransmitters - dopamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin – and the more activated the more ‘want’ turns into ‘need’.
  • This is the basis of addiction to caffeine, nicotine, cocaine, stress, gambling, video games, overeating, checking your mobile phone, facebook likes  and sex. Alcohol is the flip side of all this because it promote GABA which switches off adrenalin. This neurological highway has been hijacked to make us buy the latest iphone and check your email, Facebook and Instagram every 2 minutes, think more sugar or coffee or another drink will fill that need. The end result is we become addicted consumers and pleasure seekers and less happy as a result. 
  • Happiness is to do with the serotonin pathway which becomes depressed by the dominant over-stimulated dopamine pathway. Depressed serotonin leads to the hallmarks of 21st century living – anxiety, feeling stressed, poor sleep, carb and alcohol cravings.
  • We are sold various forms of caffeine, sugar and alcohol as the answer to happiness. Think of ‘happy hour’. Addictive substances tend to have a variable reward – they don't always work so you want more, and end up just needing the substance to feel normal, not good. 
  • These, and many drugs, work by blocking the recycling of the brain’s neurotransmitters. Cocaine is a dopamine reuptake inhibitor. Heroin is an endorphin inhibitor. Sugar, in excess works the same addictive pathways.
  • Think about your addictions – that is things you couldn’t do without or, if deprived, would start saying ‘I need…’. Do they really make you happy and contented or do they stop you feeling bad/tired/stressed? How long before you needWhat’s the difference between Pleasure & Happiness
  • The more pleasure we seek the less happy we get. And we are endlessly being sold means of getting pleasure – because it is addictive.Pleasure means something I want because it feels good at the time, so I want more, until that ‘want’ becomes a ‘need’.
  • Happiness means contentment. You feel good and are satisfied. You don’t want or need to buy anything. Pleasure seeking, reward and desire are all linked to the trio of ‘stimulating’ neurotransmitters - dopamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin – and the more activated the more ‘want’ turns into ‘need’. 
  • This is the basis of addiction to caffeine, nicotine, cocaine, stress, gambling, video games, overeating, checking your mobile phone, facebook likes  and sex. Alcohol is the flip side of all this because it promote GABA which switches off adrenalin. This neurological highway has been hijacked to make us buy the latest iphone and check your email, Facebook and Instagram every 2 minutes, think more sugar or coffee or another drink will fill that need. The end result is we become addicted consumers and pleasure seekers and less happy as a result. 
  • Happiness is to do with the serotonin pathway which becomes depressed by the dominant over-stimulated dopamine pathway. Depressed serotonin leads to the hallmarks of 21st century living – anxiety, feeling stressed, poor sleep, carb and alcohol cravings.
  • We are sold various forms of caffeine, sugar and alcohol as the answer to happiness. Think of ‘happy hour’. Addictive substances tend to have a variable reward – they don't always work so you want more, and end up just needing the substance to feel normal, not good. 

These, and many drugs, work by blocking the recycling of the brain’s neurotransmitters. Cocaine is a dopamine reuptake inhibitor. Heroin is an endorphin inhibitor. Sugar, in excess works the same addictive pathways.

Think about your addictions – that is things you couldn’t do without or, if deprived, would start saying ‘I need…’. Do they really make you happy and contented or do they stop you feeling bad/tired/stressed? How long before you need more?

How to end addiction is based, first on restoring the brain’s normal ‘reward’ chemistry and promoting healthy serotonin response. A simple example is sunshine. It actually promotes serotonin and happiness.

Many alcohol dependent people have poor dopamine ‘resistance’ meaning their receptors aren’t working properly, which is why they crave alcohol. But this can be transformed with the right nutritional support.

In a simple study a medical center tested 15 various types of addicts checked in to a residential treatment centre for depletion of neurotransmitters such as these then devised an intravenous drip containing all the right amino acids to ‘flood’ the brain with these potent nutrients. The IV nutrient treatment was given for 6 days, followed up with nutritional supplements and good diet (everyone at this treatment centre had the good diet part). The average ‘success’ rate after one year is about 15% of people still clean or sober. Among those who received the personalised nutrition treatment 10 were drug free at the end of a year, 8 of which had had continuous sobriety.

14 people found this helpful
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